Cost Estimating


  #1  
Old 02-02-04, 01:02 PM
JimSummer
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Cost Estimating

My shingle roof is 20 years old. Although it appears in good condition now - no curling or broken shingles - I know it will need a new roof in the near future. When the time comes, I plan on having the old shingles removed and new shingles installed. Is there any rule-of-thumb way I can compute an estimate of what it will cost? I would like to have some idea of costs before having a roofing company give me an estimate. Thanks for any suggestions.
 
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Old 02-02-04, 01:53 PM
P
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Jim, the cost depends on what you want done, and the quality of roofer who will do it for you. Your desire to plan this to have it done the right way is commendable, but I would suggest you start from a slightly different perspective. Find the best roofer (which is not the same as the most expensive!) in your area, check out the references of the ones you're interested in, and select the one who gives you the best information and confidence. Since the quality of the roof is determined at least 80% by the installer, that should be the focus. Once you've found your company, then discuss with them your needs and wants, and let them propose the solution. Since you have time before you have to do anything, this approach will give you the best result.
 
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Old 02-02-04, 02:08 PM
JimSummer
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Thanks, PGRIZ

Thanks for taking your time to reply to my roofing, pgriz. That was just the sort of information I was hoping to get - a good approach to follow in getting my roofing job done. Thanks!
 
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Old 02-03-04, 12:34 PM
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Pgriz Has it all for you there for sure . You can like call around now and ask how much a sq for a new roof and what all that covers on the job. Do get 3 bids for the same kind of job. ED
 
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Old 02-03-04, 12:40 PM
JimSummer
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CHAD

Thanks for your suggestion, CHAD. The cost per square gives me something for comparison. I appreciate you taking your time to reply to my request for help.
 
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Old 02-04-04, 06:08 AM
Grumpy
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Like P and Ed said, the cost will depend on the square and the type of work to be done. While I do not advocate wasting a roofers time, since you are interested in hiring a roofer you can collect a few estimates. If all estimates are for the same kind of work, they should all be within 5%. Get at least 3 written estimates.
 
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Old 02-04-04, 12:10 PM
JimSummer
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Grumpy

Thank you for your good advice. I plan on getting three written estimates, as you suggest. Prices and work quality cover a wide range here - an the costliest is not alway the best. Thank you for taking your time to provide me your good suggestion.
 
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Old 02-04-04, 01:28 PM
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You can also make them break down the estimate in parts. How much to overshingle and how much to tear off and reshingle. Also make sure all aspects of your roof is in writing. Not limited to drip edge, flashing, exhaust boots, ice damn, etc. Do not assume anything is included unless its in the contract.
 
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Old 02-05-04, 01:48 AM
JimSummer
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Hellrazor, thanks for your comments. You gave some examples to be included that I don't know how to answer at this time. This is my first experience with new roofing and I appreciate your using the examples of things to be included. I don't know any roofers personally, so I am going to have to do some digging to find out what to include in my written specs for the roofers to make their cost estimates. Do you have any suggestion on where I might find something I can read up before so I can be more informed in writing out specs? Thanks again for your help and taking your time to provide the good suggestion and info.
 
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Old 02-06-04, 11:50 AM
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You could check the website of a manufacturer of shingles to see what the warranty requires to help you with any questions. Otherwise you just need to make sure they replace everything you expect them to. Make sure they have each item listed on the contract. If its not on the contract, even with a verbal argreement, its not binding if it becomes a fight.
 
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Old 02-06-04, 12:43 PM
JimSummer
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Hellrazor, I get the idea from the information you are giving me that you sure know your way around the roofing business. I really appreciate you taking time to pass such advice on to me. Thanks again - and if anything else comes to mind, I sure will appreciate hearing from you. Hope you have a great weekend.
 
  #12  
Old 02-06-04, 02:53 PM
Grumpy
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Hellorazor, as for breaking estimates down into parts. I will build them up with options and do some break down, but I usually walk way from jobs when customers want to know what I am charging per nail. I would give a base price for alayover with an option to tear off first... in this case I usually work up two seperate proposals though because there is so much more to be done in a tear off.

When I write my estimates I think lineraly. I basically write out what I am going to do in the order of things to be done. Infact my estimates are so detailed with a few word modifications they can become work orders.
 
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Old 02-06-04, 04:34 PM
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Ok guys, here is how I have done it for over 30 years. I charge $80 a square for labor plus materials This includes a one layer tear off, ice and frost felt, new drip edge, new gutter apron, new style D, all new gutter metal, and all new vents. Materials are extra, a 2 layer tear off, $25.00 a square extra, roof jacks required, $25.00 extra a square, scaffolding if needed is extra. Any sub roof ing replacement is $50.00 an hour plus materials.
I give a 4 year warranty on labor. Have never been called back, and have the same rates as I did in 1996. There you have it.
 
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Old 02-07-04, 04:32 AM
JimSummer
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Jack, your info is a great help. I really appreciate your taking the time to provide this information on levels of work and costs. Know anybody with your level roofing experience in mid SC?
 
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Old 02-07-04, 04:58 AM
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Jack,
You mean you will tear-off, dryin, Ice & Water & reshingle a 12:12 for $105??? Just finished a 15:12, tearing off heavy shakes. An "A" Frame two storeys. Production was barely 2 sq/manday. Out here no distributor will load anything over 10:12, so we had to hand load the roof as we went.
Jim
 
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Old 02-07-04, 06:45 AM
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Gumpy, i was talking itemizing between tearoff and overshingle,not each item. The list for him is so he knows exactly what he needs to make sure they install/replace. Since some of the fly by night morons will try absolutely anything. Not to mention the fact that if they don't follow the manufacturers instructions it can void the warranty.
 
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Old 02-07-04, 09:39 AM
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JMORGAN:
I was referring to asphalt. Shakes are a little more, but not much.
We hand load all of our shingles. I have an elevator, and tough guys. I will not allow any distributor or supplier to put any materials on any roof we are doing. Too much of a chance of roof damage. We have sone some A frames and shake roofs. Not a problem, just alot of nails. With A Frames, we just walk up them.
Lots of bugs in SC. Humid also. Have a good day.
 
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Old 02-07-04, 03:44 PM
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Elevators are great... we used one to push trusses up on a 2nd story addition. A heck of a lot easier moving 12 trusses that way since the truck couldnt get to the house to hoist them directly up.
 
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Old 02-14-04, 09:29 PM
V
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Jack...where are you located at?? I'm in VA and looking for someone not to far down the road. Didn't know if you happen to be in the neighborhood.

Thanks
 
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Old 02-14-04, 09:45 PM
V
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Jack...where are you located at?? I'm in VA and looking for someone not to far down the road. Didn't know if you happen to be in the neighborhood.

Thanks
 
 

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