top down roofing


  #1  
Old 01-16-04, 04:11 PM
gordypoo
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top down roofing

anyone familar w/ installing roofing from the ridge down, seems it would be hard on the knuckles
 
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Old 01-16-04, 04:22 PM
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Seems like it would be way more work than necessary. Just curious, but why would anyone do it that way?
 
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Old 01-16-04, 04:57 PM
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You could also carry up one shingle at a time from the ground....
 
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Old 01-16-04, 08:54 PM
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How about putting the roofing paper on top of the shingles? Might add a few years to their life.
 
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Old 01-17-04, 03:04 AM
gordypoo
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i have read that it keeps from knocking the stones of the shingles, heard about it a few years back, & am hearing about it again, just wondering if anyone has ever seen it done this way, sounds like it would take a while longer. just curious is all.
 
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Old 01-17-04, 05:31 AM
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You would probably lose even more of the "gravel" from the shingles while you were sliding them under the course above them.

Aligning and nailing them would be interesting, too. You would have to lift tabs on the previous course to install the new course. All that bending would loosen even more "gravel".
 
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Old 01-17-04, 06:42 AM
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Ok, we have all had our fun, now it is time to get serious here. You always install shingles from the bottom up. You nail on one row, and the next row comes down and cover up the nails from the row below. If you started from the top down, you could not get the nails in the right place. All you need to do is to look at the diagram and instructions written on the back of the shingle bundle. You want the shingles installed exactly as layed out by the manufacturer or your warranty is void. Hope this helps.
 
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Old 01-17-04, 07:52 AM
B
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Do you mean starting at the bottom and sitting on the roof uphill from the shingles being installed? If so, a little hard on the back from all the bending, but sure would save the granuals on the shingles. My father-in-law said he used to do that the few times he would put down a white or very light colored roof.

Bruce
 
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Old 01-17-04, 11:41 AM
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I've never worried about "saving the granules". Check the gutters of a recently roofed house after a good rain.
 
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Old 01-17-04, 11:47 AM
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A white roof on a hot day you can ruin it if you don't work from the top/upside or make arrangements to pad where you work. Ol' dad is right. I've done it like that too. Best just to wait for a cooler day...or work early or late when it's cooler.
 
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Old 01-17-04, 04:37 PM
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We take old couch cushions and sit on them especially in the summer. This cushions your butt and insulates against shingles that can reach scolding tempratures in direct sun light. I once saw a blister on a roofer about the size of a softball on his thigh from sitting on a hot roof.

While a roofer's blister isn't the point of the recent posts, this couch cushion will protect a very light colored roof from scuffs on a hot day. Sometimes we can't wait for a cooler day, when the baby is hungry and the wife wants new diamonds we have to bust our butts. (I've no baby or wife, it's just a expression I often say)
 
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Old 01-17-04, 04:46 PM
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Oh god. You guys have it all wrong, you put the tarpaper and shingles on each sheet of plywood, then install it on the trusses using your trusty framing nailer with 16p bright nails. Then you use the cheapest caulk you can find to seam it all. Then you call Jack and Grumpy to ask if the job is well done. Pictures would help them too.

 
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Old 01-17-04, 04:59 PM
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Talking

ROFL....oooops sorry! I know there's no joking policy....
 
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Old 01-19-04, 02:42 PM
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There were no jokes here. If you want to know if it is done right, Grumpy or myself are the ones to ask. I guarantee we will tell it like it is. However, if you don't want to hear the answer, don't ask the question. As a note to the above in hot weather. We always put a thermometer on the roof we are working on. When it reaches 90 degrees we are off the roof. No exceptions.
 
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Old 01-22-04, 01:59 PM
It Wasn't Me!
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It is not common trade practice to start a roof from the top down. Yes it can be done and yes you can put all the nails in the correct place. The reason for doing it is beyond my intelligence. I have and do shingle backwards when I go over the top of a dormer that is in the center of the roof, But for only one row. I have seen so many so called roofers try to shingle over a dormer and just hope for the best at the top where the shingles meet. A roofer with experience will not scuff white shingles, But it is not recommended to do the shingling when it is 90 degrees. You will see foot prints in the shingles from pressing the granules into the asphalt mat. So who ever is telling you this about shingling from the top down does not know what he or she is talking about.
 
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Old 01-22-04, 09:04 PM
bungalow jeff
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There was an article in the May, 2002, Fine Homebuilding on top-down shingling. It was not actually about shingling from the top down, but doing sections from the top-down on steep roofs. The author suggest that the method allows for faster, safer, and easier installations, however I did not really see the arguement for having to deal with three or four rows of shingles fed under the layer above already in place. The time to nail carefully through the layers at those three to four rows probably eats up more time than is actually saved. I kind of remember a lukewarm response to the article in the letters and over at Breaktime.
 
 

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