Removing doorknob rosette cover

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Old 10-24-20, 04:24 PM
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Removing doorknob rosette cover

Trying to replace an interior privacy bedroom door knob. Unknown brand.

A lever allows me to remove the knob from the interior side. I would like to remove the rosette cover to access the screws that hold the mechanism together.

I can unscrew the rosette cover on the exterior (key) side so that it slides to the knob on that side. But on the interior side, the rosette cover turns, but is not threaded in any way and it will not slide off of the interior end.

There is a tiny hole at the base of the ring that holds the rosette cover in place, but there is apparently no screw or lever inside of that hole. I've tried inserting all kinds of things, including a drill bit in case it's gunked up. Even sent some WD40 in there. If there's a screw or lever in there, it's not revealing itself.

There is also what looks like the end of a wire next to the shaft between the base of the interior side and the door, but trying to move that wire around - even getting pliers on it - doesn't seem to do anything. The rosette cover turns freely but will not move up the shaft at all.

I do not have the key for this door - no way to get one as far as I know.

Any ideas? I can attach pictures if that will help. Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 10-24-20, 04:32 PM
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If I'm following you I think that there is a corresponding slot in the rosette that needs to be turned to line up with that wire, (like a spring clip) then the wire needs to be depressed slightly and the rosette will pop straight off, exposing the screws that hold the handle on.
 
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Old 10-24-20, 05:41 PM
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I appreciate you looking at this issue. Pictures might help. I tried messing with the wire and rotating the rosette cover, but that didn't seem to help.

A. Shows the hole in the shaft in front of the cover - that is from a knob where the shaft was apparently installed upside down - most others in the house it's on the bottom. I've tried a lot of things with this hole - I don't think there's a screw or lever in there.

B. The exterior side of the knob in question, to help with identification.

C. The interior side, with the interior knob removed. The rosette cover, which turns freely, but will not go up the shaft.

D. The shaft, which does not rotate, corresponding to A in the other picture.

E. Also seemingly part of the shaft - D and E do not budge in relation to the shaft.

F. Lighting being really poor in this room, that's the wire. It seems to jut out from the shaft, but further in than the rosette cover.


 
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Old 10-24-20, 05:54 PM
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When you have a hole (A) you often need to push a push pin into it and depress a "button" for lack of a better word, which is a release. You might need to pry behind the rosette with a thin putty knife or pull on the knob on the opposite side while you insert a push pin into that hole. A small allen wrench often works well as you can push down on it fairly easily.
 
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Old 10-24-20, 07:04 PM
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It would be helpful to know the brand.....which is usually stamped on the latch plate. It's an unusual design, but on Schlage and many others, a spanner tool is used to engage the hole to unscrew the collar (ring). Without the tool, a channel lock pliers can be used, but you risk scratching up the collar, plus if you squeeze too hard, it can deform the collar. You can also "drift" the collar around with a small hammer and flat blade screwdriver until it becomes easy to turn by hand. There's usually a plastic friction bushing under it which causes the collar to resist turning, even when loose from the door.
 
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Old 10-24-20, 08:52 PM
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Yes, the strike plate indicates it's a Schlage. Is the purpose of the little hole simply to provide a place for the Schlage spanner to fit? In my search for ideas, some have said the door handle needs to be at a certain angle while this is going on - is that likely?

Since I have about 40 of these in the house, I wouldn't mind trying to find the right spanner - seems eBayers offer them from time to time.Any way to determine which size I would need?

Again, thanks for taking the time to respond.
 
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Old 10-25-20, 01:19 PM
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Using channel-lock pliers, I brute-forced a collar in front of the rosette cover, then the cover itself. Not sure why they wouldn't turn by hand like the outside cover. So they're a bit scratched up and I don't see this as a good solution for the others - mostly because of the time it took. If I continue replacing these, I will try to find the proper custom spanner from Schlage, though I'm not certain the custom spanner will be enough to move the collar as well.
 
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Old 10-26-20, 12:36 PM
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Using pliers will likely deform the ring and make it harder to unscrew....stop by your local locksmith and see if they'll give you a spanner tool....they used to come with every lockset, and most locksmiths collect so many they just start throwing them away. The advice that the handle/knob/lever needs to be turned is true on some brands in order to remove the knob/lever itself, not the rosette. At any rate, this does not apply to Schlage, AFAIK.

If the locks are many years old, the plastic bushing can harden and make the ring/collar hard to remove, without the tool.

Also, this method is used by several brands, and their tools are slightly different, so ideally, you'd want a Schlage tool, as it will fit best.
 
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