Cannot remove Mul-T-Lock deadbolt back plate

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  #1  
Old 12-05-15, 02:58 PM
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Cannot remove Mul-T-Lock deadbolt back plate

Hi,

I inherited this Mul-T-Lock deadbolt in this house I bought a few years ago. Now I want to try smart lock and take the back plate off. In most other deadbolts unscrewing the two screws would be it. But this one after taking the screws off, the front and back are still attached. Tried looking for installation/removal manual on the Internet and no luck.

Looked at the thumbturn but there is no allen key or other slot that I can see to take it off. There is another plate inside but I can't see anything that connects it to the back plate or the front cylinder.
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Looking at the front, the outer rings can be turned but can't find a way to separate it to look further.
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When peering inside, there is a little slot in the inside of the front part. Tried jabbing it a bit but doesn't seem to do anything.
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I need to take the back part off and the put the smart lock plate on. Any help is greatly appreciated.

Thanks.

Terence
 
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  #2  
Old 12-05-15, 03:36 PM
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Looking at the turn knob, what appear to be screws with no slots are probably "plugs" driven into Allen-head bolts. You need to use a small screwdriver (probably not the jeweler's screwdriver) to pry out the plugs and then use the proper Allen wrench to remove the bolts.
 
  #3  
Old 12-05-15, 11:23 PM
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Hi Furd. Thanks for the quick reply. I might have confused you showing the back of the bolt with the screws already out. There are screws slots to tighten with the front of the lock. However, after removing the screws the back plates are still attached to the front. I tried prying the turn knob with a bit of force but nothing gives.
 
  #4  
Old 12-06-15, 04:01 AM
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In that case I can't help you. Maybe one of the locksmiths (we have two) can offer some assistance. It may be a few days before they respond so don't give up.
 
  #5  
Old 12-06-15, 07:12 AM
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A bit of a WAG, but it needs to be done before moving to the next part: Check the shaft of the thumb-turn "wings" for a retaining screw (flat or hex). I had thumb-turns that were difficult to remove from the tailpiece. May have been corrosion between a steel tailpiece and diecast thumb-turn.

Rotate the wings of the thumb-turn horizontal, place your knuckles below the thumb-turn (fulcrum point for leverage), place the blade of flat-bladed screwdrivers on each side of the thumb-turn shaft and apply judicious force. Worked for me more than once.
 
  #6  
Old 12-06-15, 09:59 AM
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Not being familiar with Multi-Lock deadbolts, I can only give it a shot in the dark:

You have obviously removed the screws so something's in a bind. Note the arrow on the thumb-turn in one photo is pointing down, and it should be pointing either up (at the locked symbol) or to the left or right. Now it could simply have been installed wrong, if that tailpiece design allows it, but some tailpiece designs will only allow the thumb-turn to be installed in the correct way such that the pointer points correctly at the locked symbol when the bolt is thrown. If that is the case here, then the misalignment would indicate that the tailpiece has been twisted from too much force on the thumb-turn, and this can jam the tailpiece in the thumb-turn and make them hard to separate. You've loosened the assembly enough to peek inside the cavity and you might be able to see if the tailpiece (connecting bar between the thumb-turn and key cylinder) and determine if it is twisted. If so, try twisting it back straight.

As ThisOldMan stated, a fair amount of force may be necessary to remove it. Pry evenly.
 
  #7  
Old 12-06-15, 11:08 PM
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Hi rstripe, I'm also puzzled by the way the arrow pointed and also thought there might be some bad installation there. I just realized that perhaps only the cylinder is Mul-T-Lock, the housing is Weiser as I can see the Weiser logo on deadbolt (the part that meet the strike plate). I'll do more research for my next weekend project. Thanks.
 
  #8  
Old 12-07-15, 10:27 PM
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I thought something looked familiar; the design of the t-turn, bolt and (by careful observation thru the left t-turn screw hole) tailpiece, are pure Kwikset brand. The Weiser logo on the bolt-plate is because during the time of this lock's manufacture both companies were owned by Black & Decker. (May still be, I don't know. Can't keep up with the constant mergers and acquisitions in the industry).

Kwikset used a uniquely-shaped tailpiece unlike the flat bar design most other deadbolt companies use: It's a stamped metal tube shaped like a fat letter "D". As such, it will only insert one way into the t-turn. This tube is pretty stout. It won't twist easily. The misaligned arrow therefore would suggest that, if the connection between tailpiece and t-turn is worn out, and the user applied too much force, the connection could "strip", leaving the arrow in a new position.

You might try squirting a little penetrating oil (WD-40 or similar) (via the little squirt tube that comes with the aerosol can) if you can reach the point where the tailpiece goes into the t-turn, and try forcing it back where it belongs.
 
  #9  
Old 12-07-15, 10:47 PM
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Today, Multi-Lock makes a variety of high-security complete locksets, but back in the day (I think they started around 1970 in Israel) they may have started marketing to the USA by providing the cylinder component to retrofit into a Kwikset deadbolt, as well as possibly other brands.

As an aside, the Weiser logo on what looks to be a Kwikset lock gives me a chuckle; when they were separate companies, the most popular line of Weiser deadbolts was, in the opinion of many locksmiths, the better lock, if only by a small margin, than the most popular line of Kwikset's. So when the two brands merged, it would seem that they decided to keep the Kwikset design, as it was probably a tad cheaper to manufacture, but apply the Weiser name because it had a slightly better reputation. Who knows...
 
  #10  
Old 12-13-15, 11:36 PM
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Thank rstripe for the tips. It is indeed a bad installation. I applied force evenly and got the thumb turn plate out. The thing was just jammed sideway. Now I'm trying this Okidokeys smart lock. Not particularly impressed but at least it kinds of work.
 
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