Vinyl soffit vents


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Old 03-31-03, 08:19 AM
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Vinyl soffit vents

The home I bought last year has vinyl siding with vinyl soffits as well. Some of the vinyl soffit pieces (soffit is about 16", each piece about 4"x16") have quite small perforations. Are these small perforations intended to provide the soffit ventilion to the attic?

To continue, I find that under the vinyl soffits is plywood with no holes for ventilation. So even if the perforation vinyl soffit is for ventilation to the attic, this does not occur because of the plywood.

Question: should I remove the perforated vinyl soffits and put some opennings in the plywood and then put back the perforated vinyl soffits; or,

ignore the perforated vinyl soffits and install new round or rectangular soffit vents right thru the vinyl soffits and plywood; or

something else? Thanks!

P.S. I have a ridge vent on the roof.
 
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Old 03-31-03, 05:30 PM
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soffit vents

I would just leave them in place, sawzall both pieces at once, install the correct size vent screen. Remember, your vented area of ridge (square feet) should be pretty close to your vented area of soffit. This adds to my contention that a large % of people installing anything, shouldn't be!. BTW, are you sure the roofer cut the decking B4 installing the ridge vent? I've seen them neglect this step too!!!!
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Old 03-31-03, 07:10 PM
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I'm gonna go out on a limb and say that even if you cut you wood soffit hiding under the vinyl that the space between the rafters or trusses are probably stuffed full of insulation-unless the house was built in the late 80's early 90's or so. Almost every house that I've sided in the past 5 years has the 1/4" plywood soffit. I like to take my trusty sawzall and cut as much of the plywood out as possible-sometimes it's just easier to pull the 1/4 round/cove mouldingagainst the house off and remove the entire sheet to expose the top plate & birds mouth of the rafters. 100% of these homes had insulation stuffed into this space not allowing air to flow from the soffit into the attic space. So I have to pull or push the insulation back and I install poly chutes between the trusses/rafters and then install my vinyl soffit, I will put 3 solid up then a vented, 3 solids and a vented, so on and so on. This is plenty of air flow to help get the heat up and out of the attic especially with a ridge vent system.
 
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Old 04-01-03, 05:30 AM
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more roofing/attic ventilation ???s

IHI and slfrank-

thanks for the input.

frank- from the attic I can observe that the decking was cut for the ridge vent.

IHI - yes, you are right, the attic/wall insulation is something I will address as well, fortunately I do have access via the attic. I also need to check if the three vented three solid pattern you describe is what I have.

I also have a couple other issues you may have opinions on -- this house had a gable end addition put on extending by about 20 feet. One layer of the original gable end wall remains in place (with a small cutout for access to the addition attic area) in the attic thereby restricting air flow. Should I try to improve air circulation by removing the original gable end layer or just let each roof/attic area function indepedently?

At the other end, there is an addition at a right angle to the roof line, and here air flow is limited by the original roof -- again is there benefit to trying to improve air flow here?

To top it off, the gable end near the right angle addition does have a gable vent, with a temp controlled exhaust fan (the new addition gable end does not have a vent). All the roofs have ridge vents. Any thoughts on what to do with this vent and fan?

I might as well tell all - the gable end addition has eight - count 'em, eight 2'X6' skylight type opennings, (and its not a cathedral ceiling, so they extend from the roof to the ceiling, but there is about 4" of insulation wrapped around them) which further compound the air flow and keeping the attic cold in the winter situation. And the lighting is uninsulated recessed, adding more heat to the attic. Then theres the bathroom exhaust fans that are vented to the attic. Yikes.

My approach is to-
1. Get the bath fans vented outside
2. Get some ventilation up thru the soffits/ make sure no insulation blockage
3. Get rid of the recessed light fixtures
4. Some day, take out the skylights. They are nice at times, but create too much heat in summer and too much heat loss in winter, just the opposite of what you really want.

Any comments or opinions from viewers to this post are welcome and appreciated.
 
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Old 04-01-03, 12:54 PM
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venting attic

I'm trying to form a mental picture of your house, regardless of description let me offer some ideas/suggestions.
1. Ridge and soffit vents are designed to be PASSIVE! No electric fan is needed, in fact it will probably reduce the effectiveness of ridge vents
2. IIRC, all gable vents should be blocked when using ridge vents. I usually just staple a double thickness of 15# tar paper over them.
3. If I'm picturing your house correctly, just allow each section to stand alone in re venting and you should be OK
4. Yes, vent bathrooms outside, with adequate ridge/soffit vents venting to the attic is acceptable practice, but may not be to code in your area.
5. Recessed lights?
6. I realize the skylights are somewhat blocking the air flow, but air is like water and flows. As long as the skylight boxes don't block an entire "section". I always considered them an extra, unwanted hole in my roof, we get LOTS of rain, and the heat intrusion in the summer is horrible. As a short term fix, you may want to add more insulation around them. It sounds like you've got R13 or so now. Long term on the skylights, consider replacing them with SOLATUBES. If I have a room where some light is needed, but not much and not all the time, ie; laundry, garage, bathroom, I'll use these. They mount flush with the roof, which lessens chance for leaks, IIRC they are about 10-12 inch diameter so not much heat and cold penetration.
Good luck
frank
 
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Old 04-02-03, 04:44 AM
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Thanks for the info slfrank,

I had mentioned the recessed lights because they are not insulated above and sent a lot of heat into the attic during winter when we have snow on the roof here in upstate NY. And with no functioning soffit vents, well you get the picture.

Thanks again.
 
 

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