malfunction with front door


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Old 01-15-23, 08:01 AM
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malfunction with front door

my deadbolt keyed entry set is not working ...likely a replacement, but thought I'd ask 1st...
from the interior, turn R works fine..just when turning to the L the cylinder does not retract all the way and gets caught up...lubricating and cursing at it have not worked, so wondering if there is a "trick" someone has to offer, before I go and replace it ? it is a single cylinder deadbolt, then the exterior is the "push-type" door handle set ... thanx !
 
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Old 01-15-23, 09:17 AM
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They all work with rods and cams, if it's old it's probably just worn.

What make? Many manufactures offer life time warranties to the whoever installed. A few years ago I was able to get all new electronic door sets because the finish had failed after 15 years.
 
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Old 01-15-23, 03:54 PM
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Does the difficulty occur on the outside with the key, as well? If not, throw the bolt, then remove the thumbturn and see if it turns freely. If it does, remove the outer cylinder and put a dab of light grease on the "lazy cam" (where the flat actuating bar is held under a cap at the end of the keyway plug. With the key removed, this bar [called the "tailpiece"], should rotate freely through 180 degrees).
If the key hangs up too, remove the thumbturn as before, and lube (with machine oil, motor oil, anything but WD40) the actual bolt cam and slide. If unsure of these parts, just slather some oil on the whole thing. If that doesn't work, it's "wore out" as we say in the South. (It should go without saying, the difficulty is assumed to be the same with door open? If not, the door has shifted and the bolt is not aligning with the strike plate or hole in frame).
 
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Old 01-24-23, 07:48 AM
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sorry ...I did Not get as specific as I should have ...the deadbolt portion of the handle set, works w/o issue
it is all the handle / latch portion, which I DID replace...however, the knucklehead that is me, I realized...after doing all the "replacing" I did Not use the new "backplate" that came with the replacement latch...and though it seems to work fine, and searches do not tell, 1 way or the other...do I Need that Backplate ? the faceplate seems, to me, secure screwed into the door ..but again , will ask here

thanx
 
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Old 01-24-23, 08:07 AM
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Nothing to do with the backplate, which is only for looks... If the latch does not retract when operated, its likely you need to replace the latch. If this it the type you drive in with a hammer, it's entirely possible that you ruined it while installing it.
 
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Old 01-24-23, 08:42 AM
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the "backplate" is the backing, for the faceplate, as I understand it..there's no "looks" as it is covered...by the faceplate.... the latch, as I mentioned, works fine, despite me forgetting to install the "backplate" when I did the replacement...the backplate slides over the latch cylinder, to clarify, then the faceplate, when screwed into the door, butts up against the backplate... the entire purpose of the backplate eludes me...thus asking here ,,,, if it is actually working ok, does the backplate need to be there ?

thanx
 
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Old 01-24-23, 08:44 AM
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backplate

 
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Old 01-24-23, 08:52 AM
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Yes, you need to use that plate when you assemble the latch faceplate. I thought you were referring to the backplate for the strike plate.
 
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Old 01-24-23, 10:20 AM
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terms elude me ...thanx
but...the reason ?
why, if it is currently working w/o the plate, it still needs to be installed?
looking at some other doors around the house, don't see them ...

thanx
 
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Old 01-24-23, 11:16 AM
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It helps hold the latch securely at the correct depth in the mortise, and perfectly centers it on the face plate. It's also used to interchangeably snap on the radius corner and square face plates. If you didn't use it, it's possible that your latch is not perfectly centered in within the latch face plate, which might cause it to bind.

Depending on the brand, some latches don't have them. It's not something you really see once installed unless you disassemble it.
 
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Old 01-24-23, 12:22 PM
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XSleeper has explained this very well. I can only add that in the old days, this "backing plate" was riveted to the faceplate, so there was no interchangeability. The purpose of the backing plate (other than adding some strength) was so that the latch tube tabs could be loosely sandwiched between said plate and the faceplate, which then allows for some flexibility to account for left, right or flat door edge bevels, plus allows for some minor misalignments of door prep. Nowadays, I'm guessing these backing plates come as loose parts to be assembled at installation, to allow for (as XSleepeer said) square or radiused faceplates. I imagine it simplifies packaging also, to accommodate the various faceplate finishes available.
 
 

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