Cannot remove door lock for bedroom

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  #1  
Old 05-17-14, 09:09 AM
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Cannot remove door lock for bedroom

This morning, I couldn't open the door of my bedroom, so I started to remove the lock and the pictures are showing what is left. The door is still locked. Can you please help by telling me how to remove what's left?Name:  CAM00585.jpg
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  #2  
Old 05-17-14, 09:46 AM
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Welcome to the forums.

Use a small screwdriver in square hole and slide the piece in the direction of the arrow. That should allow you to open the door. Once the door is open you'll see the two screws that hold the latch plate in the door.

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Last edited by PJmax; 05-17-14 at 12:20 PM.
  #3  
Old 05-17-14, 09:54 AM
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Looks like there may be some burrs or damage on the latch. May have to apply some force to push it back.


Hmmm, ya know, I think it actually pushes towards the edge of the door to open, not away from it. Look at the wear marks on the end of the "plunger" and how the brass locking rod goes into the notch.
 
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Old 05-17-14, 01:21 PM
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I tried the suggestion of pjmax and it did not work. Then I pushed it towards the edge of the door and yes, it can push inside but it also didn't work. I don't know what to do.
 
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Old 05-17-14, 01:38 PM
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Did it not move at all, or did it move but not unlatch?

Do you have access to the room by different means? On an interior door, you may be able to take a putty knife and slide it in at the latch and slowly push it back a bit at a time.

I kinda think something has broken in there since it is not fully latched nor fully open...based on the position of the locking notch.

You may wind up using a hacksaw blade or a power tool and cutting that housing right down through the numbers.

EDIT...oops, I see where it did move. Did it move quite a bit? Like 1/2"...or just a little bit?
 
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Old 05-17-14, 01:54 PM
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As you can see on the picture, I can push towards the edge of the door, but it did not unlatch.
I have access to the 2 sides of the door.
So you want that I buy a putty knife and that I insert it on the left side of the picture? Sorry, I'm french so my English is not perfect.
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  #7  
Old 05-17-14, 02:03 PM
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Yes, a stiff putty knife or any similar tool. Even a butter knife may work. You want to start at the far left, and try to pry the latch back towards the door. You may need 2 tools, one to hold it as you reposition the one you are prying with.

Look at another door in the home and you'll get an idea of what I mean.

I've never seen a latch that functions like that one. Could you possible take a pic of the edge of the door on a functioning latch? No disassembly...just as it sits.
 
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Old 05-17-14, 02:07 PM
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Oh crud....what am I thinking. if you have access to both sides, you may be able to pop out the hinge pins and get enough room to remove the whole door.
 
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Old 05-17-14, 02:33 PM
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You're supposed to move the catch AWAY from the edge of the door as shown in this picture and my first one.

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Old 05-17-14, 02:40 PM
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I really don't think so PJ. Look at the design of the moon shaped actuator in the handle and the wear marks on the surface of the "plunger". As well as the position of the notch for the brass locking pin.

All those seem to indicate that it is latched and lockable when it's in the out position don't they?
 
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Old 05-17-14, 03:18 PM
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That's not a dead bolt. It's a spring loaded passage lock. The spring keeps the latch out. When you close the door the latch hits the striker plate and slides in. To open the door you have to pull against the spring tension.
 
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Old 05-17-14, 03:37 PM
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I'm not arguing, really. I understand what you are saying and that's how most common latches work.

I'm just looking at what the pictures show and I don't see any possible way for the 1/2 moon shaped piece in the handle to actually push the plunger away from the latch (like a Kwikset does for instance). It can't fit because of the design, just look at it. And why would there be wear marks on the part of the plunger furthest away from the edge? And notice one wear mark is deeper than the other? That would be expected in the course of normal operation, pushing the lever down most of the time. I'll bet a picture of the 1/4 moon piece would show similar wear marks.

I'm wondering if this is a drive in latch and it has just slipped out so far that it can't release completely?

Miamiparis...sorry for the OT discussion.

Have you tried removing the pins? All it takes is a hammer or tapping tool of some sort and a punch, or even a large nail.
 

Last edited by Gunguy45; 05-18-14 at 09:14 AM.
  #13  
Old 05-18-14, 01:43 PM
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you have a Weslock lock on that door. The latch button needs to be pressed to the left, not the right. (Sorry PJ)

The diecasting has probably broken.....I suggest however that there is pressure on the latch, preventing it from moving. You need to wedge the door above the latch and below the latch to relieve the pressure on the bevelled latch mechanism. This may also allow you to use a putty kinfe to "loid" (slip) the latch. if it is a deadlatch, you may need to push the wedges harder to spread the jamb at least 1/4 inch to be able to move the mechanism.
 
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Old 05-18-14, 02:23 PM
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TY GL....I tried researching the lock...but since I didn't know what to look for, the results were useless.

Would supporting the door and popping the pins allow some additional clearance you think?
 
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Old 05-18-14, 09:04 PM
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As global said, that's an old Weslock, where the internal plunger moves toward the edge of the door...inside the latchtube is a reversing bellcrank that draws the latch in. The bellcrank is notorious for breaking when door misalignment binds the latch.

Removing the hinge pins will give you a little more gap between the door & frame.
 
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Old 05-19-14, 08:23 AM
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News

My dad didn't want that I tell him what you wrote here. So he did things by himself and he broke a part of the latch (see new pictures). I tried to remove the door hinge, but I couldn't.
What do you suggest now?
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Old 05-19-14, 08:26 AM
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Other pic

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Here is another pic
 
  #18  
Old 05-19-14, 09:26 AM
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spread the jamb with a door wedge, like already suggested. I use air bags (you could use the bladder from a football or basketball) pump it open until the gap is sufficiently wide enough to slip the latch back.

Another alternative that you could try....take a hydraulic jack, sit the base on a piece of wood against the hinge side of the jamb. use a piece of 4 x 2 on the jack end and wind the jack open until the 4 x 2 hits the lock side of the jamb. Continue winding the jack open until you create a sufficient enough gap the slip the latch.
 
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Old 05-24-14, 06:13 PM
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Finally

My parents finally succeeded today in removing the latch. They used pliers, a screwdriver and a hammer.
Should I buy the same latch and reinstall it with the actual handle or should I buy a better lock?
 
  #20  
Old 05-25-14, 03:00 PM
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Do not waste time looking for parts to this lock...buy a complete new lock. And if you plan on using this door often, avoid the cheaper big box selections....at the very least go with a Schlage Grade 2 lock, or for really heavy use see your local locksmith for better Grade 2 or even Grade 1 (commercial) locks.
 
  #21  
Old 05-26-14, 09:36 AM
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Weslock parts are generally hard to find anywhere but a locksmith shop. I agree with rstripe. Replace with something better. I am not a big fan of Schlage residential grade products. The Grade 2 are considered light duty commercial/heavy duty residential and are much better quality.
Weslock are great because the key outside only unlocks the lock and cannot lock it. The style of Weslock is aesthetically pleasing and the quality is reasonable and the competitive value is good too.
 
 

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