Installing door knobs

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  #1  
Old 02-05-12, 03:17 AM
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Installing door knobs

Hello,

I've read a lot of guides to installing door knobs on the internet and I think I'm ready (need to drill etc for a door with no holes).

But before I do so, does anyone have any tips from personal experience?

One question/concern I may have is how to find the wooden block in a door that is hollow at other parts.

Oh, and I'm planning to install the Brava door knobs... if there's anything I should know about them.

Cheers
 
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  #2  
Old 02-05-12, 04:02 AM
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Have you bought a door lock installation kit, yet?? Makes it too easy to install them. You'll need to match the height in the rest of the house. That is to say, I am not sure what height doors you have, but generally if there is a center rail, the knob it centered on it. The kit will position the lockset's depth for you.
 
  #3  
Old 02-05-12, 04:09 AM
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Yeah I have it all.

But I mainly would like tips on drilling the holes in the door (middle/side and front) and chiseling out the side and the common mistakes of course.

Thanks heaps
 
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Old 02-05-12, 10:51 AM
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I don't understand middle side and front. The kit has a template you attach to the door and the hole bit bores half way through until the pilot sticks out the other side. You move to the other side of the door and insert the pilot in the hole and complete the hole. In the kit is a 1" paddle bit that will be used to bore the latch hole through to the main hole. Done.
You mentioned "chiseling". If you are talking about the inset for the strike mechanism, then you would insert the strike mechanism and trace around it on the door. Do the same for the striker plate on the frame once you have installed the lock. Use a razor knife to trace the lines you drew down to a depth of about 3/16 inch. Then use a 1" sharp chisel to remove the wood. A sharp chisel won't require a hammer. A less than sharp one will. Start in the middle of the hole and work to the sides until you get to your razor lines.
 
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Old 02-06-12, 11:32 PM
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Are you using the Brava Tie Bolt or Cylindrical?

I presume it will be tie-bolt. As previously said, there will be templates to follow.
51mm hole saw drilled 60mm from door edge. First one side then the other to make a clean cut.

24mm spade bit in center of door edge, in line with center of hole saw hole.
Use a 25mm wood chisel for top and bottom of latch plate and cut in about 3mm deep. Use same chisel to cut sides of latch plate.

Strike will need 25mm spade bit for hole, only about 20mm deep. Use wood chisel to measure and cut in strike edges about 3mm deep.

She'll be right mate!
 
  #6  
Old 02-06-12, 11:35 PM
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Actually I'm using cylindrical fixing. It's cheaper :P

Cheers for the info
 
  #7  
Old 02-12-12, 08:02 AM
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By the way,

What are the differences between cylindrical and tiebolt fixing?

I know what they look like, but what is the advantage, say, for tiebolt over cylindrical?

My guess is that tiebolt takes up less room, but there has to be more to it than that. And indeed I think cylindrical are fire rated, whereas tie bolt is not?

Please advise.

Thanks heaps
 
  #8  
Old 02-12-12, 06:17 PM
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I think it has to do with the quantity of oxygen that can get in though a tie-bolt fixing as opposed to a cylindrical fixing (I am not sure though), as to the fire rating.

A cylindrical requires a 51mm cross bore hole, where as a tie-bolt does not necessarily require the same.

Some tie-bolt locksets (for 51mm cross bores) have a sleeve that fits in the cross bore hole, designed to prevent the wrenching effect.

Cylindrical locks have a lot more that can and does (often) go wrong, especially with the backset (latch mechanism) often failing. Dont get me wrong, tie-bolt latches also fail but usually not as often (in my experience).

This is one of the reasons I really like the Serrature Meroni handlesets. They are all tie-bolt, but there is no lever handle or knob to turn ever so wear is considerably less.

Do a search online for Serrature Meroni Combina or Pigio or Nova or Forma and you might be able to see what I am talking about.

I am about to replace all the handles and knobs on all the doors in my house with Meroni. Just havent decided which versions to use yet. Beauty is, they can be keyed up to C4 easily. I do believe some restricted profiles are available too ( I am working on getting a Bilock cylinder to be made for them too).

The advantage of tie-bolt over cylindrical, in my opinion is tie bolt are easier to install and service than cylindrical.
 
  #9  
Old 02-12-12, 10:10 PM
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Those handlesets look cool.

Do you know where I could buy them in Australia?

Cheers
 
  #10  
Old 02-14-12, 10:28 PM
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Most leads outsode italy seem to be coming to me lately. Dunno why exactly. I am happy to send 'em to you.
 
  #11  
Old 03-20-12, 06:47 AM
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There was a company in Oz that was distributing them but no more. If you want me to get them for you, Italy will ship direct to Oz, it is cheaper than shipping through the USA.
 
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