Door hinge questions

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  #1  
Old 02-09-07, 03:01 PM
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Door hinge questions

OK, a couple of hinge questions that I feel stupid asking but here goes -

1. I bought some of the nicer Ives brass plated hinges for my entry door. They are a little different than the standard hinges (they have a pin and a pin cap on the other end). I installed them with the pin cap (the one with the small hole) on top. The problem is that the pins are starting to come out. Also, I could never figure out how to remove the pin on these hinges and I was afraid to use pliers and mar the finish. Some of them are also oozing grease. Not sure they are worth the $7 a pop!

Did I install them upside down?
How are the pins removed?

2. I painted all of the doors in my house after removing the doors and the hardware. Now I notice that several of the doors are rubbing or near rubbing the frame on the top outer edge. When I close the door it becomes obvious that the upper hinges have a wider separation between the hinge plates than the lowers thus causing the door to lean out. I vaugely remember seeing some hinges that looked like they were bent by the installers when I removed them. Is there any conceiveable reason to do this on new construction? I plan to just go ahead and replace the modified hinges.

Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 02-09-07, 03:42 PM
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Hinges

If the pins are falling out, the hinges are upside down.

Wrap the jaws of your pliers with several layers of tape to prevent marring the finish.
 
  #3  
Old 02-09-07, 04:20 PM
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Yes upside down. The hole, on the bottom ;-), should be large enough to start removal via pin punch.

It is possible that the builders bent the hinges to take up some of the sag. There are actual specialty tools made to do this, among other methods. They may have had the same problem with rubbing and this was a quick way to deal with it.

Cheap residential hinges or undersized hinges for the weight of the door are prone to sagging. Other solutions might include shims under one side of the hinge to tip it back a bit, or a deeper mortise cut.
 
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