I cant align the 2 key slots on a Kwikset double cylinder deadbolt


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Old 08-17-22, 09:30 PM
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Unhappy I cant align the 2 key slots on a Kwikset double cylinder deadbolt

I am stumped how I can not put this deadbolt back on my door! its an older model kwikset double deadbolt. there are 2 long thin bolts that (I think!?!) should be inserted thru the 'inside cylinder mechanism" and then thread into the 'outside cylinder mechanism". however the sscrew holes dont align in a way that the key slots will be vertical on both sides. what am i missing!?!?

I should note, the inside part has an beefy circular plate that has 4 holes and it seems 2 smaller screws hold this plate to the inside cylinder mechanism. the other 2 holes are pass thru for the 2 long bolts. im not even sure what this 'extra' plate does.
 
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Old 08-18-22, 03:51 AM
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Hard telling what you're doing wrong. The plate holds the exterior half of the deadbolt for one thing. After it's installed then you install the interior half. And make sure you don't have the deadbolt latch installed upside down. Consult the instructions.
 
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Old 08-18-22, 05:11 AM
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I've never found an easy way to do this and if it's not lining up on both sides, you will see it when you're done, like you're describing. The best way I've found to do it is have the screws sticking all the way through from the inside you have a small gap on the outside where you might be able to see what you're doing to line up that piece.
 
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Old 08-18-22, 05:51 AM
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Sounds like the deadbolt is upside down. Look at the deadbolt in the door, in particular the hub thru which the "shafts" on the cylinders pass. Now look at the holes the cylinder mounting screws go thru.

Those holes should be slightly higher than the hub. If they aren't, remove the screws holding the deadbolt in, pull it part way out and rotate the bolt 180 . Now try installing the cylinders.

Let us know what does or does not work.
 
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Old 08-18-22, 07:55 AM
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thanks all for quick responses!. after a good night sleep, i realize my mistake is that the long thin bolts do NOT go from inside cylinder to outside cylinder. they simply go to that beefy circular plate that hangs in the middle. there are also 2 shorter bolts that connect the outside cylinder to this same plate. IE both cylinders are attached to this plate and not to each other...

I did unfortunately destroy 4 tiny springs. no replacement springs came with my 'rekey pin kit'. can i operate the locks without the springs...gravity will help push those upper pins down ?
 
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Old 08-18-22, 08:09 AM
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If you are talking about the tumbler springs. NO, the lock will not work without them and may jam.
 
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Old 08-18-22, 11:52 AM
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can i operate the locks without the springs...gravity will help push those upper pins down ?
Gravity is your friend here, but I wouldn't "bet the farm" on it. After inserting the key, you may have to turn the key back and forth a few times to get the bottom pin in place.

If you keep they cylinder(s) well lubricated with dry powdered graphite, you may not have a great deal of problems.
https://www.clksupplies.com/collecti...weiser-kwikset
 
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Old 08-18-22, 12:35 PM
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thanks for the link to purchase the springs! i may try to dissect an old lock if i can find one

i think another alternative if im missing 1 or 2 ssprings is to simply not put pins in those particular tumblers. now my lock be less secure with 3 rather than 5 but it wont jam ?
 
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Old 08-18-22, 04:58 PM
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You can leave out a few springs and their corresponding top & bottom pins in the INSIDE cylinder, being on the more secure side of the door anyway. Do NOT leave out a pin chamber spring without also removing it's top & bottom pins
(sometimes called the "key pin" and "driver pin"). The least amount of debris accumulating in the keyhole will eventually give trouble. I would not leave more than (3) chambers vacant, and the remaining "working" chambers should be chosen to be in any of the first (4) pin chambers (the 1st being closest to the key bow). Choose the deepest cuts on the key for the working chambers, to prevent the key from being removed in any position except the standard "12 o'clock" position.

OR....

If you happen to pass a locksmith shop in your travels, stop in and they'll by glad to give you a few springs, gratis.
 
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Old 09-14-22, 11:32 AM
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I was able to get my deadbolt working! it required a little bit of imagination to see how to align the vairous plates. basically both sides of the mechanism attach to a thick beefy center disk for security I guess.

my local locksmith gave me a few tiny springs (i bought a couple keys from him). its very easy to send those springs flying when you remove the thin retaining cover.

interesting to note: he told me the tolerance on the pins for a lock like mine is 10 one thousands of an inch. very hard to eyeball that ! but if you put them when the key is inserted you can actually see if they are flush with the cylinder. thanks for everyones help!

locks are a work of mechanical genious!
 
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Old 09-14-22, 10:25 PM
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The "thin retaining cover" is usually crimped in place and not designed to be removed. We remove the plug (core) by first removing the retaining "C" clip, then using a "Follower" tool, which can be any cylindrical object such as a dowel or pipe of aprox. the same diameter as the plug, then with the key inserted and turned, the follower is used to push out the plug, thereby retaining the top (driver) pins in place. Now, with the plug in hand, it's quite easy to test different key pin lengths and observe their positions.

For Kwikset, there are (7) bottom (key) pin lengths, with 0.023" between each length step, which means that comparing (2) pins side by side on the bench, one step apart, is quite easy with average eyes. Kwikset tolerances are fairly sloppy compared to other pin-tumbler locks, and the smithy that told you 0.010" I would agree with, meaning, plus or minus 0.010" and still have the key work. On a worn cylinder, I'd say plus or minus 0.015"
even.
 
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