Bad tenant changed deadbolt and took keys ... need to remove it

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  #1  
Old 03-02-08, 04:29 AM
CFC
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Bad tenant changed deadbolt and took keys ... need to remove it

Hey,

I need to remove a double cylinder deadbolt that's currently locked. I have access to the inside, where I see two screws.
Is there any chance I can remove this on my own, and replace it? I didn't get the brand/model info, but I can try to look for one next time I go to the house if that makes a difference.

By the way, the tenant bailed on the house (and her payment) and took the key. She didn't change the back door lock, so I still have access to the house.... still very frustrating but that's the risk taken when renting.

Thanks for the help.
 
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  #2  
Old 03-02-08, 05:02 AM
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Yep, just take out those 2 screws and it will come apart. If you buy the same brand deadbolt, you don't even need to replace the bolt in the edge of the door, just the outside cylinder and inside thumbturn. That's how I "re-key" when tenants move out; lots cheaper than getting a locksmith.
 
  #3  
Old 03-02-08, 06:31 PM
WGW
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Once you take those screws out, you can pull out the cylinders. Then use a flat blade screw driver to retract the bolt and open the door.
You can then either have the cylinders rekeyed to new keys, or it may be better to just replace the deadbolt if it's a cheap brand name.

Regards
 
  #4  
Old 03-03-08, 08:55 PM
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When the toilet flusher breaks do you replace the whole toilet or call a plumber to replace the flusher?

It really gnaws my gruff when I hear statements like this. Most locksmiths are ethical and not expensive. Sound like you have been ripped off by a scammer.

(sorry....I know this is a DIY site - but advising to bypass professionals in not the nature of this forum - so I thought)
 

Last edited by the_tow_guy; 03-06-08 at 02:47 PM.
  #5  
Old 03-04-08, 04:26 AM
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OK, here's the reality of it.

A Schlage deadbolt, cylinder 1 side, thumbturn the other side, is about $30. Around here, I can't even shake a locksmith's hand for that. Sorry I'm taking business away from the local locksmiths, but it's purely dollars and cents. It's tough enough to make money as a landlord, so I have to save money anywhere I can.

And no, I don't call a plumber when the "toilet flusher" breaks either. I just run to the store, buy new guts and replace it myself. Again, nothing against plumbers, strictly trying to make a couple bucks.
 
  #6  
Old 03-05-08, 09:37 PM
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And Removing the cylinders and taking them to a locksmith would probably not cost any more than $10 -$15 per keyhole to rekey......So now you who is trying to make a few bucks is actually costing you close to double.

Common sense suggests if you truly want to save money, using a professional will better serve you in the long term.

Often (and rightly so)...when DIY'ers require the services of a professional to fix up a stuff up, they bitterly complain about the higher price they have to pay.

Sure...go to the hardware store and Do It Yourself....buy the cheapo stuff to attempt to save money. If you pay peanuts you get monkeys.

Ever wonder why those really nice appartments always stay rented and receiving top dollar? The maintenance companies use first class products and top quality services. People will pay more if the quality of the appliances and fixtures is exemplary. In the long run, you would be better served by good quality locks. But it's up to you how you treat your tennants and the properties you own.
 

Last edited by the_tow_guy; 03-06-08 at 02:47 PM.
  #7  
Old 03-06-08, 04:30 AM
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If I bring the deadbolt to a locksmith for rekeying, I have to leave my unit unsecured, usually take time away from work, and drive to the locksmith. That just isn't an option for me most times. I need to get locks changed on site. That's why it's not cost effective for me to use a locksmith in most cases. Maybe locksmiths are more expensive here than other parts of the country; I know most everything else is. I do, and have, used a locksmith when circumstances dictate.

BTW, what brand and model deadbolt do you recommend? I was always under the impression that Schlage (I.R. Security) was one of the best; it's what I've always used. I know they have different grades of locks and latches, but I was under the impression there was only one grade, the B Series; and I sure don't see the need for the Primus cylinders for residential. In fact, when I write the hardware specs for our commercial buildings, Schlage is one of about 3 acceptable manufacturers of locks and latches. Sure hope I haven't been spec'ing cheap stuff the last 35 or so years.

Anyway, without going into a lot of detail, it's more cost effective for me the way I do things. Guess we'll have to agree to disagree. Besides, I wouldn't hold it against you if you didn't use a licensed architect to design a remodeling for your home.
 
  #8  
Old 03-06-08, 09:43 AM
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I understand the predicament you may be in and yes it can be more expensive to have a locksmith attend on site. As a landlord, if you held on to one or two 2nd hand locks that you temporarily put in the door whilst you get the originals rekeyed, you would save yourself from leaving the premises unsecured and still save money and provide a reputable locksmith with some income too. You also build a relationship with a quality tradesman that can pay dividends in the long term.

I personally would only deal with a registered architect because that way I am assured to receive full and complete code compliance and be guaranteed of such. Architects who are licensed and dont provide to code compliance risk loss of license.

The Schlage B300 series deadbolt is a cheap version sold primarily through the big box stores. The quality is not terrific but it is priced to compete with Kwikset, which is it's aim. Schlage products have long been considered better quality in the US market. Their recent decision to produce more product in Mexico and purchase lower grade raw materials, is affecting the quality control of product. Other models of Schlage hardware are significantly better but also significantly more expensive.

I have recently been installing some Weslock products which have a beautiful finish, are competitively priced and available in Gr 1, 2, 3 ANSI ranges.

I personally like Cal-Royal products because the quality of manufacture is very high. They are also competitively priced compared to Schlage.

When it comes to Primus, I am not a fan of Primus at all. I am biased toward another registered and restricted product.

I can supply a single sided deadbolt in Bilock for $89 and you can be guaranteed, no one can copy keys without your signature, you can have all your properties master keyed, you can change the combination without taking locks off doors.

Cost of keys varies but are around $12 each. Cost of replacement cylinders is around $30 each (replacement cores - as this is an interchangeable core product)
 

Last edited by the_tow_guy; 03-06-08 at 02:46 PM. Reason: Not necessary to quote entire post.
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