Medeco Srike Plate Instalation


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Old 03-02-13, 04:52 PM
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Medeco Srike Plate Instalation

Just bought a Maxum 11WC60L Deadbolt and it looks formidable. It even comes with two sets of strike plates but with no reference on which to use and why.
What I need at this point is installation instruction for the strike plates that are included. One is a plate box with inside slanted holes for the screws with a matching finish plate with small screws provided, the other is a plasticc box with a metal surface plate with 4 holes. Which do I use and how?
No reference at all to these details in the instructions.
 
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Old 03-02-13, 09:09 PM
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Generally, it's the length of the screws used to fasten the plate, more than the shape of the plate itself, that determines the security. The steel cup strike with the angled holes in the bottom would theoretically be better in cases where the first wall stud is relatively far from the door frame, whereas the flat plate would suffice where the stud is relatively close.

Actually, the best strike plates are rarely included with a new lock; There are some good aftermarket plates that are very long, with multiple screw holes using very long screws. The longer plate will resist a kick-in better, as it is able to distribute the load over a wider surface area of the stud.

The main objection to the long strikes is the time required to neatly mortise it into the frame...but if you've got sufficient clearance, and don't mind a less-than -perfect installation, you can simply surface mount it.

Make sure it's not so long it encroaches on the latch strike though.
 
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Old 03-03-13, 06:40 PM
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Oh, and because the screws need to be long enough to dig into the wall stud, once the screws snug the plate to the door frame, do not continue to tighten;
In many cases, due to poor construction, inadequate shimming between door frame and stud will allow the frame to bow or "pull away" from the door edge, creating an unsightly and unnecessary gap.
 
 

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