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Electric strike for mortise with deadbolt


josephny's Avatar
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03-05-17, 06:29 AM   #1 (permalink)  
Electric strike for mortise with deadbolt

I would like to install an electric strike on a steel entrance door that has a mortise with deadbolt.

I've found several that can do this, but none that will let the door swing shut and relatch with the deadbolt in the extended position.

Is there a strike that will open and allow the door to swing shut back into the locked position while the deadbolt remains extended?

Thank you!

Joseph

 
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rstripe's Avatar
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03-05-17, 12:25 PM   #2 (permalink)  
Yes there is. The HES 1006 CAS strike stays open until the door shuts, then re-captures the extended deadbolt and locks closed. Designed primarily for commercial hollow-metal frames, I've installed them in wood, as well.

Bear in mind, they're a little persnickety to install and fit properly, and a little tweaking may be necessary for smooth operation. Adjust your door closer for smooth closing without slamming.

They also have a model to allow release of a locked latch but not the deadbolt, for "nightlatch" security.

They're a little pricey, but they're for Grade 1 commercial security.

 
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03-08-17, 04:19 PM   #3 (permalink)  
I am not on the payroll of this company. I have no affiliation with them.
Try this product....

4100DBDL deadbolt split latch electric strike, fire rated heavy duty strike for mortise locks with deadbolts..

 
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03-11-17, 04:34 AM   #4 (permalink)  
Thank you!

That's great.

After reading up on it, I ordered the 1006CS to go with the Comelit 8531.

I'm both excited and nervous about this -- it's my first time.

Luckily, there are lots of templates and detailed dimension drawings available.

Thank you both so much!

Any tips of the best tool to cut the inside face of steel door jam to fit the 1006?

 
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03-14-17, 05:51 PM   #5 (permalink)  
I use a Makita 3/8" hand held belt sander with different coarse belts. Makes accuracy very straightforward. Expect to pay about $285 online. I doubt you'll pick one up from a store.
I use my tool so often, it's the best power tool I have ever purchased.

 
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03-15-17, 05:49 AM   #6 (permalink)  
Belt Sander?

Wow, what a great idea to use a belt sander.

Can you please elaborate on how to make a clean cut into a steel door frame with it?

Specifically, I'm trying to turn A into B below.


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03-15-17, 03:18 PM   #7 (permalink)  
The 3/8" Makita belt sander using heavier coarse belts will allow you to accurately cut the steel to desired size. Although in your picture, which is difficult to understand, I think you will have to cut out the portion of the wall to accomodate the strike face. probably why you may be better off with an electric mortise lock rather than an electric strike.

 
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03-15-17, 03:23 PM   #8 (permalink)  
Oh no! Already bought the electric strike.

I believe that I need to cut out a section of steel from the face of the frame, approximate 1-11/16" wide by 3-3/8" high.

Would the belt sander be best for that, or a dremel with a cutting wheel?

Thanks!

 
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03-16-17, 01:54 PM   #9 (permalink)  
A dremel will work, but I personally have more accuracy using the belt sander. Work slowly and constantly measure for accuracy. (dont just do it in one cut)
Many installers like to use a jigsaw too. You could start with the dremel or jigsaw and then clean up the accuracy with the belt sander for a more professional look.
It varies by the tech as to which method they prefer.

 
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03-18-17, 06:11 AM   #10 (permalink)  
Trying both

I ordered the 3/8" Makita and will try both.

Very excited about doing this.

Thank you all for your help!

 
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03-20-17, 02:26 PM   #11 (permalink)  
Everything was moving along so nicely:

Cut the steel (took my time, which was the best advice!), fit the strike in and it all looked good.

Then I tried closing the door and I realized that the strike extends beyond the door jamb and blocks the door from closing.

And, the nice shiny strike plate that I assume is supposed to go over the strike and get screwed to the frame together with the strike sticks out proud from the jamb.

Here's some pics. Can someone please help!

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Last edited by PJmax; 03-20-17 at 03:13 PM. Reason: reoriented/resized pictures
 
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03-20-17, 03:14 PM   #12 (permalink)  
We need to see picture 2 with the door open and nothing in the way.


~ Pete ~

 
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03-21-17, 02:09 PM   #13 (permalink)  
Progress

I was able to bend the tabs in somewhat so that the strike and the faceplate now sit flush with the jamb.

But the keep still sits proud of the jamb, which it looks like it was designed to do.

But, the door hits it and will not close.

Here's pics:

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03-29-17, 10:11 PM   #14 (permalink)  
Been offline for several days, so I'm late to the party. Your photos show a standard commercial type hollow-metal frame with welded mortar box. I've put in hundreds of 1006's into these frames. This advise is somewhat after-the-fact but for what it's worth:

1. The assumption is you have the standard 1/8" gap between door and frame. Your photo shows virtually no clearance. You are correct to bend the remaining tabs in a little, but too much and you risk breaking them. Once the tabs are bent in a little, you then need to cut about 1/8" off both strike ears then file an angle on them so that the strike will sit further into the frame. Be sure to cut the face of frame back further as well. Check your hinges for tightness. They can sometimes be shimmed so that when closed, the door will sit closer to the hinge side, thereby increasing the gap at the latch side. Locksmiths use a tool to "pinch" the knuckles together and accomplish the same thing.

2. I use a good quality orbital jig saw and trim up with a flat file. Takes about 1/2 hour.

 
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03-31-17, 10:50 AM   #15 (permalink)  
rstripe is spot on. I originally presumed your door has the standard 1/8" gap all around. That is considered plumb on any door worldwide AFAIK.

That you have no gap on a steel frame door, is a very bad idea I think.
You should check the hinges in deeper or file/plane the back edge of the door (hinge side), otherwise I foresee issues down the road.

 
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04-02-17, 11:54 AM   #16 (permalink)  
Actually the strike is NOT designed to stay "proud" of the frame; it should be flush with the frame such that, even if your door has no clearance and rubs the frame slightly, it should not rub the strike. Your second set of photos are a little out of focus, but I suspect the remaining tabs to which you're screwing the strike to, are slightly twisted so that altho the faceplate portion of the strike is flush, the rounded outer portion is still proud. I usually have to give the tabs a bit of a twist to allow the strike to sit in the cavity at a slight angle to insure the rounded portion is at or below flush.

This situation is sometimes caused by the door edge being square, rather than beveled. Usually hollow metal doors are beveled to allow the leading edge (as the door is closing) to have the necessary clearance, due to the fact that the hinge pins (esp. on 4.5 X 4.5" hinges) place the doors' pivot point almost 1.5" beyond the doors' centerline. Still, cut the ears and file/grind an angle so the entire strike can sit at less than flush, and you'll be "in high cotton"

Your bigger issue may be tweaking the deadbolt "catch" (for lack of a better term) to properly re-lock the strike as the door closes. Occasionally the bolt needs to be filed/ground with a bevel edge to get smooth operation.

 
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