Replace old Segal lock with smart/high tech option?

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  #1  
Old 03-09-15, 01:15 AM
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Red face Replace old Segal lock with smart/high tech option?

What are my options for replacing this old lock (below chain and deadbolt, above door handle) with a smart/high tech option like the Kevo Bluetooth? I live in an old, Victorian rental... so I'm limited in how drastic of a change I can make to the existing key/lock holes in the door.

The current lock doesn't work, so if I can't upgrade to a smart/high tech option, what are my options for replacing the cylinder, so we can get keys that actually work? Landlord insists deadbolt and interior chain are sufficient... but we'd really like the regular lock to work. IF replacing the cylinder is an option, how do I find the right one? (It doesn't look like the ones on the Segal website will work because they are for deadbolts??).

I'm looking for can-do commenters... I have the will, please help me find the way =).

Help? Yes please. Nay-sayers? No, thank you.
 
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  #2  
Old 03-09-15, 03:01 AM
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Welcome to the forums! Replacing the mortise lock with another is about the only way you will be able to secure the door. So much of the door has been eaten away by the mortising process a normal lock may not be a good solution. At least that will give you a latching capability. The deadbolt will give you lockable security.

Now, to the nay-saying. The key word in your post was "landlord". It is his responsibility to make changes to the structure. Your changing things will open yourself up to liability, and should be avoided. Insist on the lockset change.
 
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Old 03-10-15, 01:29 PM
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Thanks for the response, Chandler. Since it sounds like I'd better stick with the current system, do you know if replacing just the cylinder is an option? I've read those can be removed and taken to a locksmith for rekeying??
 
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Old 03-10-15, 04:58 PM
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Yes, the deadbolt can be rekeyed fairly easily. The mortise lock is a hit and miss, as there aren't that many key combinations out there. A good locksmith will have a ring of skeleton keys, one if which will fit, most likely. Not your securest of doors, but it works.
 
  #5  
Old 03-10-15, 07:32 PM
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As Chandler said, your main problem is you don't own the property, so first get an agreement with the owner about, for example, if you install an expensive lock, you can take it with you when you move, IF you don't alter the door so much the old lock can't be re-installed.

You didn't say what specifically doesn't work on the Segal lock...if the knobs and latch and lock buttons work fine, but the key won't turn, loosen the set screw and unscrew the cylinder (you may need to loosen the lock body screws as well) and take it to your local locksmith so he can evaluate whether it would be cheaper to repair or replace. A replacement generic cylinder with new keys is cheap, but if you MUST use the same key, it could cost more.

If the lock has more serious problems, I'd see if some lubrication might fix it first, but in any event, realize that it's not worth putting too much $ into it, if increased security is your main goal; this is a spring-latch lock only, giving only token security compared to the deadbolt.

If you don't mind shelling out some serious coin, AND you have said agreement with owner, this should be a standard residential-size mortise lock, meaning the edge-cut dimensions in the door are standard, but the cross-bore holes will vary slightly from brand to brand. If you replace the entire lock with a latch & deadbolt combination you will have 2 deadbolts, with added security.

Baldwin will probably have your largest selection if finishes/functions/trim configurations, etc. BUT you must take carefull measurements of existing lock to compare new specs. In most cases, a new mortise lock that uses "escutcheons" surrounding the knobs/levers/cylinder will cover up crossbore holes that don't match new locks that do not use escutcheons.

One step further, if you do spend some $$$ for new mortise lock with deadbolt, it would be worth it to replace the stock key-cylinder with a "high-security" type cylinder for pick-resistance and registered key (non-duplicable)

And a nostalgic note: That's a fine old Segal lock, probably 60 to 80 years old.
If it were mine, I'd overhaul it with care, maybe a little Brasso, and with proper lubrication/use give it another 50 years.
 
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Old 03-11-15, 03:02 AM
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You know, I was looking at the Segal as the deadbolt, not seeing the keyed lockset. No skeleton keys Sorry for the confusion. Yes, you have a fine lock, but it offers minimal protection. The deadbolt offers more. Care should be taken in working on the Segal, as you don't want to have to replace it.
 
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Old 03-11-15, 11:30 AM
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personally I believe that the old Segal lock on your door is far better quality and more secure than the el cheapo cylindrical deadbolt you have there. If you want to prevent the cylinder from being easily changed (rekeyed), purchase a high security restricted keyway cylinder....usually only available from locksmiths directly. that will perplex any key cutter, hardware store or other locksmith no end.
 
  #8  
Old 03-12-15, 06:30 PM
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Oh, and chains are next to worthless, at least the garden variety like you have.

A swift kick and the chain will break or the screws pull out, or pull a piece of the trim moulding off. Because a chain can allow lots of door movement, a kick allows a "head start" that results in tremendous force on a chain when it reaches it's maximum length.
 
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