How To Add Slide Bolt (etc) When There Is Trim


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Old 04-22-10, 06:11 PM
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How To Add Slide Bolt (etc) When There Is Trim

Hello,

I want to add some kind of interior lock (that can't be open from the outside). Not sure if it's called a slide bolt or dead bolt (not sure about the terms). The problem is, my trim sticks out (see photos) and I'm not sure how to deal with that. Seems like there has to be a better solution than gouging out the trim. I can't seem to find anything sturdy at the local hardware store...or online. Maybe because I'm not sure with the terms. Any ideas?

Thanks in advance!

Steve

My Photos
 
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Old 04-22-10, 07:07 PM
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What do you think about a "charlie bar" or door secuity bar?

A good one will still work with your lever type door handle.

Anything surface mounted like a chain, slide bolt etc. will require you to slightly modify your trim. Which should be considered cosmetic especially in context with security installations.

Amazon.com: Master Lock 265DCCSEN Dual-Function Security Bar
 
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Old 04-22-10, 08:39 PM
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If I might ask, since you already have a deadbolt, and only you have the key, what is your security concern?
 
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Old 04-22-10, 10:02 PM
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Thank you. But, hmm...didn't love the Charlie bar. Think I will go for something door mounted - and just deal with the trim. I guess the next question is, are there certain types of bolts that impact trim less?

As to why I want the deadbolts, well, because locks are extremely easy to pick - as least the ones that I have on my house are. I watched a locksmith pick my door in about three seconds. Yikes.
 
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Old 04-23-10, 01:35 AM
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It seems the simple solution here may be to purchase a key cylinder product that is difficult to pick or bypass.

There are multiple products available on the market.

I personally recommend Bilock as a system that most locksmiths have too much trouble to pick or bypass.

There are many other systems out there to choose from, all of competitive value but rarely of competitive cost to Bilock.

With Bilock, you not only get a lock that is hard (improbable) to pick or bypass, but also that no one can copy keys without your written permission.
 
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Old 04-23-10, 07:15 PM
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I understand your concern.....is this door used regularly to come in with your key? What brand is the keyed deadbolt?
(looks like a Schlage) Do you have a number of other locks that this key fits as well?
 
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Old 04-23-10, 08:25 PM
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Here rental apartments must have a one sided dead bolt in addition to the regular dead bolt. Basically what companies like Kwikset is selling is a regular dead bolt minus the key cylinder and an adapter that the turn button plate screws go into. The hole is drilled only part way through the door. Just enough to clear the bolt. Don't know if they are available everywhere.
 
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Old 04-26-10, 02:56 PM
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Hi all. I was hoping to avoid having to replace my lock with one of those higher end hard-to-pick kinds. I have three doors (with six locks) I'd have to change. Or I could change only the dead-bolts...but then I'd have two keys. Plus I like the idea of it being 100% IMPOSSIBLE for someone on the outside to get in...without making some noise, at least (in a worse-case scenario). I like this one-sided deadbolt idea.

Are you talking about this:

Amazon.com: Kwikset 663 3 CP Single-sided Deadbolt Kwikset Plus: Home Improvement

Is it something a locksmith can install. Looks like it needs some special tools. Though - "special" to me is probably standard for a locksmith...
 
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Old 04-28-10, 11:53 AM
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That's what he's talking about. You need a 7/8" or 1" hole saw, (spade bit will work, if careful), and a chisel, (1" ideal).

Other makes have a blank plate outside, and can be installed in place of an existing keyed deadbolt (that uses a through-hole).

I still ask if you use this as an entry door, ie., do you even need a key lock on this door?
 
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Old 04-28-10, 01:23 PM
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Originally Posted by rstripe View Post
That's what he's talking about. You need a 7/8" or 1" hole saw, (spade bit will work, if careful), and a chisel, (1" ideal).

Other makes have a blank plate outside, and can be installed in place of an existing keyed deadbolt (that uses a through-hole).

I still ask if you use this as an entry door, ie., do you even need a key lock on this door?
Good advice but you can't use a hole saw. A Forstner bit is ideal for the pocket but must be used in a drill press or drill jig clamped to the door. You can use a spade bit in a hand held drill but you must be very careful the tip doesn't go through the other side.
 
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Old 04-30-10, 01:36 PM
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The 7/8" hole saw is for the edge bore and strike bore, the chisel is to mortise in the bolt. For the crossbore, most one-sided deadbolts require a 3/8" or so tailpiece hole and a couple of pilot holes for the mounting screws.

I kinda prefer the type with a back plate on the outside---a little more secure, and since the screws are thru-bolted, you can get them good'n tight.
 
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Old 04-30-10, 02:22 PM
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Thanks again.

RStripe, you say the one with the back-plate is more secure? I would think having NOTHING on the outside would be more secure. Or are you saying it's more secure because it's sturdier (and there really isn't much of an additional risk by having the backside exposed)?

As to your question: "I still ask if you use this as an entry door, ie., do you even need a key lock on this door?"

I guess I didn't understand the question...and still don't. Because if I were to answer based on my understanding of the question I would say, "What entry door DOESN'T have a key lock?"
 
