Installation of New Deadbolt in Hollow Metal Door

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  #1  
Old 03-13-10, 07:38 PM
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Installation of New Deadbolt in Hollow Metal Door

I have seen threads with subjects that want to install new deadbolts in steel doors, but all of the doors had wood edges. My condition is a hollow metal (steel), fire rated, door with steel edges. What is the best means of installing a deadbolt in my door? I have heard of using a cold chisel to recess the edge to cutting a rectangular hole and adding plates to jig sawing an "H" cut and bending the resulting tabs to fit the faceplate in the edge. Or conversely, is there a deadbolt, keyed on the exterior and thimbturn on the interior which does not require the installation of a faceplate? Thanks for your assistance.
 
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Old 03-13-10, 10:03 PM
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You can install a surface mounted deadlock easily or if you really desire a deadbolt, some have "knock-in" bolt mechanisms. These dont require any screws in the bolt assembly (obviously).

Surface mounted deadbolts similar to the claw bolt designs, where there are two bolts (like fingers) that connect to the strike (keeper) that is shaped like 2 rings. Turn button inside and keyhole outside. Then you only need to drill the 2-1/4" hole for the external key cylinder.

While I dont recommend Bird products (generally), this particular beast they make, while cheap in quality, is still pretty secure when installed correctly and will comply with all life safety codes.

They sell for about $25.
 
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Old 03-14-10, 09:05 AM
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Thanks, any "knock in" manufacturers?

Thanks Global, I thought about the surface mounted deadbolts, but I'm suspicious of the 'push-in ability' of the screw fastener of this type; that is it is only as good as the screws, right? If you could call-up any manufacturers that carry the "knock-in" type, I would appreciate the info. At least the standard deadbolt is sandwiched to the door, there are no fasteners on the exterior and the bolt cannot be accessed (the jamb stop prevents this).
 
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Old 03-15-10, 02:39 PM
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You could use metal threaded screws with closed end nuts. So you drill the screwholes right through the door and then the capped nuts are all that is visible outside (around the cylinder).

Knock in deadbolt mechanisms are made by virtually all manufacturers, but you'd have to ask deliberately.
 
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Old 03-16-10, 07:18 PM
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Have not done these in a number of years, but I doubt the design of "drive-in" bolts (Global's "knock-in") has changed much....I never cared for them too much, seemed like after a year or 2 in service they would loosen up in the hole to the point of becoming sloppy, resulting in decreased security.

Consider that in about 40-50% of the cases there is sufficient clearance between the door & the frame to surface-mount the flanges of the conventional bolt. The method I used when clearance was not avail, was to cut a hole in the door edge slightly larger than the bolt diameter itself, mark the holes for the flange screws, drill them 3/16", then insert the bolt thru the cross-bore hole, & with the bolt thrown, hold it against the inner surface of the door's edge, and secure with 3/16" steel pop rivets.
The slight reduction in effective bolt projection is of little consequence, as the door/frame clearance is small to begin with. Remember to increase backset about 1/8" when drilling crossbore hole.
 
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Old 03-16-10, 07:29 PM
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Another "Hollow-Metal" door tip when installing cylindrical deadbolts (some used to call them "tubular" deadbolts) is to use an internal spacer that prevents the door halves from collapsing when you tighten the cylinder screws....I forget the brand usually used...Global would know... it's a plastic tube-like thing that will compress to allow insertion, then it expands inside the door. The deadbolt can then be secured very tightly.
 
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Old 03-16-10, 07:50 PM
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Another method you might consider, that results in a very secure installation, is the use of a "wrap-around" sleeve, avail from most locksmiths, in several finishes and sizes....an oversized rectangular cutout is made in the door edge, to allow the sleeve to slide on flush, use the sleeve's crossbore holes for a template, then cut the crossbore in the door. The sleeve covers up any sloppy cutting in the door. The only disadvantage of sleeves is they give a somewhat "industrial" look to the door.
 
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Old 03-17-10, 03:50 PM
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I dont know the ones you mean.

Another method, I've used in the past, is to cut the hole in the edge to the exact size of the faceplate (of the bolt).

Attach a tab (with 2 holes about 1/2" apart) to the bottom and top screwholes of the bolt with nuts and bolts.

Then Drill and countersink holes in the door edge lined up with the other holes in the tabs. Use self tapping screws to attach the tabs to the screws.
 
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Old 03-18-10, 12:40 PM
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I've sort of been waiting to see if someone had a better idea than what I did. The holes in the face of the door are no problem but the striker/bolt was a P.I.T.A. the way I did it.

I cut a rectangular hole in the edge of the door. Then I made a plate that would accept the bolt of the lock and pre-drilled the holes. The plate I made I inserted at an angle through the hole in the edge of the door and held it in place against the edge of the door with a piece of wire. Then I welded it in place. This created the needed recess in the edge of the door to accommodate the bolt.
 
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Old 03-18-10, 03:08 PM
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In the locksmith industry a company manufactures specialty products that can be used to help with these kinds of installation problems.

They sell to locksmiths and lock distributors primarily, but you could order from a locksmith if you ask.

The B Series Snap In Bridge is designed to allow fixing to metal doors.

The picture in the bottom right of this link...

http://www.gklproducts.com/uploads/G...it_Catalog.pdf
 
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Old 03-18-10, 07:44 PM
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Pilot, I'll bet you ended up with with the best installation ever, but I wouldn't want to try to earn a living that way! A locksmiths' labor rate generally allows about 15-20 min. to install a deadbolt in a hollow-metal door, incl. sweeping up the mess. Of course, on ones own home, one tends to be more perfectionist, right?

Global, maybe they don't make that anti-collapse thingy anymore...if so, too bad, they worked great.
 
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Old 03-18-10, 08:53 PM
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Global's "Bird" lock is I think what we in these parts call a "jimmy-proof" lock, and in the New England states, is still referred to as a "Segalock". But talk about a great concept, with usually a poor execution; Yale used to make a good one, as did Segal, but most of what I've seen anymore are cheap imports using pot-metal castings and supplied with useless screws. Medeco offers one that I have no doubt is well made, but I won't even look up the price of that one....!

However, a good one, if well-mounted is hard to beat on a solid-core in-swing door...but the typical DIY'fer is not going to go shopping for specialized fasteners such as "sex-bolts" and unusual length strike screws.

And my wife says they're ugly, so it ends right there!
 
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Old 03-18-10, 09:30 PM
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In Australia, the Lockwood 303/355 "jimmy-proof" deadbolt is very popular and extremely well built. Albeit a little expensive at around US$180.00



But it is secured to the door with six screws, including the two rim cylinder connecting screws. For metal doors we installed a steel packing plate.

There were 2 versions initially, one with a flange and one without.
The flanged model was discontinued.

The steel packing plate allowed the open out door to have the lock sit correctly so that the strike would line up easily.

Once fitted, it is almost impregnable. Abloy also make (made) the Abloy Superstopper, which was made from hardened steel plate, with the bolt mechanism made from stainless steel. It was (is) significantly more expensive.
 
  #14  
Old 03-19-10, 05:28 AM
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Originally Posted by rstripe View Post
Pilot, I'll bet you ended up with with the best installation ever, but I wouldn't want to try to earn a living that way! A locksmiths' labor rate generally allows about 15-20 min. to install a deadbolt in a hollow-metal door, incl. sweeping up the mess. Of course, on ones own home, one tends to be more perfectionist, right?

Global, maybe they don't make that anti-collapse thingy anymore...if so, too bad, they worked great.
That little project killed half a Saturday and that was with a full machine shop 50ft away. Even I, working for free, swore it was not worth it.
 
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