Re-keying a dead bolt lock

Reply

  #1  
Old 09-08-15, 05:28 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 428
Re-keying a dead bolt lock

Is it possible to alter a deadbolt to take a different type of key than it originally had?

Longer version;
I live in an old house that was converted into a duplex. In order to cut down on the number of keys I need (and to make it easier for me as a landlord), I rekeyed all the locks in my part of the house to use their own key or a master key.

All of the locks in the house are Kwikset. One of the door locks is this style
[ATTACH=CONFIG]55796[/ATTACH]
That one is not a Kwikset, but the Kwikset keys fit that lock (not so much the other way). Since I cannot rekey that lock (to my knowledge), that is the key I use as the master key and rekeyed all the quickset locks.

I have been unable to find a Kwikset version of that lock in order to do a simple replacement. That particular door does not appear thick enough to take the more usual kind of deadbolt.

I would like to replace or otherwise alter that lock so that it can actually be used and rekeyed with a Kwikset. Is there another brand that uses the sime types of pins so I can just rekey it? If not, is there another brand that would allow for an entire Kwikset cylinder to be installed?

Thanks.
 
Attached Images  
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 09-08-15, 05:40 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,549
I don't know about rekeying that lock but the back door on my shop is too thin for most deadbolts and locksets so I scabbed a piece of 1/4" plywood over the lock area to make the door thickness right so it could accept the locks.
 
  #3  
Old 09-08-15, 07:10 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 428
That is certainly a valid solution for most situations. However, the specific layout of this door forbids that solution be placed on the interior of the door. I do not feel that placing the extra wood on the exterior of the door would be secure, since that can be more easily chipped away and then the lock removed.

Thanks for the thought, though.
 
  #4  
Old 09-08-15, 07:26 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,549
I placed the plywood on the inside of my door and notched out the door stop [door swings out] but there wasn't any weatherstripping to be concerned with. I also installed brass plates that slip over the edge of the door held in place by the lockset.
 
  #5  
Old 09-09-15, 04:41 PM
GlobalLocky's Avatar
Member
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 925
I have cylinders in the kwikset keyway. Most locksmiths do. Or you could try an Ilco cylinder.
 
  #6  
Old 09-09-15, 08:28 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 1,168
You have said that your Kwikset key fits the pictured lock, and that you would like to rekey it to fit a different Kwikset key, correct? Virtually all Rim cylinders, (what the picture shows) are rekeyable, by removing a C clip or circlip, or in some cases, a roll pin. Most Rim cylinders use standard replacement pin tumblers common to most locks, including Kwikset. (Except their Smartkey series, which still use standard Kwikset keys) Depending on the brand of Rim cylinder you have, the spacing of the pin chambers may be a bit different from that of the Kwikset (ILCO comes to mind) but the wide flat valleys of a standard Kwikset key will accomodate this spacing difference when standard replacement pin tumblers are used, which are pointy on the bottom.

Or, as Global has suggested, you can purchase a replacement Rim cylinder in a generic Kwikset/Ilco/Dexter keyway, from your local smithy. They're not expensive.
 
  #7  
Old 09-11-15, 11:35 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 428
Clarification of issues;
1) Kwikset does not make (that I could find) a cylinder with a blade at the back as is pictured above.
2) Kwikset does not make a full lock set as pictured above.
3) Other companies make the above or at least make the cylinder, BUT; that cylinder is not the same dimension as a Kwikset cylinder.

Solution that managed to work for me.
1) Purchase a generic lock with Kwikset style key (Big Orange had only one style that allowed for access to the tumbler springs. It's the wrong color, but the correct color did not allow access and I wound up ruining it by having the pins not work and then being unable to remove the cylinder.)
2) Rekey with a Kwitset kit.
NOTE: This requires throwing away the keys that came with the lock. The generic lock may fit a Kwikset key, but the pins are not the same height (a #1 pin is shorter than a Kwikset #1 pin). Because the cylinder is of a smaller diameter, I had to use longer pins than I normally would in three of the holes. The old Kwikset key and the master key both work, but they are not as smooth as if they were in a Kwikset lock. This was a much more analog process of testing different pin lengths one at a time for each key than the typical digital process of just measuring the key teeth and dropping in that pin (or pin and master spacer). As stated, three pins had to be different than what was measured.

SHAME on Kwikset for inexplicably not making this kind of lock.
 
  #8  
Old 09-14-15, 03:00 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 1,168
1) Correct. Kwikset does not make a Rim cylinder (a blade at the back, as in the
picture). However, (and I should have pointed this out, sorry) there's several
aftermarket companies that make these Rim cylinders in various keyways,
including Kwikset. You will probably not find them at Big Orange or Big Blue,
but your local smithy can get you one.

2) Correct again, but you can buy the whole lock from the above-mentioned
aftermarket companies, although the rim cylinder included will probably not
be a Kwikset.

3) Rekeying the cylinder is more efficiently done by your local smithy. A Kwikset
pinning kit is only designed for Kwikset locks. Your local smithy uses a
large generic pinning kit that will accomodate virtually all brands of pin-
tumbler lock cylinders, because he can select pin lengths to within .003"
and thereby match most manufacturers pin length specs.
 
  #9  
Old 09-14-15, 05:45 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 1,168
Oh, and a comment to address your last statement: Kwikset does not make the Rim style lock because by the time the company was formed after WWII, this style of lock was quickly loosing favor to the "cylindrical" or "bored-in" lockset (what you see on 99% of residential doors today, ie., "modern" locks). There was never a financial incentive to tool up for this type lock, because they knew they wouldn't sell enough to justify the expense.

I'm not surprised you're from the New England area of the country, as these type locks are still found frequently in those parts. As comparison, here in Texas, having done residential locksmithing from 1976 to 1995, I can count on one hand the number of times I've had to install OR service a Rim type lock in a residential setting.
 
  #10  
Old 09-14-15, 06:51 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 1,168
While I'm in a talkative mood tonight, (forgive me, Global) I might explain to the lay reader what we mean when we describe a "Keyway". A keyway is not a thing. It is not a lock, a cylinder, a key. It is a shape. It represents the cross-sectional shape of a locks' keyhole, and therefore the shape of the key in which it will enter. Keys from one manufacturer can't usually be inserted into locks of another manufacturer unless the keyways are so similar as to be considered the same, as in the case of Kwikset, Dexter and Ilco. If a key and/or lock is well worn, it may be able to be inserted (and therefore, be pinned to operate) a few other manufacturers' locks. Keyways are patentable. A new unique keyway means that none of the zillions of existing keys out there (the world?) will even enter the lock, let alone operate it.

And while the main, name brand lock manufacturers only produce locks with their own keyways, (some companies have dozens of keyways , for commercial use), the aftermarket companies, and many imported lock companies offer their locks in many popular keyways whose original keyway patents, (if there ever were any) have long since expired.

The rule of thumb generally, then is that if any given key can be inserted into any given lock cylinder, pin tumblers can be selected to fit that key. (with a few exceptions residentially, and a few more commercially).

Sometimes we "smithys" use terminology with daily familiarity to us, not realizing Joe Blow on the Street is left "bumfuzzled". (an old Southern term).
 
  #11  
Old 09-15-15, 12:51 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 428
I'm not surprised you're from the New England area of the country
I'm in the Buffalo area. New England can suck it.*

Thanks for the verbose explanations. Still a shame that Kwikset refuses to re-purpose their machines to at least make the Rim cylinder. But it is their decision.

*This statement is only topical until after the second week of 2015's football season.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'