Schlage Door Knob locks me out

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  #41  
Old 07-09-13, 08:02 PM
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I could replace them all myself if I wanted to spend all that extra money.
I am somewhat handy, after all I did this mod.
 
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  #42  
Old 07-17-13, 07:12 PM
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I am amused by the number of folks that find the "inside always unlocked" feature of modern entry-function knob/lever sets to be undesirable...Virtually all commercial/industrial locksets have always been this way. And, historically, the "locked inner knob" feature has always been associated with the cheapest Grade 3 locks, (light residential use).

Really, for you DIY'ers, the solution is to install a deadbolt (even a cheap one is better than the most expensive locking doorknob from the standpoint of security), & replace the locking doorknob (or lever) with a cheap passage set. Cylindrical (or sometimes called "Tubular") deadbolts look nice, but do require a hole saw or boring bit to make the holes in the door...cheap lock installation kits are avail. that use sheet-metal hole saws for this purpose, designed for occasional use.
 
  #43  
Old 07-18-13, 06:58 AM
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Folks like me are used to the type of commercial and residential "inside always unlocked" lockset that automatically unlocks when you turn the knob--not the lock button. I bought a 4-piece keyed-alike set of these and didn't realize right away how they were different from what I expected. Now I can't return them and they cost enough that I don't want to just eat the expense & start over. So far I haven't been caught by a door that will lock behind me when I don't want it to, but it's just a matter of time. I plan to hide a key outside...but what difference does it make what quality and level of security you install if there's a key handy?
 
  #44  
Old 07-18-13, 07:53 AM
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I didn't think my comment would cause a stir.

But I can think of an example of a baby sitter and not wanting her to have a key to my house or know where the spare is.

If the sitter went out to there car to grab something for whatever reason and closed the door behind them so the child couldn't get out, this could be a problem.

Anyway, that's just one example.

While a doorknob lock doesn't add much security, when I go out the garage entry door to work outside, I lock the doorknob and not the deadbolt.
I don't need high security at that point, just piece of mind that some wanderer doesn't find there way in too easily.

Anyways, that's just me.
I can't think of a house I've been in that didn't have both except for houses with the big fancy verticle pull bar and those obviously just had the deadbolt.
 
  #45  
Old 07-22-13, 01:35 PM
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Ok, so maybe I'm missing something, but I had the same problem described with the always-locked key side handle. I called Schlage and they had no idea and keep telling me to turn the locking mechanism to the vertical position and the outer knob would remain unlocked. It wouldn't. Having read the thread, and my lock being an FB50, I thought it was time to return or modify it. Before I did, though, I removed it, seeded the two ends together, and turned the locking mechanism. It's worked fine and both handles were unlocked. Moral of the story: the two knobs seemed properly seeded on the first install but they were not. Before going through all the modifications, remove the lock and start all over. If you feel the turn lock is not quite turning all the way in one direction or another, your install is properly incorrect. My wife just in screaming over the moving outside handle so I gotta go!
 
  #46  
Old 07-23-13, 09:34 AM
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There's an old saying, "You get what you pay for!".

If you want to pay peanuts, expect monkeys.

There are many products available that do what you want but you may have to increase your spend.
Meroni make cool looking functional handles that offer options in all functions but they cost more.
They even make schlage profile keyways to allow keying alike.

Another saying, "you can please some of the people some of the time, all of the people some of the time, but never all of the people all of the time"
 
  #47  
Old 07-23-13, 09:30 PM
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Yeah, this is an old thread, but...

I HATE THOSE DOORKNOBS! Previous house had them. Even though I work for an organization that commercially has doorknobs that can be turned when one side is locked, at home this SUCKS.

I have shied away from Schlage entirely because of this stupid door handle design. This design is the only one I've ever used in a consumer-grade type from them, so for all I know, all schlage residential knobs do this.
 
  #48  
Old 08-01-13, 07:43 PM
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Well, OK, for those that do not want to install a deadbolt with passage set, some manufacturers still offer a "Vestibule" function, but it will be a little pricey, as these are generally geared more to commercial applications. This function doorknob has a key on both sides; the inside knob is ALWAYS unlocked, but the outside knob is locked or unlocked with the key in the inside knob. This eliminates accidental locking by pushing a button or turning a thumbturn.

