Removing a U.S. Lock Deadbolt

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  #1  
Old 07-15-04, 11:28 AM
soop
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Question Removing a U.S. Lock Deadbolt

Does anyone know how to remove a U.S. Lock deadbolt that has no visible screws? I tried the advice of other postings with a similar problem (with different deadbolt makers). I tried prying (ie - breaking) off the inside rim, but it won't budge (it does turn, however). There are two small holes on both sides of the deadbolt itself and I tried putting a tiny allen wrench in there, but that didn't seem to work either. Any other ideas? I'm pretty sure these are the original locks on the doors (15+ years).
 
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  #2  
Old 07-15-04, 06:38 PM
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Sorry, never worked on this brand myself. I will see if I can find something out.
 
  #3  
Old 09-06-04, 09:59 AM
tgriesman
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US Deadbolt Lock question (Key entry on both sides of door)...

Did anyone get an idea for this? I think I'm in the same situation, an old lock, that has a keyhole on both sides, no exposed screws or capped screws anywhere. (I believe this is illegal anyways). There is no way that I can find to get the cover off, nor does it look like there would be screws under anyway? How can I get this off?

Thanks.
 
  #4  
Old 09-08-04, 07:43 PM
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Some municipalities may have prohibited them but they are generally allowed on private residences. Still a good idea to keep a key in the cylinder when at home to allow quick exit.

Sorry, cannot find any info specific to this brand.
 
  #5  
Old 09-10-04, 06:59 PM
WGW
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Soop;
Did you have to remove the face plate on the bolt to see these two small holes on each side of the bolt?
If so, then it sounds like a "Lori" deadbolt with US Lock mortise cylinders.
You would need an allan key about 4 or 5 inches long to be able to reach the screws. About five turns counter clockwise on the allan key will allow you to unscrew the corresponding cylinder. Using a key inserted three quarters the way into the keyway usually works best in turning out the cylinder.

tgriesman;
A lot of "older" locks used a similar method as above to hold the cylinder in place except that the retaining screws are visible through the faceplate. There are sometimes one for each cylinder, and some have only one that works a cog to lock in both cylinders.

A little more thought on this brings to mind a double cylinder deadbolt made by Medeco (to name just one). Thiers have a nearly invisible circular spring clip around the inside cylinder that holds the cover plate in place, thereby covering the connecting screws. I've found that the best method in removing it is with a sharp pin, but hang onto it cause it tends to really fly sometimes on removal.

Regards
 
  #6  
Old 06-04-05, 03:35 PM
dgarlins
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"LORI" Deadbolt What a pain...

I have spent the last two days w/o a computer in our NEW 1950's vintage colonial. I've also spent the last two days trying to get this deadbolt off the front door! Here's a question now that I have a better sense on this subject: What size Allen Key?????
 
  #7  
Old 06-04-05, 05:23 PM
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Lori Lock and Beyond

Hi, I am not completely certain of the size allen wrench you need for this, but if I was to put you in the ball park, start with one about 3/32", and go up in steps until you find the right one.

As far as the Double cyl. U.S. Lock brand deadbolt, I have a question. Is there what looks like holes that have been blanked off? (These would be on the inside of the lock) If there is, take a key, and insert it fully into the lock, and turn it clockwise to about the 1 O'Clock position. This will turn an inside plate which hides the screws. Unscrew the 2 screws, and remove the inside cylinder. Now you will see that the inside lock cylinder is just sitting there. It is supported by another plate with 2 large (probably black in color) screws. Unscrew those and the outside lock will come out easily.

This should get you going no matter which type you have. Let us know how it turns out.

cuedude
 
  #8  
Old 06-04-05, 09:25 PM
dgarlins
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LORI lock

Sorry... but no. This is similar to the one discussed earlier in the thread. No screws on either side (inside/outside) and nothing other than a key hole.

After I took off the plate and (by chance) put the key in and turned, noticed the two holes on either side of the "lock bar" (not sure what it's called). I plan to pick up long allen keys tomorrow and will report back. These things are on my front door adn my back door. YIKES
 
  #9  
Old 06-05-05, 09:27 PM
dgarlins
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Success w/ the Lori Lock

I need to explain this in detail: ( I apologize for not using correct terms)

1. Take off the plate the covers the "lock bar" - the bar that comes out of door to lock it.

2. Stick your key into the outside key hole and turn it so the "bar" comes out. You'll notice two SMALL holes on either side of it. This is where it got tricky...

3. Using a 5/64 Allen Key, I stuck it into the hole closest to the "outside" key hole. I turned it quite a few times only to realize that "nothing" was happening. Or so I thought....

