Looking to replace lock on commercial door with 'buzz in' system

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  #1  
Old 02-03-14, 06:03 PM
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Question Looking to replace lock on commercial door with 'buzz in' system

Hi everyone. Sorry for the terminology, but I'm looking to replace a lock on a commercial door with a 'buzz in' system where the office administrator can buzz in the person at the door, from her desk.

I've attached a picture of the door lock. The client is looking to have this done this Saturday.

Thanks in advance for your help.
 
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Old 02-03-14, 08:06 PM
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Because local building & fire codes vary so much around the country, and there are a dozen ways to accomplish your goal, I advise you to get a few bids from your local locksmiths, who are familiar with the local codes. This will narrow it down to a few choices, which I would be happy to evaluate.

Each solution has it's advantages & disadvantages, & we could go back & forth on any one, only to find that, in YOUR area, this one is not permitted.

I will say that in MOST jurisdictions, a one-motion manual-egress, fail-secure, ADA compliant, low-voltage device will fly. The preferred solution in our area is the "electric panic device", but again, check with your local smithys to see what choices they offer.
 
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Old 02-03-14, 08:16 PM
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BTW, your terminology is just fine...the "Buzzer Lock" actually originated in New York about 100+ years ago, for walk-up apartments ("flats"...GL). Back then the only low voltage power source readily available was the 16-18 VAC doorbell transformer, which, when used to operate the early electric strikes on these entrance doors, produced a 60-cycle "Buzz" noise. Nowadays, DC voltage is almost always used, producing a "click" noise. AC strikes are still avail. & I'm sure, in your part of the country, many are still operating.
 
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Old 02-03-14, 08:33 PM
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One more caution, be sure and ask your local contractor whether a city permit is required to do this....even down here in freedom-loving Texas most cities are starting to require permits for electric access controls, so it's probably a given that you'll need one in New York, (unless you're in the county). It adds to the cost, so that low-ball bid you get may be because that contractor plans to not obtain one. If you ask about it, they'll be less likely to forgo it.
 
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Old 02-04-14, 07:48 AM
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Thanks for the tips and info guys.
 
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Old 02-04-14, 10:13 AM
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Almost any system you choose may require a licensed electrician to sign off that the works completed meet local building codes (assuming you go for a hard wired system).

Alternative products that are wireless include the fabulous battery powered electric strike made by Lock Focus. You will need to replace the existing Adams Rite 1850 with a 4700 or 4800, then install the battery electric strike to the jamb. It has a keypad that mounts o the mullion for external access and you can get a wired release button that can be operated by admin. Standard length cables are 10' long, but you can get a 50' long cable on special request.

The battery powered electric strike sells for $460.00 (retail). A 4700/4800 sells for about $110.00. You will need either a paddle for inside or a latch handle too they vary around $50-$80 retail.

All that above does not include your door bell or intercom either.
 
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Old 02-04-14, 10:22 AM
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While an electric strike is probably the better option, with replacing the existing lock to a latching lock, you could choose to install a trilogy narrow Stile access lock, but I am not sure they come with a remote release. They cost around $800.00 and are wireless. You'd still need a buzzer/bell or intercom.

perhaps the smarter option might be to consider installing a magnetic lock at the top. Hard wired to the exit sign above the door. I have also installed a wireless transmitter with a fob to release the maglock, on a jewellery store, about 5 years ago and it works very well and has held up even in this cold snap.

whichever way you choose to go, there are options, but remember that hard wiring anything in a commercial location is required to meet or exceed building code. Building code has a set of universal guidelines but can be subject to the local AHJ (Authority Having Jurisdiction)
 
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Old 02-05-14, 09:24 PM
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More food for thought: Most cities around here have adopted some version of the "International Building Codes" and you can review them online with a google search. The sections affecting you would be 1008.1.9.8 & 1008.1.9.9

Of course, each local Authority then has the option of "interpreting" (changing) any part of the code as they see fit, but most changes are minor. And if you use an electromechanical (rather than electromagnetic) lock, for which egress (exit) is accomplished by pushing a "paddle" or "panic-exit device" (crash-bar), or turning a lever handle, most of the restrictions listed in the code do not apply. Again, at least in our area.
 
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Old 02-05-14, 09:31 PM
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Great responses, thank you very much!!
 
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