tom and hen turkeys


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Old 11-18-08, 04:29 PM
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tom and hen turkeys

Whats the difference between hen and tom turkeys(besides male and female). does one contain more white meat then others.

also I just got a 23 pound birdzilla tom turkey. when do i take it out of the freezer and put in the fridge to thaw. should i take it out sunday or is that too soon.
 
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Old 11-18-08, 06:05 PM
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Thawing turkey in fridge is the safest and easiest way. It takes about 24 hours for every 5 lbs. of turkey. And, turkey is good for 1 to 1 days before cooking.

Hens are usually smaller than toms and average 15 lbs or less, with toms being larger. Thus, birdzilla turkeys are most likely to be toms. No difference in flavor or texture or appearance of meat.
 
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Old 11-19-08, 12:11 AM
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so hens don't contain more white meat then toms or vis versa with dark meat. do hens cost more. doing the math it should take 5 days to thaw the turkey so i should put in in the fridge Friday or Saturday. if its still somewhat frozen you stick it(still wrapped) in cold water correct.
 
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Old 11-19-08, 12:35 AM
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Not aware of any research that indicates that toms have more dark meat than hens. Major differences between toms and hens, other than gender, is than the little girls like us tend to be more petite.

It usually takes about 5 days for a frozen turkey to thaw in fridge. If turkey is not thawed in fridge per 24 hours/5 lbs rule, then you can finish thawing in cold water in pan. If in doubt, place frozen turkey in fridge 6-7 days before cooking.

I once visted a friend who laid her frozen turkey out on the counter for thawing for several days prior to Thanksgiving. Of course, I had an invite. When she called to see if I was coming I told her I had the flu. No way was I going to dine where a turkey was thawed on the counter for several days. Too, although a great friend at work, this person was not great when it came to kitchen hygiene.
 
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Old 11-19-08, 12:16 PM
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You can put it in the fridge Saturday or Sunday morning at the latest.
Hens and Toms have the same amount of white and dark but I have found the difference is that the smaller ones (the hens) tend to taste better and be more tender. The bigger it is, the tougher it seems to be and starts to have a somewhat gamey taste to it, not to mention it takes forever to cook.
If you've already bought it, it's too late this year, but consider buying 2 smaller ones (10 - 12lbs. each) rather than one large one.
 
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Old 11-22-08, 07:23 PM
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another question. will the aluminum roasting pans melt in a 500 degree oven. the recipe calls for roasting it at 500 for 30 minutes then drop it down to 350 cover the breast with a double layer of foil and cook the rest of the way untill it reaches 161.

Good Eats Roast Turkey Recipe : Alton Brown : Food Network
 
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Old 11-23-08, 06:55 AM
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I tried out one of those aluminum roasters one time and didn't like it at all. You'll have to cook it much longer. I use the black roasting pans because they hold the heat better.

As for that recipe, maybe someone that cooks it that way can answer, but I've always cooked it at a constant 350 and cover it with aluminum foil, made into a tent shape for the first 2 or so hours (depends on the size of the turkey), then remove the foil and baste often. The skin is just right (nice and golden) by the time it's done.

Another tip, I do stuff my turkey (and haven't gotten sick yet, LOL ) but if you're not planning on stuffing, at least stuff some veggies in there, which will keep the white meat from getting done too soon and drying up. The reason people get sick from stuffing is because they're not cooking the turkey long enough. Beer 4U2
 
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Old 11-23-08, 10:37 AM
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My mother always stuffed the bird when I was a kid. No one ever got sick except possibly from overeating.

I haven't had a stuffed turkey in years though. When I lived in the south I learned how to deep fry a turkey. Try it once and you'll never go back. The only negative to fried turkey is that I miss the smell of a stuffed turkey in the oven.
 
 

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