4. I took the lock key and stuck it back in the key hole and started to turn it and what'a you know, the hole lock assembly turned with it, coutner clockwise. A couple more twists and the outside part of the lock came off.

5. This then revealed three (3!!!) screws on the inside of the lock holding the "insde" part of the lock in place. I unscrewed those and the "inside" part of the lock fell off the door. Then I took out the "ring" on the inside of the door and pulled the "lock bar" out of the door.

All this and a big smile.... then I realized that I had NO keys for the new Kwikset deadbolt. Oops left them at the apartment... So I did not disassemble the back door lock after that.

I want to thank you for the help and plan to use these fourms again soon! Thanks... a new homeowner... Dave Garlinski
 
  #10  
Old 06-06-05, 03:04 AM
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Morning dgarlins,

Glad to help out. Now you can see that WGW was correct when he said those allen wrenches had to be long. Also, looking at the rings you removed, you can see the locks are held in by little set screws. It's a novel design, but as you see, they can be really confusing sometimes. Especially if you've never seen them. Good luck with the new locks.

cuedude
 
  #11  
Old 06-06-05, 05:44 AM
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Congrats on a successful project dgarlins!

Thanks for the step by step instructions, I am sure they will help someone else checking the archives in the future.
 
  #12  
Old 06-06-05, 08:46 PM
dgarlins
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Thumbs up No Problem

Hey... To be honest, this was the FIRST posting that came up on my search on Google. I was SO happy to find it! I'll check back when I need help again... SOON.
 
  #13  
Old 07-26-05, 10:01 AM
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Sears lock

I have a similar problem. My new (25 yr old) house has a double key dead bolt on the front door. I want to repalce it but cannot figure out how to remove it. No visible screws, the ring turns but nothing else. Is this the same thing as the one where you need to stick in an allen wrench to undo some internal screws that you cannot see.
Thanks for any advice.
 
  #14  
Old 07-28-05, 05:32 PM
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Hi, and welcome to the board.

From the title of your post, I gather it's a Sears lock? It's probably made by someone like Master, or infact, it could be made by Lori. To find out, remove the screws that would hold the bolt in the edge of the door. If it's a lori, the bolt has a cover plate which is removable. It's pretty thin, so be careful when you remove it. Lori locks have a small space betwen the actual bolt, and the sleeve it rides in. Use a flashlight, and look deep in that space. If you see a set screw, it's a lori. If the plate doesn't come out of the door, it's made by someone else.

I am not that familiar with Master brand locks. I have seen maybe 2 in 20 years, but they are out there. Maybe someone else can offer a suggestion. Good luck, and let us know what you find.

cuedude
 
  #15  
Old 09-05-05, 01:07 PM
LoneWolf15
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Hi Cuedude and Hardknocks,

Man, what an irony. I can't believe I found someone with the exact same problem by Google-searching this one.

I am trying to remove the exact lock that you describe. It's a Sears double-sided deadbolt, and appears to be made by Lori (or at least matches your description). It has the cover plate under the strike plate, and has two small notches on opposite sides of the bolt, inside the sleeve. It appears I can reach deep inside with an allen key to turn some hidden set screws, however I can only loosen them so far. I need to know how to get the bolt lock removed from this door, as I've just bought this house and found that the owner has three different keyed locks in the house, and an additional two different ones for the garage, so I'm trying to replace the locks. There are no exterior screws on the lock; I don't know if it's relevant but I also only have one key. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 
  #16  
Old 09-06-05, 06:01 AM
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Welcome to the forums Lonewolf15.

The set screws on a Lori-style lock hold mortise cylinders threaded into the housing. By inserting your key halfway in to the cylinder, you should be able to turn the cylinders out.
 
  #17  
Old 12-20-05, 06:36 PM
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Ran across another type of Sears double dead bolt lock today. Probably around 30 years old. Has two holes in an outer scalp/plate that is pressed on the interior side of the lock. There is an inner plate that covers the actual screws.

To gain access, I had to pry the outer plate off with a small screwdriver, remove inner plate which fits loosely and access the screws to remove the lock. Tossed the old worn out lock in the trash and installed a new Schlage.
 
  #18  
Old 07-09-07, 05:48 PM
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Lori Lockset

Originally Posted by schiejr View Post
Welcome to the forums Lonewolf15.

The set screws on a Lori-style lock hold mortise cylinders threaded into the housing. By inserting your key halfway in to the cylinder, you should be able to turn the cylinders out.
I did try the allan wrench trick followed by the key used as a screw and it worked perfectly for the inside lock. Then I came across 3 screws inside. I unscrewed these and then worked on the outer mechanism. Your advice worked like a dream. I couldn't stand that old lock and am so glad to be rid of it. However, on the allan wrench step, I did have to turn it more then 3 times counterclockwise (I think that was in a previous posting). I just wanted to say thank you so much for your help. I thought I was going to tear my hair out and you rescued me! Thank you!!!!
 
