replacing deadbolt and knob

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  #1  
Old 04-27-04, 10:44 AM
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replacing deadbolt and knob

Just bought a new place and want to replace deadbolt and knobs on the front and back doors (as they are double cylinder)... should I simply be able to unscrew them and put in new ones, as long as they're the right size. Or is there something else to it?

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Old 04-28-04, 09:57 AM
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If you are replacing the locks because you don't like them, ok. Yes, there should be two screws on the inside side of the door holding each together. Remove these and the two halves should come apart and allow you to remove the deadbolt and knobs.

If you are trying to ensure no one else has the keys to your house; instead of paying the price for new locksets, just have these rekeyed. You can even have them keyed the same if they are the same type. Check with you local locksmith or some hardware stores will rekey. Here it will cost me about two bucks to have a lock rekeyed. Which can save you a chunk of change if you have several doors to do.
 
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Old 04-28-04, 03:18 PM
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If you replace them with the same manufacturer and grade of lock, they will usually line up right. Even other manufacturers might. Look at the backset(many locks will come with adjustable latches), type of latch(mortise or drive in) and the size of hole required(usually the same for knobs but more chance of variation for deadbolts)
 
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Old 05-07-04, 04:50 PM
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If you call a few hardware stores, one of them can probably re-key your locks for a nominal charge.

If you want to replace them, they can re-key them so you don't have a wad of keys to deal with. If you decide to replace them, go with the same brand so you can use the same holes.

I just replaced five locks for a customer and all five (Kwikset) cost under $100 including re-keying.
 
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Old 05-21-04, 07:58 PM
WGW
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A lot depends on the age of your exisitng locks.
If they're less than 5 years old, just about any lock you buy should fit into the old cutouts as both holes were likely drilled to 2 1/8".
Older deadbolts were often drilled for only 1 1/2" holes which could limit you on which deadbolt to buy that will adapt to the smaller cutout.
Like the others suggested, having the new locksets all keyed alike is a convenience and easily done.

Double cylinder deadbolts are usually installed into doors that have a light in or beside the door. Of course the purpose of them is to prevent a thief from breaking the glass and simply unlocking the door by reaching inside for the thumbturn. Though your local fire department may frown on the use of a double cylinder deadbolt from a safety aspect, I usually suggest to my customers that they leave the key either in the inside cylinder while at home, or on a hook just out of reach of the door so you don't have to search for it should you need to escape during an emergency.
 
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Old 05-22-04, 04:57 AM
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Recently, I redrilled a door to change from a 1-1/2" hole to a 2-1/8" hole. I clamped pieces of 1/2" plywood over the existing hole, carefully measured for the new hole and drilled it out with a 2-1/8" holesaw. The plywood holds the holesaw pilot bit on line to get it started and I drilled from both sides.

Took about 15 minutes to make the layout and 2 minutes to drill it. (Measure 2-3 times and cut once. )
 
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Old 05-22-04, 08:47 PM
WGW
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Hi Dave;
If you have a good arbor for your hole saw, it will have a long enough thread to enable you to thread both 2 1/8" AND the smaller hole saw at the same time.
This method allows the smaller hole saw to act as a guide by inserting it into the exisiting hole while the larger hole is cut. That is how I usually redrill a door when it needs to be the larger dimention.

In a pinch, I'll temporarily install a latch (the type that takes a square spindle), reverse the pilot bit in the hole saw, and use the latch as a guide. It might chatter a little when first starting into the door, but it works.
 
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Old 05-22-04, 08:52 PM
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Hadn't thought of doubling up the saws on one arbor - might try it sometime.

Fortunately, I don't have to do that very often.
 
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