Kwikset locks

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  #1  
Old 02-12-15, 04:51 PM
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Kwikset locks

Hi All, I have a lockset in my garage that annoys me,is it possible to change the way it functions,which is the button on the inside must be turned in order to open the door.
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  #2  
Old 02-12-15, 06:46 PM
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Kwikset will usually stay unlocked once the button is turned. Schlage on the other hand, will remain locked until you turn the big knob to pop out the lock button. Is that the problem?
 
  #3  
Old 02-12-15, 07:52 PM
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Some Arrow locks have 3 positions that allow any combination of entry & exit. Kwicksets are nice inexpensive locks but if you want more bells & whistles, you'll have to upgrade.
 
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Old 02-13-15, 07:14 AM
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Yes, that's the problem,probably will have to upgrade to a different lock set at some point.
Geo
 
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Old 02-13-15, 07:47 AM
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It's a security feature so you don't lock yourself out.
 
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Old 02-13-15, 09:25 AM
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I realize that, but it is a bit annoying.
Geo
 
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Old 02-13-15, 09:54 AM
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Yep, I agree. That said, Kwikset figured you'd think it less annoying than being locked out because you could turn the inside knob when the door was locked. Schlages are the other way around.

I have Kwiksets on my house but since I have bolts and keyed entrance knobs, I just lock the bolts and leave the knobs unlocked all the time.
 
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Old 02-13-15, 01:20 PM
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Hi again, has anyone ever used these Primeline rekey kits?if so can I use an existing key for my other locks with these kits all Schlage locks
Geo
 
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Old 02-13-15, 01:48 PM
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Don't know that brand but some of the kits I've seen use non-standard pin lengths for different brands of locks so you are stuck using that key. Without knowing the lengths of the pins, I can only say maybe.

Another way, pins might change by 15/1000" in the name brand lock and keys but the after market kit might change by 20/1000" between pins so it would have pins which do not correspond to a stock key.
 
  #10  
Old 02-13-15, 01:49 PM
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I've used rekeying kits for Schlage locks but not the Primeline. The kits come with a pair of keys and six sets of the proper pins to change in the lock cylinder. Unless you want to purchase a complete kit of change pins (around $40 to $60 as I recall) you cannot rekey to a different key than is contained in the kit.
 
  #11  
Old 02-13-15, 02:02 PM
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Thanks, I figured that,I need 3keys for my situation, I may check out a locksmith to see if I can get a new lock set keyed to my existing locks.
Geo
 
  #12  
Old 02-13-15, 02:10 PM
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Certainly - done all the time. Typically no charge for this at the time of purchase or something in the neighborhood of pocket change.
 
  #13  
Old 02-16-15, 08:14 AM
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The Kwikset design has been around for at least 40 years that I know of, and is made that way because it was cheaper to produce.

Between the 2 types of entry locks we're talking about here, it seems there are just as many complaints about one type as the other. Good thing we have choices.
 
  #14  
Old 02-16-15, 09:47 AM
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I hope I'm not highjacking the original thread, but one thing about Schlage exterior locksets thoroughly confuses me. I've had a carpenter install two new exterior doors over the past two years. He used Schlage locksets on both, purchased from the same local lumberyard. Both locksets appear to be identical, but they obviously aren't. On one lockset, you can open the door from the inside WITHOUT turning the lock button to the unlocked position. This makes it all too easy to pull the door shut behind you, locking yourself out. However, on the identical-appearing Schlage lockset on the other door, you cannot open the door from the inside without first turning the lock button to the unlocked position, ensuring that you won't accidently lock yourself out.

I'd like to replace my other exterior locksets with Schlage locksets which will be keyed to match the two new doors. However, I want to make sure I get the Schlage version which requires you to first unlock the door button, before you can turn the knob, so I don't end up locking myself out. Any idea how to tell which model of Schlage the home improvement store has on the shelf?
 
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Old 02-16-15, 10:53 AM
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FWIW, I've never seen a Schlage keyed entrance knob that wouldn't allow you out from the inside even when locked.
 
  #16  
Old 02-16-15, 01:44 PM
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Beachboy, those 2 Schlage locks are probably identical. There are two positions on the inside button that both lock the door. One is pushing the button in & leaving it. The other is pushing the button & turning it at the same time. One way allows people who don't have their keys with them 100% of the time to get stuck outside & the other position prevents people who don't have their keys with them 100% of the time from getting stuck outside.

Those two positions also do something else. One position leaves the button in the same position when you enter with the key & the other pops the button out when you enter with the key. Arrow has the same features. When the button pops out, it has to be pushed in again, to relock the door.

PS The only time that I don't have my keys with me is when I'm in the shower & even then they are hanging on my belt, inside the bathroom.
 
  #17  
Old 02-16-15, 07:11 PM
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Curious. Like stickshift, I'm not aware of a Schlage entry function lock that allows the inner knob/lever to be locked. Does it have the Schlage name on the latchplate? (Other brands now use the Schlage type key, so you can't always tell by that).

Kwikset's Tylo design and it's clones are the only residential entry sets in recent history (in USA) where the inside knob actually locks. But these knob styles are quite different from Schlage's.
 
  #18  
Old 02-16-15, 07:53 PM
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My Schlage locksets are both the Georgian pattern, same antique brass color. The locking button in the middle of the knob turns (does not push in) 90 degrees to lock or unlock. On one lockset, when the button is in the lock position, the inside doorknob cannot be turned, so the door cannot be opened without first turning the button to the unlocked position. On the other seemingly-identical lockset, the inside doorknob can be used to exit regardless of the lock position. In one version, you are protected from locking yourself out, in the other version, you can exit (as in an emergency) without stopping to unlock the door. I asked a locksmith shop, and they said Schlage is available in both versions, but I'd rather buy new locksets at the big box stores, as they are 50% cheaper than the locksmith shop.
 
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Old 02-17-15, 04:44 AM
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I'm 100% sure that Arrow works the way I described. I can't believe that Schlage would be be behind the times.
 
  #20  
Old 02-17-15, 08:34 AM
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Your locksmith's advice is correct; I did a little digging and found that the usually-stocked function at big box stores is the "F51" entrance lock having the immediate exit feature, and is the function supplied in combination knob/deadbolt packaging.

The non-panic exit function (that you're looking for) is available in a stand-alone package only, and is a function "F54". They're not nearly as popular (maybe why stickshift and I have never encountered one in the field), but apparently some big box stores stock these as well.

Look very carefully on the packaging for the "F54", it's in fine print.

Also, lever designs are not avail. in the F54 function, but all F line knob locks are.
 
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Old 02-17-15, 08:35 AM
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Dang, that's some good info there, rstripe! Thanks.
 
  #22  
Old 02-17-15, 04:55 PM
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Thanks for the great info, rstripe! That makes my search much easier!
 
  #23  
Old 02-18-15, 06:38 PM
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Unfortunately, the internal slight mechanical difference between the 2 functions is not accessible to alter, because the F line of locks, being residential grade & therefore inexpensive, are stamped together as sub-assemblies, and you'd have to practically wreck it to take it apart.

Bummer.
(oops, my generation is showing)
 
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