Power wire for new front door lock

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  #1  
Old 04-27-17, 06:20 AM
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Power wire for new front door lock

I am installing a new front door. I would like to install a lock that can be open from buzzer on the second floor. Stairs are getting hard to do,have camera. How would I go about getting a power cable (probably 18ga,2 or 4 wire) down to where the lock would be. Also maybe a wire for a bell.
 
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  #2  
Old 04-27-17, 07:09 AM
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how about a smart lock

Have you considered the type of lock that you can open remotely with your smartphone? might be easier than hardwiring it. I am no expert in locks but a quick search brought up one from kwikset called Kevo.

- Peter
 
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Old 04-27-17, 07:13 AM
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Post moved to Lock Forum.
 
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Old 04-27-17, 07:58 AM
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Is there a way of getting the wire to the lock on the door jam. The door has a sidelight. So you can not come in from the side of the jam. Do not want to install some thing with a battery.
 
  #5  
Old 04-27-17, 08:08 AM
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how about a magnetic lock that would be installed at the top of the door rather than running wires to the latch?

http://www.beainc.com/wp-content/the...2020161103.pdf

- Peter
 
  #6  
Old 04-27-17, 08:51 AM
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Depending on your door's construction the molding that frames up the jamb could be removed to run wires. It could be a difficult job getting it apart without destroying the pieces but a good carpenter should be able to do it. If needed a slot could also be cut to run wires. Then of course the next question comes to cost as this would be an "annoying" job so I would not do it cheap. I assume any wiring would be low voltage DC so you wouldn't have code concerns as you would with 120 VAC.
 
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Old 04-27-17, 11:11 AM
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Based on installing hundreds and servicing thousands more, I would not recommend a mag-lock for a residence. It could still be subject to the Special Locking Arrangements requirements of NFPA 101 The Life Safety Code.

Normally I would recommend an electric strike, but the sidelight issue presents major problems. There has to be room in the door frame to accept a device along with the wire loop connected to it, and that room probably isn't there. Even a "standard" electrified lock requires some type of power transfer from the door to the frame.

Even though they are battery-powered, the type lock suggested in Post #2 may be your best bet, but with a caveat. I don't think you want a device that unlocks in the normal sense of the word; you would have to remember to lock it again (another phone operation, if that function is available). I suspect you want the device to unlock for a limited time, say 6-10 seconds and then automatically re-lock.

Most manuals are available on the web, so if you see one that looks promising, download the manuals (both Programming Manual and Owners Manual) and read them carefully.
 
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Old 04-28-17, 03:50 PM
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Assuming residential construction, wood door/frame, with at least 3" of wood jamb before sidelight. Most electric strikes can be installed in this frame, but you would need to match the strike to the type of lockset you have and there are numerous factors involved here, but for now your posted concern is the routing of the wires.

Again, assuming your question is mainly how to get from the area above the door to the strike area, you might consider using a router with 1/8" bit to groove vertically along the jamb, fit some 22/4 wire (you don't need any bigger) into the groove then patch with wood putty, caulk or whatever. All low-voltage, of course.

Also, you can get fairly small plastic self-adhesive wire mold, which can be painted.

With commercial construction, electric locksets and hinges are the more common solution to situations where strikes can't be used.
 
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