Screen door closer: loose/mounting holes


  #1  
Old 04-19-15, 09:21 AM
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Screen door closer: loose/mounting holes

the holes are actually too large for the size of screw that is currently there. The wind took the door and actually bent the flashing slightly.

My question is whats size/type of hardware should i use? currently the person had installed wood screws but they aren't grabbing.

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Last edited by PJmax; 04-19-15 at 01:23 PM. Reason: reoriented picture
  #2  
Old 04-19-15, 12:57 PM
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What i do with oversize holes is get some wooden matches and wood glue, get a little glue on match and put it in hole, Fill hole completely I usually tap the last match in so they are tight. Give glue overnight to dry and you have a good hole to screw in. I assume that it's wood frame.
 
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Old 04-19-15, 01:07 PM
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Pull a screw out and see how long it is.
Going to need at least a 2" to hit the framing not just the door jamb.
2-1/2 or 3" would be even better.
 
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Old 04-19-15, 05:32 PM
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Any storm door that is allowed to be snatched by the wind will likely damage the opener or it's mounting bracket. So, that is the key problem. Storm doors are lightly constructed and easily grabbed by the wind. Making sure you hold onto the door when opening it on windy days and making sure it's securely latched closed will address the root problem.

This sounds like a repeat problem. Those are not the stock screws provided with a door closer. I suspect the same thing happened when the closer was attached with the provided hardware. The door was allowed to snatch open which ripped out the original hardware so longer screws that reach back into the framing were installed. The door was caught by the wind again and ripped those screws free. Do you see a pattern? Storm doors are easily caught by the wind flinging them open and damaging something.

If you remove the existing screws and they are 2-3" long then I think the next option is to go to larger diameter screws. Or, re-locate the closer to a different position so it can be mounted into fresh, undamaged wood.

If this door is in an exposed location consider installing two closers and a chain with a spring shock absorber. Still, if the door is allowed to swing free on a windy day it is likely to be damaged. Your operation of the door can prevent the damage from occurring. If you don't latch the door closed or open it without holding onto it on a windy day then something may break.
 
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Old 04-19-15, 06:10 PM
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A simple safety spring will prevent it from happening again.
Might cost a whole $10.00 and take 5 min. to install.
Any hardware store of box store will have one.
 
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Old 04-19-15, 07:29 PM
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i will get larger diameter screws and try to shorten the chain on the safety spring
 
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Old 04-23-15, 12:41 PM
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You could look for a product online called Plast-Aid. It is a forming agent that repairs the stripped holes. It turns the wood into hardened plastic that can then be re-drilled. Much tougher than the wood.
 
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Old 04-23-15, 04:45 PM
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Your photo shows what we might more appropriately call a Storm Door. A Screen Door is like the lightweight screen in wood frame (no glass) with a long coil spring that makes the door go "BLAP---plap-plap". Like my grandmother had.

The aforementioned longer screws capable of penetrating the first wall stud are appropriate. But a storm door (aluminum with glass) really needs 2 of this type closer, 1 at top and 1 at bottom. Adjust individually with the other disconnected on a windless day. Connect both, then fine-tune equally.
 
 

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