Removal of Double Keyed Deadbolt - Best / KeyMark

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-04-19, 02:01 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2019
Location: USA
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Removal of Double Keyed Deadbolt - Best / KeyMark

We are trying to remove a deadbolt that is keyed on both the exterior and interior. The key cylinder is a KeyMark (Medeco) and the striker plate says Best. We tried removing the striker plate but it is clearly tied in with the deadbolt itself and so can't be removed until we can remove the deadbolt itself. There is no obvious place around the cylinder face of the deadbolt on either side to insert a tool to pry the cover off or to access a set screw, etc as suggested in many other posts. There doesn't appear to be a thin ring around the outer edge to remove the faceplate. We have the key and tried the suggestion of turning the key 15 degrees to remove the cylinder - no luck. We are stumped as to how to access any screws to aid in removal. We are hesitant to just drill it out as this deadbolt is installed on a 2 inch thick door and if our replacement deadbolt doesn't work for some reason, we won't be able to reinstall the old deadbolt if we ruin it while removing. It's hard to find deadbolts for 2 inch thick doors without specially ordering and we don't want to risk having this door unlocked in case the replacement doesn't fit for some reason. Any ideas on how to get the faceplate off or remove the deadbolt without ruining it?
 
Attached Images   
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-04-19, 09:40 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 1,292
Received 4 Votes on 4 Posts
You'll need the "Control" key (AKA the "Core" key) to remove the core, then the cover falls off to reveal the screws. You said you have the key, but the operating key is different than the Control key, which will only turn 15 degrees clockwise, to allow removal.
 
  #3  
Old 05-05-19, 07:28 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2019
Location: USA
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you. I certainly appreciate your insight on this. We have several keys but none of them appear to be the control key. I suppose that means that drilling out is the only option. At least we know now! Thanks again.
 
  #4  
Old 05-05-19, 11:44 AM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 1,292
Received 4 Votes on 4 Posts
You might do a little sleuthing to find out what became of the control key...it will have different cuts on it and usually has "CONTROL" stamped on it. The Keymark line is fairly new, so whoever installed the lock should still have the key. If a locksmith installed it, he may have the key safeguarded for hopeful future service.

If you have to drill it, you might call an experienced smithy, as most will at least try to pick the lock to the "control" position before resorting to force; these are not easy to pick, and luck plays as much a part as skill, as most times, a successful picking will be to the operating condition, and not the control position, which is the goal.

I've not had to drill these locks, but will submit that, being on the inside, the cover plate, while fairly thick, is just brass, with no anti-drill features. If you look at various brands of double deadbolts, you'll see that the "Tie" screws are usually located in very similar places, and in this case, are most likely socket (Allen) screws. I would start with a 1/8" bit and drill right in line with where you estimate the heads to be, just until penetrating the cover, then go larger, again, being careful to not punch through the cover with too much force, and damage the tie screws. With some patience you should uncover enough of the screw head so as to remove them. This will not solve your missing control key, but at least you can re-install the lock.
 
  #5  
Old 05-05-19, 05:56 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2019
Location: USA
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
So , to add to the mystery.... we have several keys but only one of them opens the lock on both sides. The remainder only unlock from the exterior. The one that unlocks both interior and exterior does not act as the control key, or at least so it seems. Is it normal to have keys that only open from the exterior and one that would open both? Could this be the key to removing the cylinder (pun intended)? We just bought this place from the estate of a person who passed away so our ability to locate the control key is gone.
 
  #6  
Old 05-05-19, 08:54 PM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,416
Received 62 Votes on 58 Posts
Sounds like the lock has been master keyed. As rstripe said, the control key will normally be clearly marked.
 
  #7  
Old 05-06-19, 08:43 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 1,292
Received 4 Votes on 4 Posts
The control key will not operate the lock in the normal manner; it will only turn 15 degrees, at which point the core will slide out. However, once removed, you can take a screwdriver or similar, and turn the cam to lock or unlock the bolt.

Sounds like the previous owner wanted to prevent some family members (the kids?) from being able to lock the bolt from inside, yet still give them access from outside, perhaps to reduce the risk of them locking themselves in, then misplacing the key...who knows. It is not common to see this arrangement. It is also not common to see removable core locks in a residence; such locks are more costly, their purpose being to facilitate quick key changes by the owner, at a moments notice, without having to wait for a locksmith. Usually found in large commercial or retail properties, where frequent tenant turnover justifies the initial cost.

It could be that the previous owner was in charge of said type of property, and this lock could be part of that system, allowing him to carry a master key that fit his home and commercial property. And, tho not likely, it's possible that an unscrupulous (unethical) locksmith installed the removable core lock, without even telling the owner about this feature, with the goal of keeping the control key, purportedly to facilitate future lock work, but of course, having the control key allows you to unlock the door in seconds, as mentioned above. But like cops, the vast majority of locksmiths are honest, ethical, and in most states, licenced and bonded, and would never use their knowledge for illicit personal gain.

Still, if it were myself who moved into a home where the control key was nowhere to be found, I'd change the lock.
 
  #8  
Old 05-10-19, 06:33 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2019
Location: USA
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you for your replies and advice Rstripe and Stickshift.

The old lock is off! We took a magnifying glass and looked at the regular key head. On it was a very faint phone number for a local company. We called and they had the control key which they gave us for no charge. As you advised, that was all that was needed!

As an aside Rstripe, I'm not sure why this particular lock was on the residential (not rental) condo of an elderly woman who owned it for the past 40 years. All I can say is that there were many things in the home, such as plumbing and electrical work, that were so far from code compliant, it was scary. It seems she had some unqualified and unscrupulous help over the years. We are gutting it to the cement -- except for the pretty entry door on which the old lock was located! Thanks again guys!
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: