Deadbolts Without Full Extension

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Old 01-20-21, 08:38 PM
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Deadbolts Without Full Extension

I see time and again properties where, you turn the deadbolt, hear it hitting the jamb, and can see it's not extending completely when it's supposed to lock.

On the inside it is easy enough to insert a screwdriver and walk the bolt back completely so it's unlocked.

What about the outside? My question is whether this is a security risk. Can the bolt also be walked back somehow by inserting something thing to shift the bolt over to open position?

If not that, can the bolt be shifted back with a strong magnet? Thanks in advance!

 
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Old 01-21-21, 10:03 AM
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When a deadbolt is fully extended, it is "locked in place", usually by some connection point going over-center. So if a deadbolt is not fully extended, it is subject to being "walked back".

As far as using a magnet, the theory might be sound, but I see many obstacles to it being done.
 
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Old 01-21-21, 10:09 AM
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If this is an issue you would just deepen the bore so that it fully extends. The rest of the discussion is kind of a mute point.
 
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Old 01-21-21, 10:16 AM
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For good or bad, appearance is almost everything.
 
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Old 01-21-21, 02:56 PM
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Not knowing your frame clearance etc, hard to say how easily the bolt could be "walked back", but the fix is so easy, just do it, and have the peace of mind. If you're picky about appearance, Schlage has a strike plate kit that comes with a black plastic cup that goes behind the plate, so you don't see a hole into the gap between door frame and wall stud. (Sometimes deepening the hole in the frame breaks out into the hollow area between frame and stud).
 
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Old 01-21-21, 07:39 PM
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So I am aware of the solution, and boring out the hole. But there is something bigger beyond this being a moot point. And that is that are a few hundred houses with this problem in a certain rural area, created by the same builder.
 
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Old 01-21-21, 08:04 PM
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Closed and locked inswinging doors are behind a 1/2" stop so it would be pretty hard to get a tool in there to shimmy. Much easier to just kick it in or break a window instead. With the advent of cordless tools anyone with a cordless sawzall can break into any house anywhere anytime, so I don't think I'd be too concerned about a deadbolt that is 90-95% all the way locked.
 
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Old 01-23-21, 05:23 PM
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Not surprising.....general contractors have to hire licensed tradesmen to do plumbing and electrical, but when it comes to hanging doors and installing locks, it's usually low paid laborers doing that. I find similar discrepancies on commercial properties where doors are equipped with closers....they're seldom adjusted properly. The installers slap them on, with whatever factory adjustment they come with, and move on to the next one....time is money.
 
 

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