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Food that is easy/not messy to transport and doesn't taste bad

Food that is easy/not messy to transport and doesn't taste bad

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  #1  
Old 11-30-18, 09:48 AM
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Food that is easy/not messy to transport and doesn't taste bad

When I was driving to work I could take leftovers in a tupperware.
Now that I'm biking to work, leftovers in tupperware won't work since leftovers tend to have inherent liquid and when the tupperware gets tilted, a mess results.
I've been taking hummus/flatbread and nuts and that's been working up until now that I'm getting tired of the taste.
Any recommendations on foods that require minimal/zero preparation, I shove it in a backpack, and get on with the day?
 
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  #2  
Old 11-30-18, 09:52 AM
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Jerky, packaged tuna, crackers, cheese, any kind of fruit. If you have a microwave at work, the microwavable container options are almost endless.
 
  #3  
Old 11-30-18, 10:04 AM
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How about a stuffed Italian bread. Buy frozen bread dough. Roll it flat. Then spread a layer of cooked sausage, onions, peppers and whatever you like. Roll it up into a loaf shape and bake. Then you can cut it into slices, wrap them in foil and their easy to transport.
 
  #4  
Old 11-30-18, 10:17 AM
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jerky and ready-to-eat microwave options typically have a greater amount of sodium than i should be consuming given my high blood pressure
 
  #5  
Old 11-30-18, 10:56 AM
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I bike to work as well. Turns out I'm bad at making meals for work so I just got better tupperware containers. The glass ones with plastic lids with the gasket that have snaps seem to be the best. I'm also bad at washing things in a timely manner, so once through those, if I have a sketchy Pyrex one that day (where the lid is all warped) I just put it in a plastic bag. The Thai food place here has really good "disposable" plastic containers that don't leak with soup, so I use those as well.

I mostly pack stirfry's because I make them for dinner and can make a ton of food really easily.
 
  #6  
Old 11-30-18, 11:04 AM
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Chef's salad with dressing on the side,
dry hoagie or sandwich with mustard on the side,
leftovers put over rice or noodles which soak up liquid.
 
  #7  
Old 11-30-18, 11:25 AM
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You could probably also figure out a way to tie a small cooler onto your bike or backpack. It would keep your containers from spilling. Better containers shouldn't spill anyway.
 
  #8  
Old 11-30-18, 12:29 PM
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If you have a hot water dispenser at work, freeze-dried food works great. Nice & light, no mess. The pre-made packages are expensive, but you can mix up your own meals if you buy cartons of individual food items.
 
  #9  
Old 11-30-18, 01:11 PM
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Following up on Xsleeper, rear wheel luggage rack helps immensely, (makes riding home with a gallon of milk and a takeout pizza workable)

Following up on Rye, and "just add hot water" get a case of ramen noodles from local superstore or asian market, but bring along some thin slices of home roasted rib-eye, brisket or rib meat, and a baggie with mint, shredded carrot and bean sprouts - instant pseudo-pho.

You might also consider upgrading the office cooking arrangements, a thrift shop bagel toaster and rice cooker give you lots of options for a low price.
 
  #10  
Old 12-01-18, 09:16 AM
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Soup in a thermos. Those are usually good about not leaking. Or if you have a microwave, bring canned soup, and a bowl. Either wash the bowl at work and leave it there, if you have a sink, or pack it home in a zip-lock bag to be cleaned.
 
  #11  
Old 12-02-18, 07:14 AM
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How about putting your traditional left overs in a zip-loc bag and then into the tupperware.
The Zip-loc should make them spillproof and the tupperware (or even some type of appropriate cardboard box) could make them crush/pop resistant.

You'd likely not have to even clean the tupperware after lunch....
 
  #12  
Old 12-02-18, 01:45 PM
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Better storage containers. Ziplock brand has a screw top. I use it all the time for backpacking. I start rehydrating my food in the screw top about an hour before lunchtime and lunch is ready just by the time and jossling in my pack. I also bike commute, and sometimes bring frozen soup. By lunchtime it's thawed enough that the microwave is quick.
 
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