Can I just replace the cylinder of this lock?

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  #1  
Old 04-05-15, 05:20 PM
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Can I just replace the cylinder of this lock?

Hi,

I recently purchased a condo and I was given the old keys and I just wanted to change the locks.

I heard that I could just change the cylinder of the lock though I'm not certain what lock is even in there.

Here are a few pictures of the current lock:

http://i.imgur.com/8rL5YUe.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/JoV0Fkq.png
http://i.imgur.com/iHexkCV.png
http://i.imgur.com/UbclPnA.jpg

It appears to be a Segal lock though it's unclear what type.

-the center of the lock is about 2 and 3/4 inches from the side of the door
-the door is about 1 and 3/4 inches thick

-is there any way to know if purchasing the below would work with the above lock?
Prime-Line Products SE 70002 Brass Key Lock Cylinder - Screen Door Hardware - Amazon.com

-approximately what steps and tools would be involved in the installation of the new cylinder?

thanks,
dave
 
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  #2  
Old 04-05-15, 06:19 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

It might be less costly to just replace the lock but either way you'll need to remove the security plate from over the slot and tumbler.

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  #3  
Old 04-05-15, 08:09 PM
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hmm, how would one go about doing that approximately?
 
  #4  
Old 04-06-15, 12:52 AM
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In your first picture, of the inside turn knob, there are fours nuts that are well painted over that you will have to dig out of the paint to remove.

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  #5  
Old 04-06-15, 03:47 AM
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Depending on the age and size of the Condominium, some Condo Associations provide a lock swapping service for new Owners. They maintain an inventory of lock cylinders that gets rotated throughout the development so that no one knows where an old retired lock from one unit is redeployed in another unit.

The Maintenance Office probably needs to have a key to every unit as well.

I'd check with the Condo Association before making the change myself . . . . there may be an established procedure in place.
 
  #6  
Old 04-06-15, 05:15 AM
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Re: the condo association, I don't see any procedure or control of the sort in the bylaws/rules (nor are the boardmembers nice/approachable at all) and I have limited faith in the original owners from breaking in as they are/were of a criminal nature (further, it appears that every apartment has totally different doorknob/keys)

If I were to just dig out those nuts with a good vice grip/pliers/etc., then would just purchasing the below likely work pretty easily?

Prime-Line Products SE 70002 Brass Key Lock Cylinder - Screen Door Hardware - Amazon.com

then I could put the security plate back on?
 
  #7  
Old 04-06-15, 05:49 AM
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I guess you've convinced me !

That cylinder is pretty simple; once you get the security plate off, the dead-bolt mechanism will be easy to remove, and the cylinder is secured by just two screws under the dead-bolt.

Depending on the thickness of the door, you may have to trim the length of the screws (already notched for that purpose) and trim the tab that is turned by the key. Be careful not to trim them too much.

Then aligning everything may test your patience a little . . . . the first time; but you can do it.

I'm a Real Estate Broker, and often change the locks as a service for Buyers after Closing. I've just accumulated lock-sets and cylinders of most every kind that I can draw from, and after I've made a switch, I just place the removed lock and keys into my inventory for use the next time . . . . so it usually costs me nothing except time.

Depending upon how many people live in your unit, you may want to take the mechanism apart and take the old cylinder with you to match at the hardware store while someone else waits in the unit . . . . or just disassemble it and take a photo with you after reassembling it (for practice).

Good luck !
 

Last edited by Vermont; 04-06-15 at 06:32 AM.
  #8  
Old 04-08-15, 07:41 PM
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Yes, the photo shows a replacement "Rim" cylinder which will fit your lock as described by Vermont.

However, from looking at the keyhole photo, it looks like an old Medeco AIR keyway high security cylinder. Does your existing key say Medeco? If it's a generic duplicate it may have no name but will have a plain round bow (head),
and after removing the outside shield, the cylinder will say "MEDECO".

If so, while this design is long out of patent (duplication is no longer restricted) it remains a "high security" design, in that it is extremely difficult to pick, bump, or drill open, compared to the common replacement rim cylinders as shown in your pic. Most locksmiths who have been in business more than a few years can rekey this albeit at a higher price than rekeying a garden variety cylinder. Still, it'd be worth it.

While you're at it, check for loose/worn hinges, as your door is sagging considerably.

Incidentally, even tho you say other units have all kinds of different locks, at one time they were all the same, and since this Medeco design goes back to the late 60's, this could be original if your condo was built in the 70's/80's.
Unless previous owner(s) rekeyed the lock, it could still be on the old masterkey system. A locksmith can tell you this when he rekeys it.

All the more reason to re-key.
 
  #9  
Old 04-08-15, 08:14 PM
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I've since purchased a new segal cylinder at the local hardware store for $20 and just followed the video at

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XfJjyP-rt-k

but in reverse for the relevant sections

it seems to work fine though it does seem a bit loose so I might retighten the screws...

perhaps it's not the most secure lock in the world, but so long as I'm not the easiest target, I feel okay
 
  #10  
Old 04-10-15, 07:43 PM
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Keep your old medeco cylinder....might come in handy (re-keyed) in the future.
 
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