Sliding surface bolt

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  #1  
Old 03-09-17, 07:04 AM
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Sliding surface bolt

Is there a surface sliding bolt that is meant to be installed at the top of the door? My daughter has an old transom front door, and the trim sits flush with the door only at the top. There is already a deadbolt on the door, so this second bolt would only be for added security.
 
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Old 03-09-17, 09:10 AM
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The only type of surface bolt I'm familiar with is a barrel bolt. A flush bolt would look better but would require a mortise.
 
  #3  
Old 03-09-17, 09:20 AM
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Is this what you are thinking about?

surface bolt

- Peter
 
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Old 03-10-17, 04:03 AM
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surface bolt

yes, that was exactly what I was thinking of but in brass. Is there any reason this type of bolt could not be installed at the top of the door and push up?
 
  #5  
Old 03-10-17, 06:06 AM
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The only thing you need to watch for is that the bolt either has enough friction or has an internal spring so that it won't simply slide down due to it's own weight with a little vibration.

Here's one in brass that claims it will stay in proper position:

12" Traditional Style Surface Door Bolt In Solid Brass | House of Antique Hardware
 
  #6  
Old 03-12-17, 02:50 PM
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I don't know the integrity of your door, but the average residential wood door would not benefit much with a bolt at the top. Prying and kick-in forces are usually at mid-height where the deadbolt/doorknobs are located...Due to the flexibility of most doors, a top bolt won't make the doorknob/deadbolt any stronger, and once these are broken, a top bolt won't resist entry much, due to twisting.

However, if all you're trying to do is prevent easy entry from someone with a key or a possible lockpicking attempt, it will accomplish that.

If you want to make it harder to kick in tho, you need to make improvements at the doorknob/deadbolt area.
 
  #7  
Old 03-14-17, 05:05 PM
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Post #3 shows a panic skeleton bolt. Polished brass is often a special order. Expect to pay about $75 for something like that. Special order can get you up to 48" in length
 
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