Can you identify this commercial doorknob and tell how to remove it?


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Old 04-27-17, 09:07 AM
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Can you identify this commercial doorknob and tell how to remove it?

The key looks like a Schlage but it doesn't say Schlage on it and the knob has no identifying name or marks.

I found a youtube video on how to remove a Best lock and got the knob off but then it was different than this one.

This is the only walk through door in the house so far so it's pretty urgent to get it replaced.

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Old 04-27-17, 10:32 AM
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You've already gotten the knob off. Have you tried inserting a pin into the hole in the escutcheon? Some have a little spring loaded latch that holds the escutcheon/trim ring in place. Other escutcheons simply spin off (are threaded). Once that's removed you'll have access to the screws holding it in the door.
 
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Old 04-27-17, 10:42 AM
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If you don't have it iff yet, try slipping the tip of a small flat screwdriver just under the estucheon and see if it doesn't pop loose. Don't twist the screwdriver, use it as a lever.
 
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Old 04-27-17, 04:19 PM
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Some commercial lock sets require the key to access further. Insert the key and turn it and it will allow further disassembly.
 
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Old 04-27-17, 07:41 PM
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It may be a Sargent lock set. Look closely at that little hole in the escutcheon, it MAY be a small Allen-head setscrew.
 
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Old 04-28-17, 09:31 AM
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Thanks for the advice. With some persuasion, it did unscrew. The replacement I bought won't work, so I either need to work on this one or buy a new one.

The problem is that the dead lock plunger is going inside the strike plate and then won't open. Sometimes it is just barely in there and pulling the knob toward us when we unlock the door will release it. But the other day it really in there and we couldn't unlock the door. Luckily, we hadn't locked a window, otherwise we would have had a big problem.

Residential locks have a way to adjust where the dead lock plunger hits the plate, but I can't find a way on this one.
 
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Old 04-28-17, 11:24 AM
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Sounds like you need an adjustable strike like this. I found it by searching on adjustable 4 strike .

[ATTACH=CONFIG]80171[/ATTACH]
 
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Old 04-28-17, 04:15 PM
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I recognize the lock as a no-name cheap import and it's common for these locks to bind. Sometimes due to the rather spongy/compliant weatherstripping used on these doors, even when the strike plate is adjusted correctly, slamming the door too hard will allow the d/l pin to pop in. Assuming this door gets plenty of use, you'd be better off replacing it with a heavier duty lock. The cheaper grade 3 locks will break easier when binding, locking you out/in. The better grade 2 and most grade 1 locks will open easier if by chance the d/l pin is projected.

The grade 1 locks also have a physically larger latch that would give you more tolerance with a spongy wxstripping, plus a tad better security.

If you want to keep to a cheap solution, you could replace the deadlatch with a spring latch (cheap, from your local smithy) then you wouldn't have any binding problems. In residential construction, a deadlocking latch offers very little security anyway, especially in grade 2 & 3 locks. That's what deadbolts are for.
 
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Old 04-28-17, 04:31 PM
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Further info on lock grades:

While not a hard & fast guarantee of quality, a locks' "grade" does give an indication of the type of service it is designed for.

Grade 1: heavy duty commercial/industrial; Usually physically a bit larger than grades 2 & 3, they are for 2-3/4" backset holes, altho most manufacturers offer a 2-3/8" backset latch option, special order.

Grade 2: Light-duty commercial/heavy duty residential, home centers sell them with the residential 2-3/8" backset, tho more often nowadays, the latches are convertible to either backset.

Grade 3: residential only, light use, only supplied with 2-3/8" BS.

Grades are not always easy to find (if they're even stated at all) on consumer packaging. Cost is a fair indication tho.
 
 

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