Mortis Lock - No Key

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  #1  
Old 08-04-05, 09:27 AM
t0mmy_b0y
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Mortis Lock - No Key

Hi.

I have an external door which leads onto a veranda. When I moved into my place the landlord didn't give me a key for it - apparently he's lost it. We've tried for months to get him to sort it out. Well to cut a short story shorter I need to drill out this lock as we can't afford a locksmith.

I've searched quite a bit of the forum but couldn't quite find the help I need.

I'm familiar with fitting locks but have never had to drill out a mortis lock before. Can anyone help with this? I don't know the make of lock as it is locked!

Thanks in advance!
 

Last edited by t0mmy_b0y; 08-04-05 at 09:30 AM. Reason: dodgy BB codes
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Old 08-04-05, 07:05 PM
cuedude's Avatar
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Originally Posted by t0mmy_b0y
Hi.

I have an external door which leads onto a veranda. When I moved into my place the landlord didn't give me a key for it - apparently he's lost it. We've tried for months to get him to sort it out. Well to cut a short story shorter I need to drill out this lock as we can't afford a locksmith.

I've searched quite a bit of the forum but couldn't quite find the help I need.

I'm familiar with fitting locks but have never had to drill out a mortis lock before. Can anyone help with this? I don't know the make of lock as it is locked!

Thanks in advance!
Hi Tommy_Boy,

Welcome to the board. If this is a true Mortise lock, it's a bit tricky, but not impossible. The first thing I'll talk about is the drilling part. Looking at the lock face, you will notice it's 2 piece, with a center. This center, for the sake of this response, I'll call the plug. This is in the actual lock cylinder. (The part the plug fits into.) Now before I go on, I have to talk about what goes on inside the lock to make it lock. The most common lock can either be 5 or 6 "Pin". This means that there are 5 or 6 little chambers each containing 2 "pins", and a spring. There is a bottom pin, top pin, then a spring. (Looking from bottom to top). These little pins work like pistons. (Sort of). With out these pins, the plug simply spins freely in the lock. And because the bottom pins are of different length, they litterally determine the "Cuts" of the key.

Now, lets get to the juicy part. because the plug and the cylinder are 2 piece, there is what is known as a sheer line when all the pins are lined up properly. Drilling a lock creates it's own sheer line, but destroyes the lock. In order to drill a lock, it must be drilled out just slightly above the actual sheer line. Drill as high up on the plug part of the center part of the lock, and above where the key goes in. As you drill, keep the drill as level as possible, and count each pin as they are drilled through. You will know when you make it through a pin. Kind of judge how much metal you go through between pins. After the 5th pin, and after drilling about the same amount as between pins, stop. Use a flashlight and look into the hole you just made. If there are pieces in the hole, they have to be removed. This is the hard part. I recommend something like a wire type bobby pin. You have to get all the trash out of the hole. Now take a flat blade screw driver and try to turn the plug to the unlock position. If it turns, you did it just right. But I have to tell you, it sometimes takes a while to get everything just right so the lock turns. Don't give up though, it does work.

Now, here's what I recommend in this case. And again, it depends on whether it truely is a mortise type lock. (And it is where experience comes in). Mortise lock cylinders screw into a lock body, and are usually held in by a set screw. I have on occassion taken a large pair of vise grips, and twisted them out of the lock. (That's why experience is necessary. It's really easy to ruin a lock this way.)

This is getting long, I know, but there's more. If you have something else other than a mortise lock, only the drilling part above applies. Once the lock is drilled, turn it 90 degrees either way, and it should unlock the lock. If it doesn't try turning the other direction.

Sorry this is so long, but it couldn't be avoided. I still recommend a locksmith as the best solution. They can get you through the door, take it apart, and make you a key to fit. As you see, it's way simpler than drilling the lock.

cuedude
 
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