Door is slamming shut


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Old 01-08-23, 11:19 AM
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Door is slamming shut

Hello. My front door is slamming behind me. It wasn't doing it until some workers were in here and propped the door open. No clue what they might have done. These two videos illustrate the problem. Please tell me how to fix it, what parts to get, and where to buy them. Thanks!

https://youtu.be/ZQh0Bm1RASA

https://youtu.be/nAwju4Hhbxw
 
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Old 01-09-23, 06:44 AM
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While I agree with the spring hinge comments, I have something to add. But that will be addressed after the latch.

From your video, it appears the top screw holding the face of the latch (lower rectangular plate on the edge of the door) is missing. It also appears that the bottom screw on that latch face is the wrong type; likely a sheetmetal screw instead of an 8-32 machine screw. These screws should be flat-head with an undercut, as shown below.

The undercut is required to allow the screw head contact the latch face before bottoming out. The top screw was probably a sheetmetal screw as well, meaning the threads on both mounting tabs are damaged. The damaged threads can be remedied with Type-J or Type-U (illustrated below) 8-32 Tinnerman nuts.


Your best source for the 8-32 flathead screws with an undercut is a local locksmith shop; tell them you need screws to secure a latch in a metal door. The best source for the Tinnerman nuts would be a hardware store. The lock rstripe is probably referring to are the handles that retract the latch.

Now to the slamming door. I suspect that prior to the HVAC installers opening your ceiling, the hallway was acting as a compressive stop. You can probably slam a bedroom door, but try slamming the door on a closet! As the door approaches the jamb at relatively high-speed, it tries to compress the air in the closet, slowing the door. If there are unsealed openings above the ceiling between your apartment and the hallway, the hole in your ceiling allows the air pressure to equalize, causing your door to slam. Once the hole in the ceiling is repaired, you may find you need to increase the closing force of the spring hinges.

Nothing to do with the original problem, but the wall between the hallway and your apartment is a firewall and as such, all wall penetrations must be sealed in an approved manner that does not lessen the rating of the firewall. I would think the scope of the work requires permits which should trigger inspections. If it were me, I would stick my head in that hole and look for penetrations of the firewall, both old and new.
 
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Old 01-08-23, 12:06 PM
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Your door has spring hinges. Previous to the work, they must have been "set" to have no spring. Whoever worked on it must have reset the springs to a new setting that made them work the way they were intended to. If you live in a building that has a maintenence guys, that would explain it. They are now operating the way they are supposed to. If you don't like it, adjust them back to the way they used to operate. You wind the spring with a tool on top or bottom, then pull out the set pin and adjust which hole it is in for more or less spring action.
 
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Old 01-08-23, 12:18 PM
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Your video shows you have spring hinges.....spring hinges can be adjusted to provide varying degrees of closing force, or no force at all. Apparently, someone has increased the force adjustment. A spring hinge has a loose pin that's inserted into one of several holes, and held in place by spring tension. You'll see a slot that allows you to insert a poke tool, such as a small Allen wrench, in order to increase or decrease the tension. The slot will reveal a hole for the poke tool, to allow you to releave the pressure on the pin so you can re-position it or remove it entirely. You might need needle-nose pliers or tweezers to remove the pin. I would simply remove one or more pins to allow those springs to "unwind".

The latch problem could be due to misalignment, which can happen if the lock becomes a bit loose, and shifts on the door. Loosen the screws up a bit more and re-position the lock for better alignment, and re-tighten.
 
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Old 01-08-23, 02:19 PM
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The latch problem could be due to misalignment, which can happen if the lock becomes a bit loose, and shifts on the door. Loosen the screws up a bit more and re-position the lock for better alignment, and re-tighten.
What is the "lock"? There is a latch (the part that was stuck) and the latch assembly frame. The only lock I see is the deadbolt above a few inches above the latch and assembly.
 
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Old 01-08-23, 03:09 PM
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Thanks. I adjusted the hinges, and now the door is closing properly. My question about the latch and adjusting the "lock" still stands.
 
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Old 01-10-23, 07:12 PM
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WOW TOM that was incredible.I'm going to look at the latch issue this weekend.

I think they've sealed everything for now. This is a high-rise and the condo association and management are very thorough here.

Again, now that I've adjusted the location of the pin, I'm not having the problem. But I have to go back and review what I've done in light of what you've said.

Thanks!
 
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Old 01-10-23, 11:01 PM
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Good illustrations by ThisOldMan, and yes, by "lock" I refer to the levers portion, ie., the main chassis or body, which interconnects with the latch internally. One problem with some Residential Duty, or Grade 2, locks (or Passage sets, in your case) is the lack of indexing tabs on the roses, and/or lack of indexing slots on the residential metal skin of the door, the purpose of which is to properly position the main body correctly to the latch interface. (Commercial metal doors, and Grade 1 locks always have these indexing tabs and slots), Without the indexing, the body tends to shift with use unless the screws are really tight, but too tight tends to crush the door unless properly reinforced (usually a wood block, but even then, a soft pine block will deform somewhat). Because of the ergonomics, levers tend to shift more easily than knobs. Also, your photo shows the latch somewhat "sunken in" too far, as though the reinforcing frame has shifted, and this could also cause misalignment. Also, the brand name of the passage set I see is "Cal-Royal", a long-time West Coast importer of inexpensive door hardware; Their Grade 1 (Commercial) hardware offers reasonable durability at a good price, but their Grade 2 & 3 can be somewhat persnickety.
 
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Old 01-11-23, 04:10 AM
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I'll take my architect hat out of retirement for a few minutes and add to what ThisOldMan said about the door slamming. In buildings with multiple living units, code requires a fire rating all around each apartment for LIFE SAFETY, including the doors to public hallways. To get that fire rating, the door has to be self closing AND self latching and spring hinges are an inexpensive way to achieve that. An option is a UL rated hydraulic closer like you typically see in stores; there might even be hydraulic closers on the building stairway exit doors. Maybe management would consider changing out the spring hinges for a hydraulic closer, but there would be a cost involved. Last I heard years ago, an installed closer ran around $250.
 
 

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