How to treat wood in lock hole in a garden door?

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  #1  
Old 05-22-13, 06:07 PM
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How to treat wood in lock hole in a garden door?

I am trying to install a lock on a garden door.
I bought a redwood board in Home Depot.
The salesman told me that I do not need a treated wood for a garden door and that redwood is naturally rot resistant to some extent.
I am planning to use a cheap Defiant Door Knob Set.
So, I drilled holes in the board and ready to insert the lock.

Now I wonder whether it makes sense to treat the wood in the hole.
All DIY sites explain how to install locks on interior doors and do not mention the problem of water and rot.
But for a garden door it is very likely that water will enter that hole and stay there for days, so the wood should rot faster on the inside than on exterior surfaces.
I have some Copper-Green Wood Preservative left from my previous project, so I can easily soak the wood in the hole with it.
But then I recall that chemically treated wood is corrosive and requires certain kind of nails and other metal parts.
So, I wonder whether Copper-Green will cause lock corrosion.

So, the first question is whether it is really needed to treat a hole in a redwood board.
The second question is whether the wood preservative will cause any problem with the lock.

Thank you
 
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  #2  
Old 05-22-13, 06:32 PM
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No such thing as a "garden door", If this is just an outside gate why not just a latch?
Got a picture of what it is your really trying to do?
Why would you a copper lace preserver to cedar?
 
  #3  
Old 05-22-13, 07:04 PM
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> No such thing as a "garden door",

It is just a side door, which leads from the street to back yard (AKA garden). Google has plenty of pictures for "garden door", so I decided to use that term.

> If this is just an outside gate why not just a latch?

It already has a latch, but there were numerous burglaries recently, where intruders first entered the back yard through the side door (latch cannot stop them). So, I need to install a real standard keyed lock.

> Why would you a copper lace preserver to cedar?

First of all, it was called "Redwood", not "Cedar".
Second: I do not know. This is my question. Do I need to use preservative or not?

If you search this forum you will find a post, where a person got rotten wood behind a lock or strike plate, so some treatment may be necessary to prevent this situation.
 
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Old 05-22-13, 07:55 PM
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I doubt you would need to treat the wood. The lock will rust out and freeze up long before the wood rots. Most of the internal lock parts are just plain steel and will rust in the direct weather like that.
 
  #5  
Old 05-22-13, 08:28 PM
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> Most of the internal lock parts are just plain steel and will rust in the direct weather like that.

Thank you for your answer.

But are there locks designed for outdoor use?
I cannot find anything promising in Home Depot.
On the Web I see things like "Gate deadbolt", but it does not say whether it is rust resistant or not. May be it is no better than a regular deadbolt?
 
  #6  
Old 05-23-13, 04:49 AM
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Have you considered a slide bolt with a padlock?
btw - welcome to the forums!
 
  #7  
Old 05-23-13, 09:13 AM
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> Have you considered a slide bolt with a padlock?

I am coming through that door several times a day. When I exit, I need to lock from outside. When I enter, I need to lock from inside. So, a standard deadbolt or keyed knob will work for me, but I cannot imagine how a keyed latch or a padlock can work.
Assuming that padlocks and latches are water/rust resistant, there must be water/rust resistant deadlocks/knobs, right? Where can I find one?
 
  #8  
Old 05-23-13, 09:47 AM
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If you are just putting a cheap Defiant on there....who cares if it only lasts 2 or 3 years? It's a 10 min job to replace it and probably less than $15?

You are in N Cal...so probably quite a bit wetter (from what I remember) than me, but I've had an normal exterior door deadbolt and an INTERIOR door latch handle on a security gate from my back yard to the alley for over 6 yrs. I give it a squirt of dry lube (not WD40) every year or so. And other than the clear coat protective finish flaking off on the handle...it works just fine.

If it failed, I'd replace it with another el-cheapo. Mine are stainless steel not the brass or antique brass finish.

We do get several weeks of heavy rains and showers year round except in the heat of summer. We also get snow and freezing temps...never had a problem.

Don't worry about treating the redwood...though I don't know how the tannins in the wood may affect the metal of the lockset. Cedar is worse I think.
 
  #9  
Old 05-23-13, 10:33 AM
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> cheap Defiant ....who cares if it only lasts 2 or 3 years

I agree.
My original question was about the wood, not the lock. Considering how much effort I made drilling and chiseling, more drilling and more chiseling, I really want to make this board last longer than 2 years.
But if you think that redwood does not require treatment, then I will do nothing.
Thank you
 
  #10  
Old 05-24-13, 09:05 PM
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It's generally not considered necessary to treat the wood coring, but even if you did, to prolong the lifetime of the installation, the treatment would not accelerate the locks' normal deterioration rate from the elements to any great extent.

However, by installing a Grade 2 or even a Grade 1 lockset (the cheap big box locks are usually Grade 3) the heavier-duty construction & thicker guage metal chassis will last much longer in the elements. Of course, they are more expensive, but do offer a little more security as well.
 
  #11  
Old 05-26-13, 08:49 PM
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> by installing a Grade 2 or even a Grade 1 lockset
> ... will last much longer in the elements.

Interesting. I was not aware that locks have grades. I did not notice any grades when looking at locks in Home depot. Now I searched the Web and see that lock grades define different levels of security and durability, but not a word about rust resistance. Some locks say that their pins are made from stainless steel, so we should assume that other parts are made from regular steel and will rust (like PJmax wrote before).

But, as Gunguy45 wrote, replacing a lock is easy and cheap, so who cares?

But wood board is much more precious than lock, considering the effort necessary to drill and chisel the lock hole. That drilling and chiseling across the grain left so many rough surfaces, which will, probably, absorb water like sponge. So, I am still tempted to treat the hole some way, may be just with paint, if not copper green.
 
  #12  
Old 05-27-13, 04:59 AM
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Do you plan to apply any type of stain to the rest of the door? If so, I'd use the same stain on the cutout section. Unstained wood will turn grey over time, if you are ok with this - make sure none of your sealer gets on the exposed part of the door or it may affect how it weathers.
 
  #13  
Old 05-27-13, 08:51 AM
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> Do you plan to apply any type of stain to the rest of the door?

The door itself is old and grey (a typical side door). I do not know whether it had any treatment. Now I am attaching a new redwood board with the lock across that old door.
 
  #14  
Old 05-27-13, 12:45 PM
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Given time and weather the new board will turn grey like the old. If you want the old to look new again, you'll need to wash it with a bleach/water solution. If it cleans up good you can apply a coat of redwood toner or translucent stain to all the wood to preserve it. If the old doesn't clean up real well you might want to a semi-transparent stain instead.

Redwood has a lot of natural preservatives in the wood so applying a stain is optional - it's mostly about personal preference.
 
  #15  
Old 05-27-13, 07:19 PM
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Thank you for the explanation, but it is really off-topic.
I asked how to prevent surfaces of lock hole from soaking up water and rotting, not how to stain anything. If you think that redwood will not rot, then I will leave the lock hole untreated and unpainted.
 
  #16  
Old 05-28-13, 11:47 PM
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you might consider the gate locks made deliberately by D & D technologies. They rudimentarily designed for use on gates.

DD Technologies
 
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