Any hope for this door and lock

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Old 02-28-18, 11:57 AM
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Any hope for this door and lock

As you can see the faceplate of the latch assembly is shifted over to the right, causing the door not to stay closed sometimes. This is because the holes are wallowed out where the latch assembly previously was screwed into the edge of the door. The only way I could screw the latch assembly into the door was shift it to the right, a short term solution.

Is there any way I can fix the original holes where it was screwed in, I've tried wood filler and a few other solutions to no avail. I am about ready to just get a new door.

 
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Old 02-28-18, 12:21 PM
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One way is to simply jab toothpicks covered in wood glue into the old, wallowed out screw holes. A better method is to drill out the wallowed holes and drive in a glue covered wood dowel. Then you can drill fresh screw holes.
 
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Old 02-28-18, 12:23 PM
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A dutchman may work. Basically remove the wood approx 8" long X 1/4" deep section of the door (where the latch pokes through). Install the patch (glue,epoxy). Re drill the holes for the latch. Sand and paint and it'll look new.
 
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Old 02-28-18, 12:31 PM
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Take the knob and latch off. Repair the wood where the screws should go using a dowel and wood glue. Lets say an area about 1/4" wide around the screw has been ruined... You will need to drill a 1/4" hole, maybe 1" deep. Then cut a short piece of 1/4" dowel, glue it with wood glue and hammer it in. Leave it alone for a couple hours while it dries. Then cut, grind or sand it down until its smooth. Then position the latch, and drill pilot holes for your screws with a 3/32" drill bit.
 
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Old 02-28-18, 12:34 PM
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Have you tried using screws at least 2" preferably 3" long to secure the latch? They would have to be pilot drilled at a slight diverging angle so as to not encroach on the lock body. A more secure solution, if you don't mind the looks, is a "wrap-around" sleeve such as available from Don-Jo Mfg Co. However, your door has a rabbeted edge (stepped) so that might prevent a sleeve from working, it just depends on what the door frame looks like to accommodate the door edge. For example, the weatherstripping may interact with the rabbeted edge somehow, that would bind on a sleeve. Years ago, I remember seeing an edge reinforcement for this purpose, that does not "wrap around"...if I find it, I'll post back.
 
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Old 02-28-18, 12:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Pilot Dane View Post
One way is to simply jab toothpicks covered in wood glue into the old, wallowed out screw holes. A better method is to drill out the wallowed holes and drive in a glue covered wood dowel. Then you can drill fresh screw holes.
Wouldn't the dowel splinter when you drill into it?
 
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Old 02-28-18, 12:41 PM
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Well Duh....They're right there on the Don-Jo website... they call them a "mortise conversion" plate, but they would work for your purpose, tho you would need to mortise the door's edge a little, if you want it to sit flush and look nice.
 
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Old 02-28-18, 01:24 PM
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Dowels have worked fine for me any number of times. I prefer this method over the quicker one of putting toothpicks or golf tees in the hole, although they generally work okay too. Possibly overkill, but since the lockset is actually shifted, so it's more than just a stripped screw hole, I would typically clamp the door to the correct thickness so that it doesn't push out, drill the hole, insert the dowel, and let it dry for as long as possible. Not trying to sell anything, but I'd use Titebond III.
 
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Old 03-14-18, 01:20 PM
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you can purchase a DIY product called Plast-Aid. It's a 2 part powder and ointment that when combined forms a moulding agent and in it's pliable state is like a putty that you can fill the worn wood holes. It hardens quickly and can be drilled, sanded, painted etc.

about $22 from memory
 
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