Vents

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  #1  
Old 04-12-00, 03:37 PM
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The roofer I've hired wants to put in three vents, two to take air out, one to bring it in. The house is very small. Heat in summer is an issue. Is this a good idea?

Another roofer I interviewed suggested something he called a ridge vent, which the the roofer I hired has never heard of, something like an open space all along the area where the two sides of the roof meet at the top. At least that's what I think he said. Has anybody heard of it? Is it a good idea?
 
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  #2  
Old 04-12-00, 05:08 PM
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first---FIRE YOUR ROOFER! Dont care if he is your best friends son,anyone who has not heard of a ridge vent is definatly not a roofer.A ridge vent consists of a continious venting along the ridge(hence the name)I have found in the 20some years of roofing that it is the best system you can use IF you have proper soffit vents, if not you waste you time money and roof.I would go wit the ridge vent(have it on my own house) hope this helps
 
  #3  
Old 04-12-00, 06:37 PM
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Oh dear. Is it the best for warm areas? What do you think of 3 vents?
 
  #4  
Old 04-12-00, 06:38 PM
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Oh, and what are soffit vents?
 
  #5  
Old 04-13-00, 03:06 AM
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I live in southeast fla and the ridge vent is about all we use on residental roofs any moreso I would say it works good in warm climates.Also i went to upstate ny a few years back and they use it alot there too so..guess it works well in any climate.As to the soffit vents they are the either round or square holes that you see on your over hang(soffit)I hope this helps Good luck
 
  #6  
Old 04-13-00, 03:54 AM
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Sondra: There is no absolute answer. Sorry about that, but here is how it works. It depends upon where you live. In the south like Georgia, Florida, southern Calif, Arizona, ridge vents are very popular, and
they work good. As you come north, they are not at all popular. The further north you come, you cannot hardly even buy them. The ridge vent, will suck in powdered snow in the winters, and has a tendency to creat leaks. If you are in an area of no snow, they are fine. We are in a snow area. I probably removed a dozen ridge vents last year, because of leakage. This is what I would reommend, no matter where you live. I would put in gable vents, one on each end, one blowing out, the other sucking in, both on separate switches, both with thermostats,
both on switches that can be shut off if you live in the colder part of the country. In other words, not wired in directly. I probably would not fire your roofer. There are alot of roofers in the north that have never seen a ridge vent, much less installed one. Also, in high wind areas, especially north winds, many end up in Kansas. Good Luck

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Jack the Contractor
 
  #7  
Old 04-13-00, 04:27 AM
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Sondra: Go to the next message down from Romy. See their ridge vent problem.

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Jack the Contractor
 
  #8  
Old 04-13-00, 04:30 AM
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Longhairedbeard:
Read the question and probelm by ROMY. This is what we have to deal with in the north country. It must be nice to live in Florida, sun, beach, umbrella's. Oh, yes, I forget, I nave a crew working in Florida. I should go visit them.

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Jack the Contractor
 
  #9  
Old 04-13-00, 04:59 AM
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jack, not arguing but i was in upstate ny buffalo syracuse and put on alot of ridge vents.I know what snow is
 
  #10  
Old 04-13-00, 09:00 AM
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Well, the roofer just started this morning, so it's not an issue anymore, but I brought it up to him again. He said he had heard of ridge vents in the north, where it's rainy, just the opposite of what's being said here, so I'm even more confused.

I live in Southern California--no snow, occasional rain--and not one roofer I talked to here ever mentioned it before the one I spoke with recently, so I'm surprised to hear that it's popular in areas like this.

On to gable vents--I've never heard that term. I've only heard of dormer vents and the twirly ones. I can't remember what they're called right now, but I was advised against those. I'm surprised the roofer wants to put up three dormers rather than two on this small house, but I guess it won't hurt. I don't know anything about vents with switches. How do the gables compare to dormers?
 
  #11  
Old 04-14-00, 04:39 PM
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sondra,gable vents go on the ends of the house,work well if you have room in your attic.I'm guessing that dormer vents are the flat kind that stick up onthe roof(guessing)
he is right about turbines though(twirlythings)Hope your happy with your finished job, remember most people are proffesionals, they do this every day so most times they know best. Most are honest and not looking to do a bad jod cause word of mouth advertising is worth more than any you can buy.also opions are like ..... everybody has one . sorry to confuse you
 
  #12  
Old 04-15-00, 04:09 AM
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Longhair is right on the vent types. If you live in sunny southern Calif. a ridge vent would be fine. I think I said that. the twirley vents will squeak after about a year.
Good Luck.

