Remove Deadbolt

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  #1  
Old 07-03-07, 01:46 PM
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Question Remove Deadbolt

I bought a house from an elderly lady who was seemingly obsessed with security. Burglar bars, security system, industrial exterior lighting, and a row of locks on each steel door that resembles a New York-Bronx apartment. Slowly, I'm turning the house back into a normal residence, but I still haven't replaced all of the locks yet. Now, I'm trying to replace the deadbolt on the back door but its not an everyday bought-at-the-big-box store lock. Its a double-sided deadbolt with no exposed interior or exterior screws. Instead, there are 2 holes beside the strike. There seem to be allen screws of some type down in the holes (too far down to see, but the allen wrench seems to be catching hold of something). The screws will turn either way but I can't figure out which way to loosen them. The locks don't have any brand name that I can tell. How do I remove this deadbolt?

Note: One of the other doors had an Asso deadbolt - but this one doesnt have that brand name on it. Also, I really don't remember how I got that one off, only that it was difficult.
 
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  #2  
Old 07-03-07, 05:56 PM
WGW
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Hi dneves
Your on the right track for removing that deadbolt.
You'll need to turn the allan screws about 5 or 6 turns counter clockwise, then insert your key 3/4 the way into the cylinder and use it to unscrew the cylinder (counter clockwise) Just be careful that you don't break off the key.
You could also use a small slot screwdriver instead of the key.
It sometimes helps to loosen the two mounting screws holding the bolt in the door as well.

Let us know how it worked out.

Regards
 
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Old 07-03-07, 11:47 PM
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I think WGW has offered the correct advice, although I'm a little confused by your description.

You said there were two holes on the strike.....do you mean there are holes in the bolt mechanism on the edge of the door?

If the holes are on either side of the keyhole...simply undo the screws exactly as WGW suggested.

Sometimes we can tell what kind of lock you might have by describing the key...what is written on the key....the shape of the head etc.

If the size of the cylinders on each side of the door is about 1&1/4 inch diameter....you will need to remove the face plate on the door edge which reveal two screws inline with the cylinders. Undo these screws and you'll be able to unscrew each cykinder from the door.
 
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Old 07-05-07, 01:29 PM
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Sorry I wasn't clear. There are no holes or screws beside the keyhole either inside or out. I mentioned two holes on the strike - i meant on the edge of the door. First, I removed the faceplate on the edge of the door. Then, I could see two holes are on the latch mechanism to the immediate left and right of the deadbolt. The lock uses a Schlage key.
I'll try WGW's advice. That sounds vaguely familiar as to how I removed the Asso lock. The cylinder on this lock appears to have been replaced so it might have originally been an Asso lock as well.
 
  #5  
Old 07-06-07, 07:00 AM
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In that case WGW's advice is on the money. And yes...many brands of mortise locks are able to accept "other" brands of cylinders...it is quite common.

Many people are often fooled by unscrupulous locksmiths into believing that they need to replace their complete hardware, when often cylinders, only can be replaced.....saving sometimes, hundreds of dollars!
 
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