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Old 04-30-10, 02:34 PM
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Ummm I have a french patio door w/o a key lock. Since we would never enter that way..we decided to not put that in.
 
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Old 04-30-10, 02:39 PM
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Right...but the question was:

"I still ask if you use this as an entry door, ie., do you even need a key lock on this door?"

So if you "never" enter that way then you aren't using it as entry door, are you? Unless "entry door" means something other than a "door one uses to enter"...
 
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Old 04-30-10, 02:54 PM
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Well I can't speak for rstripe...but...you have primary entry, secondary, tertiary...whatever. I mean, heck, I never go in my locked house from my back doors (though I guess I could)..it's either front door or garage (rollup) door. Of course I use the other doors when I am going in and out and the house is occupied...but I assume he meant PRIMARY means of entry.

Its not that hard to install a thumb turn deadbolt that is only recessed into the door partially...nothing visible from the outside. But that really doesn't give you any security..since a kick will take it right out.

Sorry if I missed this part...but are you looking for security or privacy? It looks like its got a big frosted glass panel..so the security part is moot.
 
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Old 04-30-10, 03:05 PM
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That frosted door is actually only one of the doors I have - it's security I'm after. To clarify: I do understand that someone could just kick the door open. That I'm not so concerned about. That makes noise - and I'll hear it. It's giving an outsider the chance of entering without making noise that concerns me. Also, if someone "breaks" to enter, they leave a trace. I had someone pick a lock in my back-door and set my alarm off. The police came...the door was open...but since there was no visible sign of a break-in, I was out $200 bucks for the "false alarm". Ridiculous, I know. But an indoor-locking dead-bolt will save me that hassle in the future.

"Primary" means of entry. RStripe probably did mean that. Toldja I was missing something.

I actually never even thought of taking the key lock off the one patio door. I suppose I could since, like you, I usually do not enter the house that way. In any case, I think RStripe's question may have diverted things anyway - since my initial question was NOT about putting a key lock on these doors, it was about supplementing the existing keyed with a key-less deadbolt lock on the door (for the above reasons). I could take the keyed lock off - but I'd think a inside-locking deadbolt by itself isn't as a deadbolt PLUS a keyed lock. Someone would have to pick and kick (or kick harder). The key-lock question came up when someone suggested I just install that kinda lock in place of something that may interfere with my trim.

Which brings me to a whole other question. My patio doors aren't wood. So even if I were to put something kind of sliding deadbolt on those doors (they don't have the trim issue)...what do I screw them into? I imagine there's got to be some kind of standard wood support bar near the locks.

Oh, and thanks for the reply!
 
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Old 05-02-10, 03:18 PM
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I guess the simple answer here (and most cost effective), but least practical in my opinion, would be to break off a key in the outside keyhole and apply superglue to the face of the keyway profile.

That way, no one could use the keyhole as it exists now and you can only operate the lock from the inside.

Probably the cheapest option, but not necessarily the best.
 
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Old 05-03-10, 06:41 PM
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Sorry I was mis-understood....Firstly, the one-sided deadbolt:
Without the backplate, the one slight advantage is that the bad guy doesn't know it's there, but a peek thru the glass will reveal the thumbturn location, and a small sharpened screwdriver can then be twisted quietly thru the wood, only needing to penetrate 1/4" - 3/8" , then used to unlock the bolt. I see you have a metal-clad door, so while this is a great improvement, residential metal cladding is very soft and thin, and so you are still better off with a wrought-metal or brass back plate.

Secondly, one bolt or two? The weak link is the glass, be it doors or windows (I don't see any burglar bars), so one well-installed deadbolt is generally sufficient, so long as you replace the usually too-short strike plate screws with ones that can penetrate into the first wall stud, (usually 2-3".)
 
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Old 05-03-10, 07:15 PM
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Thirdly, Global has cut to the chase on why I was asking if you use this door as your primary entry door when you come home....if you simply do not need a key entry here, you can easily eliminate the keyhole as a means of entry. Global's advice is the quickest & easiest.

There is a little trick you can do if you anticipate wanting to return the lock to normal key operation at some point, without having to clean out superglue....your local smithy can cut you a special "key" (we call it a "lock-out tip") for the price of a duplicate key.....a deep "back-cut" is made with the key machine, near a key blank's tip, then the key is cut straight off about 5/8" from the tip. This piece is then inserted in the lock with a poke tool (paperclip, whatever) as far as it will go.

This effectively blocks any key or lock-pick from opening the lock. When you want to remove it, simply unscrew the lock from the door, remove the tailpiece, and with a poke tool push the tip on out thru the back of the keyway.
 
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Old 05-03-10, 07:42 PM
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Finally, if you still want to install a surface-applied slide bolt or similar, the wood reinforcing block used for supporting the locks usually extends at least 2 or 3" above the deadbolt and 2 or 3" below the knob lock, and 4-5" back from the edge. A styrofoam filler is typically used elsewhere. Place the add-on bolt between the knoblock & deadbolt and you're bound to hit the wood block.
 
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Old 05-25-10, 03:31 PM
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Thanks all for all the awesome help as usual. I ended up going with the one-sided dead-bolts on all my doors...AND then went crazy and had a hi-end locks put in, too. Guess I'm covered!
 
 

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