Securing a Double-Hung Window...

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  #1  
Old 12-11-11, 07:14 PM
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Question Securing a Double-Hung Window...

Hello! I have a double-hung/ double sash window which I am trying to secure. I don't want anyone to be able to push the outside/top window down. What type of device can I use to secure this window? I already tried everything at the local hardware store. Thanks!
 
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Old 12-12-11, 10:23 AM
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You're kidding, right? The standard turn button in the middle of the middle of the top part of the lower sash prevents BOTH sashes from moving. For additional restraints you can drill some small holes through the face of the lower sash top rail into (not through) the upper sash lower rain and drop in some nails to pin both sashes together. Or add some blocking above the lower sash track and below the upper sash track and secure with screws. Lots of ways to secure double hung windows.
 
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Old 12-12-11, 12:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Furd View Post
You're kidding, right? The standard turn button in the middle of the middle of the top part of the lower sash prevents BOTH sashes from moving. For additional restraints you can drill some small holes through the face of the lower sash top rail into (not through) the upper sash lower rain and drop in some nails to pin both sashes together. Or add some blocking above the lower sash track and below the upper sash track and secure with screws. Lots of ways to secure double hung windows.
The standard turn button is very easy to unturn when someone places a large flat knife between the upper and lower sash. This is what I read online. I am currently using some blocking in the track above the lower sash. However, if I used this same method to block the upper sash the crook could simply remove the blockage by lifting up the outer screen. That is where the problem lies. Let me know if I am missing something.
 
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Old 12-12-11, 01:20 PM
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What are the windows made of? Wood is very easy to secure with some nails and a drilled hole. There are also replacement latches that would have to be broken off before they can be defeated.
 
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Old 12-12-11, 04:01 PM
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If someone really wanted in, glass is really easy to break. Don't go overboard on securing the weakest link in your house's security system. Pin stops are the best to "tie" the two sashes together, like the others have said.
 
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Old 12-12-11, 04:51 PM
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Exactly, Chandler... if someone wants in a window he will get in, doesn't take much effort to break glass... hammer, rock or fist.

The old fashioned way to secure window sashes was with a window sash spring bolt. (Google: "window sash spring bolts") They were installed in the center of the sash, just in front of the glass.
 
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Old 12-12-11, 05:38 PM
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Will a window sash spring bolt work on newer vinyl windows? I am assuming you will need to drill through the vinyl and into the pine.
 
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Old 12-12-11, 05:43 PM
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no, they are meant for wood windows. There is not enough material in front of the glass for a spring bolt to work if the window is vinyl. You should probably just consider using a couple white headed self tapping screws near the top of the sash. There is surely a place where you could place a couple screws through the top lip and into the top edge of the top sash to secure it.

There are also security locks that have a button you must push before you turn the cam. Here is one example.

Strybuc dot com also has pushbutton sweep locks: Truth #50-762 lock and a
50-415-3 lock. You would need the matching keepers, and if you are replacing and existing sweep lock you would want to try to use the same hole spacing. Can't guarantee any of these would work with your window since I can't see it or measure it.
 

Last edited by XSleeper; 12-12-11 at 06:01 PM.
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Old 12-18-11, 03:14 PM
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There are multiple different varieties of sash window bolts. You could try a simple window wedge. Cheap option and sufficient.

For locks you could try sash bolts which are a standard key operated threaded spindle that screws into a front bezel and secures into the rear sash. They usually sell in a six pack with 1 key included.
 
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Old 12-18-11, 03:18 PM
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here is a youtube video of a sash lock (slightly different to what I was recommending) in use...

Sash Window Locks a.k.a. "Sash Stops" - YouTube
 
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Old 12-18-11, 03:21 PM
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Here is a link to the actual lock I was originally recommending. This is a site in UK but essentially explains the application

Yale P119 Sash Window Bolt x6
 
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