Are latch plates supposed to stick out so far that they cut my arm?

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  #1  
Old 06-25-18, 06:04 PM
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Are latch plates supposed to stick out so far that they cut my arm?

This is a IRC modular house, that we had put on our lot in 2004. The latch plates stick out so far from the wood, that they keep cutting my arm as I walk by them. Are they supposed to stick out that far beyond the wood?

 
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  #2  
Old 06-25-18, 06:08 PM
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No, those look about 1/2" too wide. Most are also rounded, with no sharp edges.
They also aren't screwed down tight.
 
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Old 06-25-18, 06:40 PM
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Not sure what Xsleepers seeing that I'm not, but any latch plate I've seen was flush with the jamb not sticking out like that.
No way is it 1/2" to wide
No clue how you could be cutting yourself on a surface like that.
Want all rounded outside edges, buy a new latch plate and chisile out the jamb so it sits flush with the jamb.
 
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Old 06-25-18, 07:00 PM
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It looks like something got caught on that strike plate and has it bent away from the wood. There is no way you could cut it in deep enough where you didn't get hooked on it. Yes.... it should be recessed a little deeper but maybe a plate swap is in order.

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  #5  
Old 06-26-18, 04:07 AM
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It doesn't appear to be mortised into the jamb. That should help a little. You could just bend the end that sticks out toward the casing - that would help a lot. Ideally you'd install conventional strike plates like the one that Pete pictured.
 
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Old 06-26-18, 06:35 AM
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When I first read this post I thought that XSLPR was correct. Then I checked all my doors, including those I installed. The striker plates all stick out beyond the framing and band back Never got caught on one. I think the OP's was bent out or not properly recessed as others have pointed out.
 
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Old 06-26-18, 11:40 AM
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Ok, I took some more photos, to clarify this. You can SEE which ones are good and which ones can cut me - especially that worst one! That last photo is the one that keeps snagging and cutting my arm, and I have scars from it!

It looks like PJMAX has a great idea. I need to measure these and find some new ones that are angled like that, so the bad ones won't cut me.








 
  #8  
Old 06-26-18, 03:58 PM
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Wow...your photo's show shoddy workmanship that unfortunately, is not uncommon in the manufactured/ modular housing industry; it's all about the speed of assembly, therefore no mortising or pilot holes for the strike plates.

Your local locksmith will probably have dozens of the rounder type plate as shown in Pjmax's post....we tend to accumulate them when replacing locks that don't need new strike plates. Eventually they're thrown out after taking up too much space. If you just need one, they're likely to just hand you one free.

Otherwise, as marksr indicated, you can take the plate off and, using a couple pair of pliers, bend more curve into the plate...it won't affect the latching of the door.

A word about trying to mortise the plate into the jamb...if the unmortised appearance doesn't bother you, it's probably more trouble than it's worth to try to chisel or mortise in the plate; a lot of these manufactured houses use door jambs made of a type of engineered wood-like material that reminds me of Masonite... and the finish look is really a plastic like material that self-adheres to the surface, so you might end up with a mess on your hands, if you try to mortise in the plate. (Unless you happen to be a professional carpenter).
 
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Old 06-26-18, 04:43 PM
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Thanks rstripe! What you say is true. And the company is now out of business, since the housing recession in 2007. And someone was telling me later, that we could have had a stick built house done for little more than the price of this one - especially since the builder ripped us off for about $30k.

I'll take the worst one off and look for a beveled replacement like that. Thanks!
 

Last edited by Melissa2012B; 06-26-18 at 05:24 PM.
  #10  
Old 06-27-18, 06:50 AM
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Mortising the striker plate may result in the door latch not catching. Remove the striker plate and use a vise to increase the arc of the radius end, Clamp the striker plate vertically in a vise with a bolt (diameter twice the radius of the curved end of the striker plate) sandwiched against the radius of the striker plate. Place a piece of wood (larger than the striker plate) against the striker plate and hammer the wood to increase the arc length. Good luck
 
  #11  
Old 06-27-18, 10:41 AM
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Common hardware used in pre-manufactured housing, meant to give lots of options on install (slop). Read the above post, his solution is perfect. If you do not want to go to the hassle of making all those bends, get a bulk pack of standard plates, and do NOT mortise them unless your margin (space between jamb and door) is too tight, which is unlikely since the originals are not, and I do not think I have EVER seen a pre-manufactured home use mortised hardware.
 
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