Lock for metal gate -- need replaceable cylinder

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  #1  
Old 02-04-19, 02:58 AM
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Lock for metal gate -- need replaceable cylinder

I have a metal gate with a lock on it. It works well, but I'm tired of having an entire lock cut off and a new one welded on whenever I need to re-key.

1) Does anyone know what the type of lock in the picture is called?

2) Does anyone know of a type or brand that allows the cylinder to be replaced without cutting the lock off/re-welding?
 
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  #2  
Old 02-04-19, 06:34 AM
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Here is one company among many:

https://www.bestaccess.com/products/keys-and-cores/
 
  #3  
Old 02-04-19, 07:28 AM
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It appears to be a deadbolt lock. You should be able to remove the cylinder/key portion of the lock and replace it with a compatible unit. The need to cut and re-weld each time may depend on the original design and installation. Was the lock's enclosure welded shut on both the interior and exterior surfaces? If yes then you might need to redesign the interior access, possibly to include some carriage bolts. Carriage bolts would allow you access but present only rounded surfaces to the outside.
 
  #4  
Old 02-05-19, 10:48 PM
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This is a Rim lock with latch and double cylinder deadbolt, and not very common in the USA. They're used extensively in Mexico (where they're made under several brand names) and Latin America, and tho I don't have first hand knowledge, I'd guess Western Europe, as I think that's where the design originated. When I lived in Latin America it was common to see them welded on steel gates and doors, because the labor costs were so cheap in relation to the lock, that to rekey the lock, the spot welds were patiently filed or ground off, then re-spot welded back on.

As you can see, there are holes at the corners of the lock & strike plate to accept screws, and that's the way it should be installed, either with "one-way" screws ( that can actually be removed with the proper tool) or "tamperproof" screws, such as "security Torx" design or similar. Since you've had to replace this lock several times, I'd be curious where your contractor is obtaining them, as most suppliers in the States don't carry these.

At any rate, next time tell them to screw it on, don't weld it.

If this is, for example, rental property, where you have to rekey it often, Removable Core type lock cylinders, like Wirepuller38's link shows, would be ideal, and altho the outside cylinder is probably of universal "Rim Cylinder" dimensions, and thereby being replaceable with a Removable Core type, the inside cylinder is generally nor standardized, and is of different design for each manufacturer, so the inside cylinder would not lend itself to this design.
 
  #5  
Old 02-05-19, 10:55 PM
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On some models of these Rim locks, the key not only retracts the deadbolt, but further turning will retract the latch as well. If this one works that way, and you keep the gate locked most of the time, you could weld some expanded metal around the lock area, to prevent hands from pulling the inside latch open, and thereby use common screws to fasten the lock. Just a thought.
 
  #6  
Old 02-10-19, 12:22 PM
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Rstripe, you have it exactly right.

This is a rental property in Latin America -- everyone uses these types of locks and they have to be cut off/new ones attached on every tenant move.

People are used to seeing things welded, so I don't know if they would understand/believe that the security/tamperproof screws are secure.

Ideally, I would replace the inside keyway with something that can be turned by hand and put some metal around it to keep hands away. Unfortunately, one often reaches through the gate to retract the inside latch if the deadbolt is unlocked. This makes putting a hand-deterring border around the entire lock to enable use of screws a bit complicated.
 
  #7  
Old 02-11-19, 05:05 PM
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Your best bet would be working with a local full-line locksmith, who's familiar with these rim locks. Of course, the initial expense of changing the locking arrangement would need to be justified by how many times you anticipate rekeying the lock and how long you'll own the property. So offhand, a few ideas come to mind.

Least expensive, but have to meet ALL these criteria:
1) Existing lock in good repair.
2) Can install screen material to block hands for reasonable $.
3) Outside cylinder is standard USA Rim type, or close enough.
4) Cylinder can be removed by locksmith without destroying lock.
5) Outside key will retract latch as well as deadbolt.
In this case, an inexpensive Removable Core Rim Cylinder can be installed.
Since the inside cylinder is integral to the main lock body, it's not replaceable, so you'd have to leave an old key in it so the deadbolt could be locked from the inside, if desired. (The screen would prevent access, and a slight modification of the key would prevent it from being removed from the lock).

Next option, would be if you or your local locksmith knows of a company that makes a Rim lock like this in a Removable Core design. I myself am not aware of any, but I'm only aware of the US market.

Most radical option might be to get a steel lock box, designed to accept standard US type deadbolts and knob locks. King Architectural Metals has a line of these boxes, designed to be welded to steel gates. A section of your gate would be cut out and the box welded in place. This way, you have wide range of lock designs, finishes and levels of security that can be installed on the box.
 
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Old 02-11-19, 05:19 PM
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Yet another idea, if you want a higher level of security, but would probably end up costing more, would be to use the weldable box as previously stated, but install a restricted/registered/non-duplicable key type deadbolt, double or single cylinder. These are usually harder to pick and drill open. In this scenario, the renter pays a deposit on the keys (to impress on them not to loose them) and when returned you'll have the peace of mind that they weren't duplicated. These keys are available in Removable Core design as well. Again, an experienced full-line locksmith in any medium to large size city in Latin America should be aware of these options.

BTW, which country are we talking about?
 
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