Home Security Doors

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  #1  
Old 08-24-09, 06:07 PM
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Home Security Doors

I was looking for different security door options for my home and I found this company: Dierre USA - European security doors, fireproof doors, garage doors and window security systems
I believe the have the best product on the market now. I contacted them and they have a lot of beautiful doors, all safe like and fire-proof, and I thing it is good for everyone looking for good doors to check their products.
I also have a question if by installing these kind of door can I have a discount on my home insurance?
Mark.
 
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  #2  
Old 08-25-09, 03:19 AM
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This really sounds like an advertising post, rather than a legitimate question, in my opinion.

European style door manufacturer trying to get a foothold in the USA by linking through a DIY site?

Something odd there.

These kinds of doors have been around for many years by different manufacturers.

In Israel, the door company known as Pledelet, have been making solid security doors and entrances for close to 40 years, using Mul-T-Lock as their cylinder locking system. They are solid steel, four point locking into steel jambs/frames, bomb resistant, fire retardent and virtually impenetrable.

My question is, would building codes and life safety codes accept this style of doors when installing them could potentially prevent emergency services from busting down your door in an urgency?

I believe the focus of DIY forums should be more to educate the market on ways and means to solve problems, rather than advertise one product over another.
 
  #3  
Old 08-25-09, 05:35 AM
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Sure seems like it, but just in case...

Unless you are applying these same efforts to the other entry points in your home (aka the windows), these doors are, IMO, a complete waste. Windows are still by far the easiest way to get in to a home.

As for the insurance discount, only your carrier can answer that question, as discounts vary widely.
 
  #4  
Old 08-25-09, 10:27 AM
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wow...pretty women, pretty doors....costly, no doubt. but, as previously posted in different words, "a chain is only as strong as it's weakest link".

GlobalLocky, do you recognize the lock shown in some of the pictures? I believe it's the old Cisa 4-bolt-4-throw lever lock...I bought one about 30 years ago when I was living in Latin America. You have to turn the jail-cell sized key through 2 full revolutions to fully throw/retract the boltwork. I wonder if the inside knob is single-action, ie., retracts the latch & bolts simultaneously?
 
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Old 08-25-09, 10:34 AM
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Looks like Sharon Stone...but wouldn't you want to keep her OUT? (Fatal Attraction)
 
  #6  
Old 08-25-09, 12:40 PM
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Yeah, no kiddin'...

Just to clarify, the Cisa I've got is strictly a 4-bolt deadbolt; no latch....these doors have the integral latch, with a doorknob of some sort, that's why I was wondering if the inner knob/lever is single-action or do you have to turn a T-turn twice then the knob/lever to open the door?
 
  #7  
Old 08-25-09, 08:47 PM
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Yeah Cisa made them under license from Yale. After the patent ran out they started making them with euro cylinders (and turned the cylinders upside down).

You know why euro cylinders are all upside down?
 
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Old 08-25-09, 11:10 PM
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I am new to this forum and I appologize if I started my question with "advertizing", but I just liked their product.
The Israeli company name is actually: Pledelet, but where you can find their products in US? Do you know the distributor?
I will give another "advertizing" shot: Security Windows and Doors From Burglar Proof to Bullet and explosion Resistant this is an option to secure other entry points to your home.
 
  #9  
Old 08-27-09, 07:29 AM
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Well now, there's a smithy trivia question....I figured it was because, for whatever reason, they prefer their deadbolt below the latch, whereas we generally have the bolt above the latch on mortise locks. So why that?
 
  #10  
Old 08-27-09, 09:25 AM
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Originally Posted by rstripe View Post
Well now, there's a smithy trivia question....I figured it was because, for whatever reason, they prefer their deadbolt below the latch, whereas we generally have the bolt above the latch on mortise locks. So why that?
I'm lead to believe that the creators of "Euro Profile" cylinders, built them "upside down" (not to Europeans, mind you) because the shape of keyholes in all mortice locks up until that time was identical.

Almost every lever type mortise lock like Chubb, Era, Legge, Lane etc, used old fashioned "skeleton" type keys. The flags were always facing down.

It was perfectly natural to look at a keyhole and determine that "upside down" was the correct way.

It makes perfect sense doesnt it?

@Marluck Pledelet in Israel are but one manufacturer of these doors. In the USA, the key and locking hardware product is sold by Mul-T-Lock, part of the Assa-Abloy empire.

The new site you show, advertises bullet proof doors etc. While in the USA you can invest in polycarbonate glazing, which is made from 1/16" thick to 1/2" thick. The thinner product can be applied as a film to existing windows and doors to make them shatter proof/resistant. The thicker product can be used as stand alone doors or windows. It is considerably more competitively priced and will fit most existing applications.

Thanks for posting the sites that interest you, but it just seems that the original nature of your post, might have been an advertising ploy, in my opinion.
 
  #11  
Old 08-27-09, 01:35 PM
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Well it makes sense to me....maybe because the switch over to pin tumbler in Europe was more gradual than in America, so for many generations a mixture of pin tumbler and lever locks co-existed. The average person's keyring probably had both types, so by the pin tumbler makers conforming to the "Bitting down" standard for lever locks, it simplified things.

So much for scientific explanations...
 
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