What to look for in a deadbolt

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  #1  
Old 05-06-12, 05:48 PM
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What to look for in a deadbolt

Id like to install some quality deadbolts throughout the external doors to my house for enhanced security. Not sure where to start. Is there a size, material preference, number of bolts etc?
 
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Old 05-06-12, 10:09 PM
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I am not an expert on deadbolts but I have installed a few over the years. I personally like the Kwikset brand because they now have the Smart Key technology that will allow you to rekey the lock without taking it apart. I have heard though that other manufacturers are already following Kwikset and have a lock like that too. Other than that though there are different lengths of bolts depending on whether you have a standard installation in your current door or not. Some people like Schlage too and we have had their locks and they are not bad. Like with any manufacturer though there are different grades of locks within different manufacturers. Kwikset is cheaper than most but fairly easy to install than other brands but may or may not be what you are looking for it just depends on what your budget is and what you can afford.
As to whether that re-keying technology is safe or not there is some debate about that but I have never had any problems myself. Any new locks I get though will be with the new Smart Key technology but that is my personal preference and other people will give you their own advice. I am not a locksmith but watched plenty of locks being re-keyed in the past and did it myself for a long time with varying degrees of success and wouldn't want to do any more re-keying but also understand the need to have a lock re-keyed sometimes very fast. So there are many different types and qualities I suggest you go to a locksmiths shop in your area and not one of those big box stores and ask them which one they recommend. They might be a bit more as far as price is concerned but they also will have better quality locks too. Unfortunately they are harder to find now but when you do you will get better service. Good luck in you search!
 
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Old 05-07-12, 03:26 AM
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To further hedgeclipper's comments, look for a deadbolt with a central rolling pin embedded in the end of the lock. It prevents the bolt from being cut with a hacksaw or reciprocating type saw.
Schlage probably has the best locking system, although as hedge said, the new rekeying feature is super handy and allows you to use the existing keys to rekey them.
Now, if you want to frighten yourself, google "key bump". You will see some locksets are more vulnerable to entry than others.
 
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Old 05-07-12, 06:09 AM
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The door and jamb are often the weakest part of the entry system so make sure you beef them up as well or someone could just kick open your newly expensively locked door.
 
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Old 05-07-12, 06:40 AM
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Thanks everyone, this is just what I was looking for. Ok, will make some notes.. And I happen to have a local locksmith that I'm going to pay a visit to. I like the smart key technology, don't won't to spend a fortune but want to get something of good quality, have 4 doors to cover. Tis is really helpful. Will look for something with a central rolling pin embedded as until noted.

Chandler - lol, I'll havep to google that. I seem to remember something i saw in a movie using a tennis ball on a car door.

Mitch17 - I was thinking the same thing about the rest of the door! Ok thanks. I'll look into that too. Won't meet my overall needs if the door itself isn't right..

Bryan
 
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Old 05-08-12, 08:15 PM
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Top security, widest range of quality finishes, best durability; all that will cost you the big bucks, and is not part of the big box shopping experience....a major full-line locksmith can advise you here tho, if that's what you want.

The best bang for the buck on a limited budget to offer "reasonable" security would be the best lock the big box has to offer with an aftermarket security strike plate, (there are several brands/models....see your smithy).

As for SmartKey and it's variants, when they were introduced several years ago, some were vulnerable to specialized forms of attack with common tools, and would sometimes jam when attempting to re-key. Unless improvements have been made in the last several years, or you really need the ability to re-key often, I'd hesitate before getting them. And you don't have to use SmartKey etc. to obtain a "bump" resistant lock.
 
  #7  
Old 05-14-12, 10:34 PM
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The bump resistance factor is moot if you go for a restricted key system. A restricted key system provides almost total key control and therefore natural bump resistance.

The inability to obtain restricted key duplicates secures and protects your premises from unauthorised entry and the ability for unauthorised persons to obtain a key to make into a bump key.

In the USA, there are two accepted brands that are 100% bump proof. Abloy and Bilock.

The other posters have given excellent advice. It really doesnt matter which deadbolt you use if the frame casing is not reinforced.
 
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Old 05-16-12, 02:19 AM
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When I gave my advise I forgot all about the frame and the others are right I bought a product called the Strikemaster II from the Home Depots website and I am pleased it is still available. We had gypsy con men go to our house and they had went into our house. I thought they might come back and rob us so I bought three for all of our outside doors. They are tough and unless your door is real flimsy and hollow I guarantee no one will ever break into your house. They would need a battering ram to get in. Here is the link to what I bought Door Frame and Hinge Reinforcement-55724 at The Home Depot . You can install this on a basement door but will need special concrete anchors and don't look for it in the store they don't have it so you must order it online. They are fairly easy to install unless your door wasn't hung very well and then you might need to shave some wood off of the edge of the door. If you Google the manufacturers name you can find a video there that shows you exactly how much stronger your door will be. I know it is true because I tried to kick in our door and the frame survived. I did it on purpose because I wanted to be sure it would work. Good luck to you!
 
  #9  
Old 05-23-12, 03:52 AM
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Yes. i have been selling and installing the Strikemaster II product for about 5 years now and it is a top quality product that is inexpensive, made in the USA and does the intended job easily and aesthetically. In fact, I install many Strikemaster II's to people's doors after they have been broken into, completely repairing a broken jamb without the need to replace the door or frame and securing the frame better than before.

In my area, the average contractor will replace a door and frame for around $1500.00 supplied and installed. But using the Strikemaster II, I can usually completely repair a frame in about a half hour at a total cost of about $150.00.

I was selling this product in the days before the big box stores came in to undercut us small businesses. BTW..... the Strikemaster II is only available at the big box stores by special order (online) and the cost is the same as from most independent small businesses.
 
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