Corbin door knob removal help

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  #1  
Old 04-11-17, 10:48 AM
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Corbin door knob removal help

My Corbin door knob/handle is starting to stick and I want to remove and clean the lock. I have started disassembly and am stumped as to how to remove the threaded arm that held the door knob.

I tried separating the two halves and pulling it out, but neither side seems to budge.

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Last edited by PJmax; 04-11-17 at 05:34 PM. Reason: reoriented pictures
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  #2  
Old 04-12-17, 08:28 AM
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Good news, I was able to get the sectional spindle off and the mortise lock out of the door. I opened it up to find a broken spring was the source of all my issues with the buttons not working and the door handle sticking. It was lodged into the bottom of the lock area.

I now have 2 additional questions.
  1. I need to find a replacement spring to keep the deadbolt from being able to be pushed right back in. Would anyone know of a resource?
  2. Now that it is back together and in the door, I am having problems with using the key to pull the latch in when turning the key as far as it will go. Is there a chance I did not put something back correctly or something needs to be lubed?

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  #3  
Old 04-12-17, 08:42 PM
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Once again, my lengthy answer got me kicked off and I lost the text. Can one of the mods tell me how to stay "signed in" so I don't get kicked off and loose my answers? I used to be able to check the "remember me" box, as one of you recently advised, but lately a new sign-in page is being used and there is no "remember me" box to check anymore, that I can see...I know there's another method, but I don't remember it.

Thanks.
 
  #4  
Old 04-13-17, 08:18 PM
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Question #1: If you live in a large metro area, check a full-line hardware store, as many of them have a small selection of flat spring stock. Then of course, there's the internet; Your biggest problem may not be finding a suitable replacement, but rather getting the broken piece out and securing the new spring in place; in the process of removing or peening the new one in place, some of those old bronze castings were somewhat brittle and severe pounding with hammer can break them.

Lubrication: lack thereof would not explain a malfunction. But all parts subject to wear against other parts should be coated with a little grease, the exception being the key cylinder, which should get a few shots of graphite into the keyhole. Never use petroleum oils or grease in the key cylinder.
 
  #5  
Old 04-13-17, 09:12 PM
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Question #2: It does appear that the cylinder-to-latch linkage arm may not be positioned correctly; I can't tell why, as much of the arm is hidden behind the deadbolt. The lower portion looks correct, as it impinges on the latch, but the upper portion looks too far away from the cylinder hole.

Usually this arm is fastened to, and pivots on the deadbolt. When the deadbolt is projected (locked) the tab at the top end of the arm is "out of the way" of the cylinder cam, so that when the key rotates the cam to retract the deadbolt, it will pass by the tab, then continue around to push the deadlocker arm (the one with the broken spring) down, then retract the deadbolt, then release the deadlocker arm. Further rotation will bring the key back around to the key removal position.
 
  #6  
Old 04-13-17, 09:20 PM
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Question #2 (cont.) As the deadbolt is being retracted by the key, the latch linkage arm travels with it, and because the lower portion of the arm stays in the same position, the upper portion (with the tab) swings closer to the cylinder hole.

Now, when the key is inserted and turned in the same direction as before, it's cam will come into contact with the tab and cause the lower end to pivot, and retract the latch.

It's possible this linkage arm is actually 2 arms, interacting behind the deadbolt (where I can't see) but it's not the more common method.

Tho again, not likely, it's possible the broken spring may have a dual role in positioning the tab correctly.
 
  #7  
Old 04-13-17, 09:34 PM
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By now, you may have solved your problem, but if not, I'd be curious to see the back side of the deadbolt to reveal the entire cylinder-to-latch linkage arm.

Additionally, about the broken spring: selections of coil springs are more readily available than flat springs and you may be able to do some "southern engineering" as we call it in these parts, to bias the deadlocker arm and restore it's function.

As a further curiosity, I see you've discovered how to remove the "split spindle" after removing the inner knob. Again, in the usual arrangement, one of the spindle halves has a hook on the end that that can only be removed after the other half without the hook, is removed first. The hook goes behind the outer hub so as to anchor the knob when pulling the door open. These split spindles and the set screw that secures the knob in place, were by far the most troublesome components on these old mortise locks.
 
  #8  
Old 05-20-17, 01:50 PM
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Well, I have finally fixed the lock. I was not able to find a flat spring replacement, but a local jeweler was willing to solder the two pieces back together with a little bit of gold and it seems to be working great. I'll be happy to upload some pics of the spring back in place, but as for now it is all working fantastic and I am so glad I did not have to replace everything with a modern lock and handle.
 
  #9  
Old 05-20-17, 07:20 PM
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Thanks kindly for getting back.....I hadn't thought of the jeweler possibility.
 
  #10  
Old 05-31-17, 05:18 PM
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all hobby lobby or similar stores sell spring steel stock
 
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