Leak in Roof


  #1  
Old 10-01-00, 06:09 PM
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Last fall I purchased a cabin in the Adirondack mountains. Over the winter I noticed some excessive ice formation off the eve in one area. This summer while spaying the outside of the cabin with wood preservative I noticed alot of wood rot of the face board and soffet in this same area which I tore out. There was also a rotted area in the roof board itself which I scraped out leaving a hole in the wood about 6" x 1" long (irregular). Fortunately it was limited to outside the wall and there has been no evidence of leakage inside. The tar paper and shingles seem fine over the hole and everywhere else I've looked. I've been trying to locate the leak but am having difficulty. I assume just plugging the hole in the roof board won't do it. I am hoping someone may know of a good method of finding the leak. The roof is asphalt shingle. Any help would be appreciated.
 
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Old 10-06-00, 10:16 AM
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quote:<HR>Originally posted by bweig:
Last fall I purchased a cabin in the Adirondack mountains. Over the winter I noticed some excessive ice formation off the eve in one area. This summer while spaying the outside of the cabin with wood preservative I noticed alot of wood rot of the face board and soffet in this same area which I tore out. There was also a rotted area in the roof board itself which I scraped out leaving a hole in the wood about 6" x 1" long (irregular). Fortunately it was limited to outside the wall and there has been no evidence of leakage inside. The tar paper and shingles seem fine over the hole and everywhere else I've looked. I've been trying to locate the leak but am having difficulty. I assume just plugging the hole in the roof board won't do it. I am hoping someone may know of a good method of finding the leak. The roof is asphalt shingle. Any help would be appreciated.<HR>


 
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Old 10-06-00, 10:26 AM
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I apologize for the repeat message above. The conditions you describe are likely due to repeated leakage and water damage caused by ice damming at the eave. Ice damming allows water to back up under the roofing materials and reach the underlayment and deck. When your roof is replaced in the future, consider using an ice dam protection membrane. These membranes (usually a self-adhering underlayment) have a "tacky" nature and provide a better underlayment in locations prone to ice damming (i.e., near the eaves).
 
 

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