Keyless Lock for Sliding Patio Door.... Padiolok?

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  #1  
Old 10-16-15, 12:17 PM
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Keyless Lock for Sliding Patio Door.... Padiolok?

I am looking for a keyless (probably keypad) lock for my sliding back door. Its a vinyl door with one of those hook locks in the edge of the door. I think that's called a mortise.

Anyway, I am trying to find a keyless two way add on lock that will work with this sliding glass door.

Searching the web I found a lock called Padiolok but they are not quite available yet. Seems to be new. Seem it will be available soon. Says it will work with vinyl doors. And aluminum too. Does anyone know anything about it or any other keyless options so i can lock when I leave or unlock when I return. For my vinyl sliding door?

Gracias
 
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  #2  
Old 10-16-15, 02:34 PM
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Are you looking for a lock that uses a keypad or a key card to open the door? I don't know what other options exist. I've seen fingerprint locks.
 
  #3  
Old 10-16-15, 06:41 PM
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I don't know of anything self-contained for this type of door, all I'd know to do is piece together several discrete components to make a system.

There are a number of inexpensive keypads for example, that would require a low voltage source, and be surface or flush mounted on the adjacent wall, but it would have to control an electric lock of some sort. A so-called "Micro-Mag" could be fitted to the door with custom brackets, but they only hold 300 lbs or so.
Larger magnets are unattractive.

Sliding patio doors have been historically insecure, and usually require supplemental locks such as "Charlie-Bars" or locking pins etc., accessible from the inside only. I've seen some poorly-designed apartment complexes in which a sliding glass door was the primary entrance, forcing the renters to use the cheap key lock for security.

It is high-time for someone to invent a battery-operated keypad lock with concealed vertical rods for security.
 
  #4  
Old 10-17-15, 06:48 AM
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Looking forward

The PaDIOLOCK is interesting, but will it ever come on the market? Is it a solution in search of a need? Is there a market at their price? Time will answer some if not all such questions.

Years ago I considered trying to make a vertical rod lock for sliding patio doors and I did find one on-line, but it isn't in the manufacturer's current catalog. It would have been interesting to observe an installation over a year or two.

For most of the last 15 years of my career, on average, I serviced 1 or more electrified vertical rod exit devices each week. When you mix steel and moisture inside an aluminum tube, you will have corrosion and the corrosion causes stiff operation. Much of my service on these devices was cleaning, lubrication and adjusting.

The inrush current on these devices was universally over 15 Amps @24VDC. While I think the in-line mechanical force required could be less than the commercial devices I serviced, inrush would still be substantial and we haven't included the holding time required for the door to be opened. I doubt today's technology can provide a suitable but reasonably priced battery. Maybe someday!
 

Last edited by ThisOldMan; 10-17-15 at 06:59 AM. Reason: corrected 2nd paragraph info.
  #5  
Old 10-17-15, 09:01 PM
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What I was envisioning would be similar to the very low current electrified levers (trim) used on commercial exit devices, which in a residential setting would require even less current, especially when used with a clutched knob or lever.
The Padiolok does look promising, as long as the logic board with relays etc. are located inside the door with only data wires going to the keypad, so that knocking the keypad off the door then crossing random wires would not result in unlocking the door. The actuating linkage from the keypad would have to be clutched or with a break-away feature to prevent forcing, as well. So we'll see.

Incidentally, you'll be happy to know the industry is quickly changing from the high current latch-retraction solenoids to the new stepper-motors. Seems like every brand that once had solenoids are now offering motors. It's a "step" in the right direction.
 
  #6  
Old 10-18-15, 06:14 AM
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Excellent points rstripe! For battery powered units it's much more logical to unlock the rods rather than retract them. (My reasoning came from having plenty of power available from line powered remote power supplys) A solenoid activates a clutch allowing the user to retract the rods. With a mechanical detent on the clutch to keep it activated after power is removed from the solenoid and until the rods are retracted, power requirements could be lowered even further.

As for stepper motors, I submit that generating a magnetic field to do a X amount of work requires the same amount of power whether generated in a stepper motor or solenoid. Stepper motors also have multiple coils and I have to wonder if more than 1 might be powered at the same time. The cost of a stepper motor and its controller would have to be weighed against the cost of a solenoid. Then both weighed against possible cost savings from reduced battery cost.

As usual, I have few answers, but many questions.
 
  #7  
Old 10-19-15, 12:35 PM
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I would prefer a key over keycard. That just seems too bulky.
 
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Old 10-21-15, 08:09 PM
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@ AntHoney: your original post indicated you wanted "Keyless" such as a "keypad"......are you now saying you want a key-operated lock?

@ThisOldMan: Not so, my friend....the stepper motors require less than 1 Amp @ 24VDC as opposed to the 15 Amps or so to get a solenoid moving. Holding power for the solenoids, once seated, is very low, on the order of a half amp. But because a solenoid's "pull" decreases exponentially the farther the plunger travels from it's seated position, it needs that initial surge to get things moving.

The power required with a motor would be in proportion to the time it takes to fully unlock the device, and depends on the design RPM of the motor, and to a lesser extent, the pitch of the screw-drive; the courser the pitch, the quicker the device would unlock, but the more power it would require. If the pitch is too fine, the device won't re-lock. We seem to have reached a compromise where the maximum acceptable time to unlock (about 3/4 second) results in around 5 revolutions of the motor, and requiring less than an amp. These units are being sold at a slightly higher price than the solenoid-operated devices, and I don't know if that's because it's what the market will bear, or they're really more expensive to make. Theoretically, they should last longer, as they don't shock the linkages as much. Time will tell.
 
  #9  
Old 10-23-15, 02:43 PM
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Key-less like PaDIOLOK is preferred

Hi... you are correct I would prefer keyless. So that if we are coming in that way unexpected or have been out for a run or whatever we don't have to have a key at all. PaDIOLOK says it is like that. That is ideally what we want. Sometimes one of us goes out leaving the other at home but the first might not take a key as they don't have to lock up after themselves. Then when the second person leaves they don't know if the first has a key and if they will be locking them out. The key pad type of solution would solve all of that.

My comment that I'd prefer a key over a keycard I guess wasn't very complete. I meant that if I have to have a physical thing I'd just go with a key rather than a keycard. I think there are some key options out there but I am also told those locks are pretty easy to pick open.
 
  #10  
Old 10-24-15, 10:30 PM
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You might want to take a look at the Lockey C150 digital hookbolt....not much to go on at their website, but the company's been around awhile, and the mechanical keypad is reasonably difficult to manipulate. A lot cheaper than going to electrical components. You may need to do some "Southern Engineering" to adapt it to your purpose, tho. And there are some inexpensive modifications you can do to a sliding glass door to make them more difficult to lift off their tracks.

I'd install this as an auxiliary lock tho, strictly to use while you're out for a short time during the day; Use additional means to lock the door at night.

And remember that code locks are considered to be less secure than key or card locks by virtue of the fact that a code is not a physical credential; once the code is given to another person, it can't be taken back. You'd have to change the code, which you should do every so often anyway,(like an online bank password.) The other risk is a nearby person observing you punch in the code. Always stand right in front of the keypad and use your other hand to shield your code entry. Also, pretend to punch in 1 or 2 digits before and after entering the true code, so even if someone saw and remembered the sequence, it would not work.
 
  #11  
Old 11-06-15, 10:01 AM
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I agree. the Lockey products might be a simple solution that could be modified to work with the existing hook bolt.

Short of that, depending on how deep your pockets are....consider a mag lock with an external pin pad and internal release/emergency button.

like this one for a cabinet...Securitron : Cabinet Locks : M32-SS
 
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