Some manufacturers called this function a "Public Entrance" function; since each cylinder can be keyed differently, or master-keyed, tennants/residents are given a key that will let them in the outer knob, when locked, but can't change the lock/unlock function. The manager/owner's master key however will operate both sides, allowing him/her to decide when to lock the outer knob, (at nite, for example.)

In a single-family residence, you could key both sides the same, and just hang the key on a hook near the door inside for convenient access.
 
  #49  
Old 08-18-13, 07:49 PM
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For those still following this convoluted thread, that don't want to do the "passage set plus deadbolt" answer to locking yourself out:

Though rarely found in residential applications, it can be ordered from your local smithy in a variety of brands, styles & finishes....generically called a "Corridor" lock, the technical function is known as "ANSI F90".

Outer knob locked by inner pushbutton OR outer key. When locked by pushbutton, turning knob OR CLOSING DOOR causes outer knob to unlock. (button pops back out). When locked by key, outer knob stays locked, until unlocked by key. Inner knob always unlocked.

In other words, you can't lock yourself out by "accidentally" pushing in button and closing the door behind you. When you leave, you use the key to lock the knob, just like a deadbolt. When you come back, unlock the knob with the key, enter, close the door, punch the button to lock the door.

You won't find this in the big box stores, nor in the cheap Grade 3 (Light duty).
But there are several Grade 2 (Medium duty) alternatives, as well as Grade 1 from which to choose (Grade 2 & 1: specify backset measurement, usually 2-3/8" for residential).
 
  #50  
Old 08-20-13, 04:13 PM
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Modify F Series for bedroom locks

I haven't found a solution for my problem, but perhaps this may help some of you with Schlage F series locks that lock you out. Here is my situation. I own a campus apartment building with 12 apartments. Each unit has 3 bedrooms. During a recent remodel we installed new doors and locks for each bedroom. With 3 college kids in each apartment, we find that they often like to be able to lock their own bedroom doors.

I made the mistake of going with a F series lock from Schlage. I should have gone with a light commercial, for both durability (though no issues with that after one year of use) and for function. The function problem is that it is FAR TOO EASY for a person to lock their door, leave their room with their keys left inside the room, and have the door lock behind them. We had dozens of lock outs last year -- some when a tenant simply went to the bathroom in the middle of the night.

So, I am looking for a solution that doesn't require buying 36 new locks - or adding 36 deadbolts. To add to the problem, the door frames are metal which increases the labor cost if I do switch to passage locks and add deadbolts.

In the course of my investigation into the F Series lock and options, I found a couple of modifications that some of you might find helpful:

1) delete inside button so lock can't be engaged from inside the unit. Simply remove the inside lever, remove the locking button from the inside handle, and then remove the black plastic sleeve inside that catches the spindle. Now insert a 5/8" metal (or nylon if you prefer) button in the handle to fill the hole. Reinstall the lever and the lock will sort of function as a dead bolt -- key will lock it and unlock it from the outside, and interior handle will remain free to open the door at any time. It would solve my problem except that the tenant cannot lock the door from inside his bedroom. This takes all of 3 minutes, or less to perform.

2) You can also convert the lock to a passage set (non locking) by doing the above, plus removing the key cylinder, and inserting a similar button to fill that hole. Now you have a passage set.

My hope was to find a way to modify the lock so that it would unlock whenever the door latch was operated. So far, no one seems to have a modification that achieves that. So, I am looking at adding a door guard of some kind on the door frame that will allow the tenant to essentially trap the door closed when inside the bedroom. That, with the (1) modification above, will get me to where I need to be, but this is not as elegant as having the right lock set in the first place. Oh well. Not the first mistake I have ever made.

Hope the above is some help to someone.
 
  #51  
Old 08-20-13, 09:04 PM
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I'm not aware of a modification for what you're after, but I'll throw in my 2 cents anyway.

1) I wouldn't spend a whole lot of time/effort modifying these locks in a college/student/rental environment....(I remember my college dorm days; no respect for other peoples' property). The mod you cite sounds fairly easy tho, and the addition of a medium sized "barrel bolt" could be done on the cheap. One small caution here tho, is that since this is "rental property" there is the occasional jurisdiction that will not permit slide bolts/barrel bolts and the like, and only permit standard single-cylinder deadbolts. You might check with your local Fire Department.

2) Assuming this is a long-term investment on your part, in time you will replace most, if not all of these locks as they fail, so do your homework now, visit a couple of full-line locksmiths to get some quotes on Grade 2 (light commercial) ANSI F90 function locks in your choice of finish, design etc.
Stick with well-known brands, that will hopefully carry your choice for years to come, the idea being that you only replace the locks one at a time, as becomes necessary.
 