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Jack the Contractor
 
  #13  
Old 04-16-00, 09:46 AM
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The roofer and I never discussed where the vents would be placed, and he ended up putting them all on the south side, two high up and one farther down. He said he did it so they would be less conspicuous. The house is very small. Does it matter that there are no vents on the other side?

He also painted all the metal, including metal that was there before. Isn't this going to require maintenance or peel off like paint on window sills?
 
  #14  
Old 04-18-00, 03:57 AM
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Yes, the paint will peel in time. It is very hard for us to out guess your contractor. It has been my experience that I find it best to leave it up to the man in the field. He makes the call, he is there.
If he put them all on one side, he had a very good reason.

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Jack the Contractor
 
  #15  
Old 04-18-00, 11:37 AM
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What I'd like to know is whether it is usual to have all the vents on the same side or if it is believed by most roofers that some purpose is served by having the two top ones on the same side and the lower one on a different side or some other combination--and what the reasoning is.
 
  #16  
Old 04-18-00, 12:16 PM
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usually, if a customer insists on these kind of vents,(we call them mushroom vents)you try to put them on the least visible side of the house. purely cosmetic.maybe you have a knee wall in your attic and that is why two differant levels of placement The man probably did a fine job for you.
 
  #17  
Old 04-19-00, 01:38 PM
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Sondra:
Please do not take this wrong. But if these vents are all you have to worry about, you are not busy enough.

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Jack the Contractor
 
  #18  
Old 04-19-00, 05:13 PM
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All I asked is what is usually done. I thought answering such questions was the purpose of this forum.
 
  #19  
Old 04-28-00, 10:53 AM
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Sondra, from what I have seen most vents are put on the back side of the house. As said so that they won't be seen from the front of the house.

Vents all on one side is ok. Heat will rise and be discharged from your attic regardless of what side. You will probably notice that you have soffit vents on both sides of your house, so, the vents on top will pull cool air in from both sides of the house and cool the whole attic.
 
  #20  
Old 04-28-00, 05:10 PM
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Thanks for the answer. I'll see how it works this summer, unless we have another relatively cool one, like last year.
 
  #21  
Old 04-28-00, 10:35 PM
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Well, more confused? Our code states, translated for clarity, "One square foot of ventilation must be provided for every 300 square feet of heat ceiling space below, each square foot of ventilation shall be devided equally between intake air at the soffits and exhaust air at the highest possible point. Section 9.19, Building Standards Act. Your shingle warranty requires adherance.

Lets say that you add up all your upstairs(?) ceilings and you have 900 sq ft. You require 3 sq ft of ventalation, One and one half up top, and the same down below at the soffits.

Now, the little square vents that your roofer (fire him, cause he should know this) may look about a foot square, however the round hole underneith is 50 sq inchs, or about 1/3 of a foot. Use this rule to calculate your requirements, and fire your roofer.

Manufactured vented soffit averages 1.89 inchs of vent per 16 inch run, again a straight forward calculation. The manufacturer of your selected roofing product, IKO, Certainteed. etc, all have help desks, and customer service people that can ensure that your methods and means are appropriatte for your location. let me know how it works out, and fire your roofer!!
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Sondra:
Thanks for the answer. I'll see how it works this summer, unless we have another relatively cool one, like last year.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

 
  #22  
Old 04-28-00, 10:52 PM
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Yes, now I am thoroughly confused, but I can't fire somebody who finished the job and I paid. I did meet the city inspector, who didn't say anything about the job not being done to code.
 
  #23  
Old 04-29-00, 06:10 PM
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sounds like.....she should have a party and invite her roofer and a bunch of his friends.I'm sure he deserves it after all that and almost bet he would turn down the invite .sorry ,sounds like a no win job to me
 
  #24  
Old 04-29-00, 06:20 PM
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Sondra, when ever you undertake a home improvement project, its often if not invariably wise to consult with your local building office. You pay for them, and they are there to help you. Some are better than others, as any contractor can tell you, just like some contractors are better than others.
 
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