Sargent & Co. antique mortise lock - reassembly

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  #1  
Old 11-03-08, 05:06 PM
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Sargent & Co. antique mortise lock - reassembly

I have not been able to find anything on repair or maintenance on antique mortise locks, like a technical document that illustrates the parts and the proper placement of internal parts. I have a Sargent & Co. mortise lock (my front door) with a toggle circa 1900 to maybe 1920 at the latest. I removed & disassembled it to clean & relubricate everything inside the lockbody (no bit keys but that's another matter), and now, despite the rough orientation prior to & in disassembling it, I can't seem to properly orient all of the moving parts--it's the locking mechanism with the deadbolt--there are two different parts with a tine that works as a spring; the bevel cylinder & doorknob mechanism was easier to remove and reassemble properly after cleaning (and cleaning) the rust & the dirt/dust, and that works properly. Sargent only has technical documents for their modern day mortise locks, but their internal designs are very different from the victorian era design. An internet search only sends me to places that are determined to sell you something like new mortise locks, but nothing for restoration. Does anyone have any information about these types of locks?
 
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Old 11-03-08, 09:58 PM
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Having worked on many and varied brands and models of locks, I can safely say that most of the modern era mortise locks (post 1879) are quite simple in design. I strongly suggest you take it to a locksmith, as they will be able to properly repair and rebuild it.

It is a rule of this forum to not post any particular business, publicly, but I suggest you look for ALOA locksmiths with in excess of 20 years experience.

Depending on where in NC you are...I know of reputeable ones in Charlotte and Raleigh.

PM me for details.

Is it the bolt spring and lever that is the problem? I can probably dig up some documentation, but it might be appropriate to post some pics here so we can recommend the repairs, if you are unwilling to go to a reputeable locksmith.
 
  #3  
Old 02-28-09, 02:14 PM
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Sargent Easy Spring Lock

I have had the pleasure of working on a couple of these lately. The first thing I do is take a digital picture of the outside, remove the cover screws and take a shot of the inside just in case something goes badly. The internal parts are soft, maleable and bend easily. The damage I found in both units was due to bent parts allowing springs to slip out of place. The units are beautiful in their design. Write me directly if your'd like and I'll send pictures.[email protected]
 
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Old 02-28-09, 03:52 PM
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I second the motion for some photos....old bit-key mortise locks are becoming rare, and I'm glad you're taking the time to restore it. A note of caution--on a lot of these old mortise locks, the case-halves were made of a cast metal which rendered them very hard, but brittle; when re-assembling the case halves, be sure they seat properly to avoid breaking the flat half as the screw(s) are tightened.
 
  #5  
Old 03-28-09, 07:35 PM
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Help needed with old Lockwood mortise lock

Hi,
I saw this thread offering assistance on a Sargent & Co mortise lock. I'm having fits with a similar problem -- the "plunger" suddenly stopped extending on our exterior Lockwood. When I opened up the case, I found two leaf springs that had become dislodged from their "homes". While my observation and mechanical skills say I should be able to figure out how to put them back into place, I just can't find the magic way to do it. I hate to bother you with such a stupid problem, but I'm at wits end trying to get this thing back together correctly. I'm including a jpeg link that shows the innerds. The two leaf springs in photo are of different widths, so I doubt that they are actually broken -- just need to be put back into their proper position. Any suggestions?
Hey, many thanks!!!
Snapfish: Share Photo:Registration
Jim
 
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Old 03-29-09, 09:13 AM
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it's a little difficult to see in your pic, but thanks for posting as it shows that the feather spring is broken. You need to replace the spring with new steel.

I think you should be able to use the longer spring to locate between the latch and the bolt mechanism, leveraging off of the bolt mechanism, to press the latch out.
 
  #7  
Old 03-29-09, 09:18 AM
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you could of course replace the whole thing with a Baldwin mortise lock, which will fit in exactly the identical place.
 
  #8  
Old 06-28-10, 08:34 AM
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Hi - I'm new to this forum and sorry to hijack this thread but this seems to be the only Google hit...

I too have an old Sargent & Co "Easy Spring" mortise lock set. It has a split (lengthwise and not across) spindle where 1 end is threaded for the handle (1/2 of 3/8") and ends in a hook or lip that holds the spindle in the lock set. The other piece is just 1/2 of a threaded shaft. When placed back to back, they form a threaded rod which the handle screws in upon and the the whole thing is locked together by a set screw pinching the two parts of the shaft.

Anyway over 90 years, the threads on my spindle have worn down, the set screw no longer bites and the handle spins/slips off. I'd like to fix rather than replace since the lock is probably original to the 1919 house.

Does anyone know were to get a replacement spindle?

Thanks Grady
 
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Old 06-29-10, 08:37 AM
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You can find them online. Do a search for antique knobs or split spindle's.

This forum frowns upon recommending any particular business other than at the discretion of the site admin, so giving you a name is not allowed.
 
  #10  
Old 07-01-10, 05:36 PM
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I think ILCO still makes replacement split/hook spindles. Now known as KABA ILCO, ask your local smithy to order you one. Should be pretty cheap. I'd use some blue Locktite on the threads when re-assembling, both on the spindle threads and the set screw threads.
 
  #11  
Old 07-03-10, 09:56 AM
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Thanks for the suggestion. Unfortunately, the replacement (new or old) is made of unabtainium so I'll be machining something to work.

The fun bit is I confirmed the lock set is original to the house and helped confirm the date of the house (1919 but the city says 1926) based on a Sargent catalog for sale on eBay. Grady
 
  #12  
Old 07-05-10, 01:33 PM
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Be you a machinist by vocation or avocation, you will probably end up with a better made product than the ILCO one-size-fits-all replacement...they used to be made of fairly mild steel with crudely-cut threads. Sometimes they'd work, sometimes they wouldn't. Good Luck!
 
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