door locks

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  #1  
Old 02-15-02, 12:15 PM
Dennis Johnson
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door locks

My wife and I are moving into a new home and are changing out all of the locks and deadbolts. Holes are drilled, we are simply wanting to change out all of the locks with new ones so they look better and for security reasons. How hard is this task? Are there special tools required and what are the pitfalls,if any?
 
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  #2  
Old 02-15-02, 01:15 PM
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Check your new locks to make sure the hole sizes required match your old ones. Some manufacturers use different size holes. Also make sure the backset matches or that the new locks have an adjustable backset. This is the distance from the edge of the door to the center of the lock hole. Usually either 2 3/4 or 2 3/8 and I run across an occasional 5". An adjustable backset will let you choose 2 3/4 or 2 3/8. Also note the type of latch. Some will be a mortise latch and some will be drive in. Not all mortise latch faces will be the same size.
When it comes to hardware, keep in mind that you get what you pay for, don't go cheap.
If all the holes match up then about all you will need is a screwdriver and everything should go smoothly. If adjustments are required, you might need a chisel and file and a drill if holes need to be enlarged.
 
  #3  
Old 02-16-02, 07:55 PM
joelp
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Dennis,
Welcome to the Do it yourself forum!

Its a good idea to change the locks on your home. There are a number of things to look for when purchasing new deadbolts.

First: Seek a deadbolt that is an ANSI Grade 1. This means that it has been tested and meets the most stringent standards.

A lock that is Grade 1 will feature the following:

A full one inch throw on the deadbolt
A hardened steel pin in the bolt to prevent it from being sawed,
A hardened collar around the cylinder to prevent wrench attacks. The collar should be free spinning.

The strike should have a steel reinforcing plate that requires several 3" screws to pass through the jamb and attach to the buildings frame.

Several companies such as Schlage and Medeco offer high security keys. This is not a necessity unless you live in major urban area, NYC, LA etc.

As for looks, all the better manufacturers offer their locks in polished brass, as well as other designer finishes. The brass locks in many cases feature lifetime guarantees on not tarnishing.

If the holes are already cut in the door, you will need to confirm that they are 21/8" in diameter bore. The side bore, where the latch goes normally is 1". Backsets are normally 2 3/8" or 2 3/4", but most manufacturers supply their locks with adjustable backsets for ease of installation.

Top manufacturers are Schlage, Baldwin, Medeco. Only use top of quality locks as imported brands as a rule do not meet the above criteria. Finally, if you wish the convenience of having all the doors in your house open with the same key, you will need to match the keyed entry with the deadbolt.

Good luck.
 
  #4  
Old 02-20-02, 01:57 PM
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Grade 1 hardware is definitely the way to go if you can afford it. If you are worried about somone smashing the lock or the door then use it. For most residential applications where you usually have a lot of glass around the entry, I feel the cost is not justified. Why attack a heavy duty lock when you can pop a window pane and turn the bolt? I like to use grade 2 or light commercial hardware myself for its functional durability. That way you compromise between heavy duty and the generic stuff. Beware of generic terms. Commercial or heavy duty could be anything from grade 1 to 3 if the manufacturer does not care. It is best to look at the grade number if it has it.
It is rare to find heavy duty Grade 1 hardware on a house so if you decide to go that route most of your adjustments would probably be with the latches/strikes as they are heavier. Most of the grade 1 uses 2 3/4 backset as its standard and you may have problems if you need 2 3/8.
 
  #5  
Old 02-21-02, 05:11 AM
joelp
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Both Baldwin and Schlage offer grade 1 deadbolts with adjustable backsets. Grade 3 is not even worth thinking about, as it is usually designed to keep a door closed in a slight breeze. Grade 2 and 1 are the route to take. The standards and testing make sure that you are getting something substantial. Unfortunately, you are correct, why bother with a good lock if your strike is mounted on 1/2" pine? That's why the need for a heavy duty strike. Ultimately, if you have a good lock on the door, they are likely to go to another house where there isn't one.
 
  #6  
Old 02-24-02, 10:56 AM
SageFisher
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Get keyed the same

All the above is very good information. I'd add, something I wish I'd thought of before replacing my front door, is to get the front and rear, and as many other door locks as you can, all keyed the same for convenience. Now I'm adding a security storm door to the front entrance and a storm door at the rear. Ideally all will have the same lock. My vehicle ignition lock needed replacing a few years back, service department didn't tell me I could order the original cylinder for replacemnt. They just threw in one they had in stock, can't tell you what a pain it's been needing different keys for door and ignition ever since.

Cheers, Steve J.
 
  #7  
Old 02-25-02, 10:03 AM
joelp
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Depending on the brand of lock you may still be able to have that done. Schlage and Baldwin use the same keyway. More importantly, a professional locksmith may be able to replace the cylinder with a replacement that broached for your keyway, thus making a rekeying possible. Give one a call.
 
  #8  
Old 02-25-02, 11:36 AM
SageFisher
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Thanks joelp, I'll check in to it.

Cheers, Steve J.
 
  #9  
Old 03-25-02, 07:23 PM
m_vorpahl
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Steve,

You can also check out the following websites.

www.securerite.com (take the home security survey and order locks right there.

www.aloa.com (Associated Locksmiths of America) To find a registered locksmith in your area.


Originally posted by SageFisher
Thanks joelp, I'll check in to it.

Cheers, Steve J.
 
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