  #19  
Old 01-29-09, 04:50 PM
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Thank you--it worked!

I'm replacing all my old Schlage locks and deadbolts (they're probably 50 years old) and had no trouble with the keyed entry but couldn't figure out how to remove the deadbolt. I would probably never have figured it out without your advice. I saw two holes on either side of the keyhole, but thought the tiny screws had fallen out--and that the deadbolt would just pop off when pried. Once I got out a really small allen wrench, I discovered the little screws inside. I'd like to say it was smooth sailing from there, but when I went to put in the new deadbolt, I discovered it was much bigger and I'd have to cut a 2 1/8" hole. Nothing is ever easy, it seems, but your advice sure made it easier.
 
  #20  
Old 02-14-10, 05:08 AM
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Thank you!!!!

I had spent about 3 hours being stumped by a deadbolt lock fitting the description of the Lori lock (no visible screws) and was about to drill the lock out until I found this post. I can't tell you how pleased and grateful I am for this post. Super helpful. Thanks a ton. Beer 4U2
 
  #21  
Old 05-11-10, 10:46 PM
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Hello,
I have a Wieser lock that's from the 70's, and it has no screws on the outside. I tried doing what everyone else suggested on this page, but none of it worked. There were no screws behind the deadbolt. Does anyone have any idea's as to how to get the deadbolt off?
Thanks, S.
 
  #22  
Old 05-12-10, 02:29 PM
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Most of the posts on this thread concern the Lori double-cylinder deadbolt, which is in a class by itself. Assuming you have a stand-alone double-cylinder Weiser deadbolt of the era indicated, I think they used opposite-face screws, ie., one screw removed from the inner cylinder face and the other one removed from the outer face. However, there may have been a period when they used a shutter (similar to the Arrow locks of that era), whereby you had to insert the key into the inner cylinder and turn it slightly to expose the 2 screw heads for removal.
 
  #23  
Old 07-15-10, 08:59 AM
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Thanks - very helpful

This post saved me lots of time and I appreciate it. Thanks.
Originally Posted by dgarlins View Post
I need to explain this in detail: ( I apologize for not using correct terms)

1. Take off the plate the covers the "lock bar" - the bar that comes out of door to lock it.

2. Stick your key into the outside key hole and turn it so the "bar" comes out. You'll notice two SMALL holes on either side of it. This is where it got tricky...

3. Using a 5/64 Allen Key, I stuck it into the hole closest to the "outside" key hole. I turned it quite a few times only to realize that "nothing" was happening. Or so I thought....

4. I took the lock key and stuck it back in the key hole and started to turn it and what'a you know, the hole lock assembly turned with it, coutner clockwise. A couple more twists and the outside part of the lock came off.

5. This then revealed three (3!!!) screws on the inside of the lock holding the "insde" part of the lock in place. I unscrewed those and the "inside" part of the lock fell off the door. Then I took out the "ring" on the inside of the door and pulled the "lock bar" out of the door.

All this and a big smile.... then I realized that I had NO keys for the new Kwikset deadbolt. Oops left them at the apartment... So I did not disassemble the back door lock after that.

I want to thank you for the help and plan to use these fourms again soon! Thanks... a new homeowner... Dave Garlinski
 
  #24  
Old 07-15-10, 03:43 PM
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If I recall correctly, on the double cylinder version, those 3 screws never need to be removed; both cylinders are secured with set screws, so after removing the cylinders, the bolt simply slides out the door, then the inner body can be removed.
 
  #25  
Old 01-17-11, 10:52 AM
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Old Sears double-key lock removal (and other brands)

I bought a house built in 1953 that likely still had the original locks from Sears. The back entry door was a double-key lock with no apparent way to remove it. I went to Home Depot with photos of the lock on my cell phone and an associate assured me that there was a tiny slat to insert a flat-head into to pry it off. No, there was not!
This post was amazingly helpful and saved me from the next step of calling a locksmith who would have likely charged hundreds of dollars to do this job.
I came to DIY (should have been my FIRST stop!) and found this very helpful post but I wanted to add my two cents to the list of steps. Here is the original post:

I need to explain this in detail: ( I apologize for not using correct terms)

1. Take off the plate the covers the "lock bar" - the bar that comes out of door to lock it.

2. Stick your key into the outside key hole and turn it so the "bar" comes out. You'll notice two SMALL holes on either side of it. This is where it got tricky...

