Deadbolt / security questions

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Old 04-11-06, 01:50 PM
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Deadbolt / security questions

Hi, I had a few questions I was hoping to get some help with:

I am currently moving into a newly built home, and am considering safety measures. For some reason, the builder put NO deadbolts on the doors, so I have to install deadbolts in the front door, the door in the basement (at the bottom of stairs leading down from a Bilco (sp?) door), and from the garage to the laundry room. I am also changing the regular locks, but that is not the issue here.

I figure that I can use a single cylinder deadbolt for the garage and basement doors, but I am worried about the front door. The door has small windows running the length of the door on either side (about 9" high by 6" across), so I figured a double cylinder deadbolt would be the way to go. I am concerned, however, by the safety risk and I belive my homeownder's policy has a clause about these locks. The local fire code apparently has no restrictions, per the gentleman I spoke to at the fire department.

How do I make that door secure in this situation? The way I figure it, my options are:

- use a double cylinder lock (? feasible as noted above)
- replace the glass windows with another type of window (is this possible? If so, who would do this kind of work?)
- tie the windows into a security system (we are getting one installed, but again I don't know how feasible this particular feature would be)
- combination of the above

Any help is appreciated!
 
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Old 04-11-06, 05:47 PM
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"How do I make that door secure in this situation? The way I figure it, my options are:

- use a double cylinder lock (? feasible as noted above)
- replace the glass windows with another type of window (is this possible? If so, who would do this kind of work?)
- tie the windows into a security system (we are getting one installed, but again I don't know how feasible this particular feature would be)
- combination of the above"

Hello,

I can only speak of Florida codes here, and I don't know where you are. In Key West, if you own the property, you can add what ever type of deadbolt you wish. One thing alot of people do is at night, they leave a key in the inside lock in the event of fire. You wouldn't believe the panic that can occure when evacuating due to a fire. Therefore, I recommend the incorporation of the alarm system with your windows, as well as the door. (That would be easier than the window in the door.) It won't matter if the window is broken, that can be replaced. But if someone opens the door, the alarm sounds, and that's all you need. Check into the type of alarm that calles the police for you. This shouldn't increase the price too awful much, and gives you that added protection of knowing the police will be on their way.

I hope this helps you decide on your project. Let us know what you decide on, and how it turns out.

cuedude
 
  #3  
Old 04-12-06, 05:28 PM
WGW
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In addition to what cuedude has already suggested.

Instead of replacing the windows beside your door, you could have a piece of Lexan (plexiglass) installed over the existing glass.
That would make a breakin via these windows much more difficult as Lexan can withstand a hard hit with a hammer without breaking. Your local Locksmith or General contractor should be able to provide and install this for you.
Also while you're thinking security, remember to pay special attention to the strike side of the door frame as very often with this style of door the frame is fairly flimsy for securing the deadbolt.
Perhaps adding an aluminum astragal to run the full length of the frame top to bottom, the astragal can be secured every 6 inches or so for improved holding power in the event of a kick attack, then cut in the holes as needed for the knobset and deadbolt.
At the very least, an extended strike plate should be considered.

A security system is certainly a good secondary source for protection however, even if it dials your local police directly, an educated thief knows that he or she has approximately 5 to 10 minutes to collect the spoils before police will be on site. Sometimes much longer depending on your police departments priority policy on home alarms.
A suggestion here is to have the alarm company install a siren hidden in the home heating systems main ductwork. You would'nt believe how much louder that siren will sound when it echos throughout the whole house and loud noise is something a burglar surely does'nt want.

Hope this helps
Regards
 
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