  #52  
Old 08-20-13, 09:11 PM
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I meant to add, go ahead and purchase one of the locks you decide on and install it either on your own house or on one of the rentals, as a "trial run" to see how it does in practice.

PS: Make sure the new selection is the same Schlage "C" keyway so you can use your same masterkey, (if applicable).

Cheers
 
  #53  
Old 08-23-13, 10:02 AM
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I think I mentioned earlier about the Meroni brand of knobsets. Meroni do make an option that includes an emergency panic function that does what you want, When the latch hits the strike, it automatically unlocks the outside handle. When leaving, simply turn the key outside to lock your door.

Meroni handles are not typically keyed to Schlage keyways, but can be specially ordered if requested.

Cost varies by style and function and color options.

A typical Meroni Combina or Nova entrance handle (entry function - keyed) retails for about $75.
 
  #54  
Old 09-24-13, 05:29 PM
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I have a question for GlobalLocky or anyone who are aware.

I want to get foolproof knob set that will not lock by accident. The knob set can only be locked 1. inside with the door closed, and/or 2. outside with a key with the door closed. The locked knob on an open door will unlock as soon as it is closed.

What is this type of lock called and where can I buy it? No one at the store know what I am talking about. Many public washrooms use this.

Thank you very much.
 
  #55  
Old 09-24-13, 07:50 PM
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It's an emergency release function. Some brands of mortise locks include this function as an option. These types of mortise locks are generally quite expensive and considerably harder to install. The Meroni brand actually make this function with their emergency overide function (but it is a special order product). In other words, the lock can be locked when the door is in the closed position either inside or outside. But if the latch retracts at all, the lock with automatically unlock.
 
  #56  
Old 09-26-13, 06:46 PM
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Three possible ANSI lock functions come to mind:

1) Read post #49 for a description of the "F90" sometimes called a "Corridor" lock.
This is probably your best bet. Available in medium and heavy duty grades.

2) ANSI Function "F92" sometimes called a "Service Station Rest Room" lock might work for you: Outside knob or lever locked by pushing inside button. Turning knob to exit OR CLOSING DOOR IF BUTTON HAS BEEN PUSHED WHILE DOOR IS OPEN will unlock outer knob. This is so that ordinarily the door is always unlocked if nobody is inside. HOWEVER by using a spanner tool or similar to turn the inside button 1/4 turn, it will stay in so that the door can be closed and remain locked, after hours, for example. I've only seen this function available in a heavy duty grade.

3) The "F84" function, always called a "Classroom" function can only be locked or unlocked by key in outside knob. Probably not suitable for you, as, once locked by key, closing door will not unlock it.
 
  #57  
Old 09-26-13, 07:12 PM
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A slight correction to post #49: If the door is standing open, locking the outer knob by pushing the button OR turning the key will, when the door is then closed, result in the outer knob unlocking. This may indeed be the function (F-90) you are looking for.
 
  #58  
Old 11-29-13, 03:18 AM
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We had to replace our locks and wanted doors keyed the same.

The locks we got always are unlocked inside and from the outside depends on the direction of lever inside.

We have a small child in the home, so is there any way to change these to lock from inside as well. We don't want her to just be able to answer the door.
 
  #59  
Old 11-29-13, 03:44 PM
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Assuming you don't want the expense of replacing locksets, 2 ideas:

1) If these are knobs rather than levers, you can get some plastic child-resistant slip-on knob covers that require squeezing to turn the knob; Adults have the strength to grip & turn knob, young children do not.

2) If you have levers, (and so, can't use the above devices) you can get small decorative slide bolts that can be installed just out of reach of the child.

Just remember to balance your desire to limit a child's ability to open the door with life-safety issues; In the event of a fire, if the above devices are being used, only an adult with knowledge of the device will be able to quickly open the door.
 
  #60  
Old 11-29-13, 04:13 PM
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If you don't mind changing locks out, I think Kwikset's Tylo entry lock is still being sold. It's a very old design, very inexpensive. Rotating the inner thumbturn locks both the outer & inner knobs. There may be some cheap imports that mimic this design...They will all be "Grade 3" (designed for light residential use).

However, increased emphasis on life-safety aspects of lock design nowadays has resulted in fewer choices among this "both knobs locked" design.
 
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