3. Using a 5/64 Allen Key, I stuck it into the hole closest to the "outside" key hole. I turned it quite a few times only to realize that "nothing" was happening. Or so I thought....(this is where I would add that once you place the 5/64 allen wrench into the tiny hole, turn your lock bar back into the door so that you can turn your wrench)

4. I took the lock key and stuck it back in the key hole and started to turn it and what'a you know, the hole lock assembly turned with it, coutner clockwise. A couple more twists and the outside part of the lock came off. I just wanted to clarify that for my lock, it required that I turn the KEY several times back and forth and the drum of the lock started to turn more and more in a counter clockwise rotation.

5. This then revealed three (3!!!) screws on the inside of the lock holding the "insde" part of the lock in place. I unscrewed those and the "inside" part of the lock fell off the door. Then I took out the "ring" on the inside of the door and pulled the "lock bar" out of the door.
 
  #26  
Old 01-17-11, 11:43 AM
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My memory was faulty on 7/15/10....the 2 LOWER screws MUST be removed to allow the latchbolt to slide out the door; the single upper screw may remain in place, as it is not necessary to separate the inner case halves.
 
  #27  
Old 01-18-11, 09:13 AM
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you have described the instructions for an old LORI deadbolt disassembly. Many retailers, sought out LORI brand deadbolts and renamed them with their own logo.
 
  #28  
Old 07-17-11, 07:18 AM
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Lori Lock - Beyond help

I think i'm beyond help!!

So I have this lock with no screws, tool off the face plate thing, removed it, can see the small indents either side of the barrel inside, they don't look like allen key bits, but i'll try that in a minute... here's the biggie. The reason that i'm removing it is because I snapped the key off inside of the lock. So I can't even turn it!

Please help, what do I do?
 
  #29  
Old 07-17-11, 05:17 PM
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remove the broken key or call out a locksmith
 
  #30  
Old 07-17-11, 05:21 PM
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some schlage deadbolts have screws underneath the inside faceplate. All LORI deadbolts have allen key retainers on each side of the bolt mechanism, not the barrel.

Take a pic and post it here for more accurate help
 
  #31  
Old 11-28-11, 11:34 AM
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Removing US Lock deadbolt

I too had a US Lock deadbolt (double key) that needed to be replaced and had those two little round "plates" on the inside face blocking access to the screws. Using a chisel that I didn't care about, I was able to pry off the two little plates and access the screws.
 
  #32  
Old 01-15-12, 06:31 PM
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Removing a "Lori" Brand Deadbolt.

I had the wonderful opportunity today of figuring out how to remove an old "Lori" brand deadbolt from a 1959 door installation. The man who designed these was a mechanical genius but also had a devious mind. Don't try to unscrew or pry off the escutcheon plates around the keyed blocks on the front or back of the door as I did unsuccessfully. Basically the first thing you need to do is remove the brass bolt guide plate from the edge of the door (two screws). Under this there could be a spacer which will also slip off exposing the end of all the bolt parts that extend through the hole from the interior lock mechanism to the edge of the door. If you look closely there are two holes centered at exactly halfway between the top and bottom of the bolt on both sides of the bolt. With a long 3" to 5" - 1/16" allen wrench you need to probe into both of these holes to loosen two allen set screws, on each side of the bolt. When you have loosened these all you need to do is unscrew the keyed blocks from threaded plates on the inside. The interior block unscrewed easily. I had to make sure my allen wrench was in as far as it would go on the exterior block and then lightly tapped it with a small hammer to achieve insertion into the hex hole on the set screw. Once I did this the exterior lock also unscrewed. A small flat head screw driver that fits into the key slot will work fine for this. But you are not there yet! You will now see the two plates with the large 1" holes in the center that the two heavy keyed blocks screwed into. Upon examination of the outside plate you will see that it is secured by three machine screws through the deadbolt parts and into the adjacent ring on the inside. Remove these three screws. The plates are now easily removable and the deadbolt parts can be removed directly out through the edge of the door. Congratulations, you can now install a new deadbolt! Wow, what a lock!
 
  #33  
Old 10-26-12, 04:12 PM
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Can't thank you guys enough, here's a video

Like many others who responded, this was the only thing I found while googling on how to remove 3 deadbolts on a house I wanted to buy. Those of you who have replied have my gratitude for the help. I went a step further and made a video as a visual aid for removing Lori locks (mine said U.S. Lock). I had to do 2 videos because I received a phone call, so the video shut off. I only created a profile on this site so I could post the videos here to hopefully help out others. Here are the links:

Part 1 - How to remove a Lori double deadbolt PART 1 - YouTube

Part 2 - How to remove a Lori double deadbolt PART 2 - YouTube
 
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