flat roof options

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  #1  
Old 02-20-04, 11:41 PM
superwombat
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flat roof options

Hey all, I'm pretty new at the home improvement scene. I just bought my first house a few months ago. one part of the roof is pitched at about 2 inches per foot. Currently it has rolled roofing on it, which is getting old and starting to wrinkle and crack.

I had a roofer come and give me an estimate, and he told me rolled roofing was not suppossed to be used on houses, only on barns and things where it doesn't matter if it leaks, he said he would want to replace it with torch-down roofing.

The roof is about 35 ft long and 17 ft wide, has four vent pipes coming up through it. (which were sealed incorrectly with mastic instead of flashing)

Questions:

1. Is he right?? My home inspector told me that rolled roofing would be the normal thing to have on that portion of my roof.

2. I'm pretty sure I could replace the rolled roofing myself with some friends, assuming it's the right thing to have on my house. Would torch-down be worth the extra cost of having to pay someone else to do it??

3. If I decide to have torch-down roofing applied, would I be able to save money by tearing off the old roofing myself?

4. how many years should rolled roofing last, and how many years should torch down last....
 
  #2  
Old 02-21-04, 05:46 AM
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First thing to do is to throw away the phone number of that roofer who said rolled roofing should not be on houses. You were about to be scammed. If he was honest roofer, he would have told you, you could have either a torch down roof, a rolled roof, or a metal roof, or a rubber roof. He did not give you this options.
Now for your roof. A rolled roof is just fine. The problem is that, rolled roofs are usually put down by DIY'ers and are not put down correctly. Everyone thinks they know how, but very few do.
I would either do rolled or metal. Not a torched roof. Good Luck
 
  #3  
Old 02-21-04, 05:49 AM
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First thing to do is to throw away the phone number of that roofer who said rolled roofing should not be on houses. You were about to be scammed. If he was honest roofer, he would have told you, you could have either a torch down roof, a rolled roof, or a metal roof, or a rubber roof. He did not give you this options.
Now for your roof. A rolled roof is just fine. The problem is that, rolled roofs are usually put down by DIY'ers and are not put down correctly. Everyone thinks they know how, but very few do.
I would either do rolled or metal. Not a torched roof. A rolled roof will last about 10 years depending on which side of the house it is on. It is the least expensive of the 4 types, but not necessarily the best. Metal is best. Make sure your strip down to the roof boards and inspect them no matter what type you put down. Good Luck
 
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Old 02-21-04, 08:45 AM
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Jack is right.
He should have given you more options.
Rolled roofing, if done correctly, is an adequate roof. It is the lesser of all of them, but it will do. It will only last you around 8-10 years before it starts deteriorating.

You can put down rolled roofing which is basically just nailed down and sealed with a "plastic cement" at the laps.

You can put down what they call "modified" rolls which are applied with hot-asphalt (not recommended for your roof because it's small) or you can use a "cold-process adhesive" to adhere the roll to the roof. I probably wouldn't recommend this as a first time DIYer.

A torched roof is a very good roof, but there is so much liability. The last thing I want on my roof is someone with a "flamethrower." ;-)

Looking at the size of your job, I would look into the "self-adhered" rolls. They are like rolled roofing, but they are products that you peel the back off and you stick the roll to the roof. They are "modified" products, so they are plyable and waterproof.
They are "made" for DIYers.
It is more expensive, but worth it.....in my opinion....since your job is so small.

Ask your local roofing supplier for "self-adhered roofing" rolls.
They should be able to help you.

These other rolls (torch, hot-mop, self -adhered) will last much longer. Anywhere from 15-25 years depending which one you buy. I've seen some rolls that have been up longer than 25 years and are still in good shape.


Good luck
 
  #5  
Old 02-21-04, 08:49 AM
superwombat
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Thanks a ton gentlemen, I kind of thought I smelled a rat. I'll look around for someone else to do the work.


-DD
 
  #6  
Old 06-10-11, 06:15 PM
G
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I know this is an old thread but I really wanted to chime in after reading the responses because I disagree with some of the advice given in this thread and anyone reading it requires some clarification.

a "rolled roof" can mean many things but commonly refers to a 90 Lb mineral surfaced roll. It is usually a 3' wide roll, similiar to a shingle in texture, though no where near as stiff. This product can be purchased at almost all roofing suppliers and most home depots. While it is a roofing material, it is very commonly installed wrong. The poster that said to nail the rolled roof then seal with roof cement, I have to call bull chit. I'd like to see that detail or specification from a manufacturer or roofing contrator orginization.

90 Lb mineral surfaced rolled roofing is intended to be used as a cap sheet in the application of a built up roof, white often set in hot tar but sometimes in cold process asphalt adhesive. When 90 mineral surfaced rolled roofing is built up, as specified by the instructions containted on each and every roll, it is a fine roof. However when ANY low slope membrane has face nails introduced into the design you are asking for catastrophic failure!!!

A problem is that "rolled roofing" can mean many many things. While to me it's a 90 Lb mineral cap sheet, to others it may mean modified bitumen and to some it could mean just about anything since there are numerous roofing materials that come on rolls such as EPDM rubber and TPO, PVC etc...

I agree and disagree with the original roofer. I would not install 90 LB rolled roofing on a house. It is dog house material when improperly installed. Since I am not insured for hot tar applications I wouldn't be able to legally properly install the product.

I agree with your inspector "rolled roofing" is a common product. But many roof inspectors couldn't tell you the difference between 90 Lb mineral roll and granulated modified bitumen. I know, I have read numerous reports with false information. I don't blame them, you can't be good at everything.

However the questionw as how long would rolled roofing last...

All low slope roofing is rated in years. There are specifications for modified bitumen rated for 10 years, 15 years and 20 years. There are specs for TPO, PVC & EPDM ranging from 10-30 years. What matters is the quality of the material and how it is installed... this will dictate the longevity of the roofing system.


FWIW Modified bitumen is not just installed with hot asphalt, though that is an acceptable specification. Most Modified bitumen is formulated APP and is applied with a torch. Some modified bitumen is applied with cold process asphalt adhesive. Furthermore, modified bitumen can also be installed self adhering where the adhesives are installed at the factory. A smooth black modofied bitumen is a 10 year rated roof. Silver coat it, and it's rated for 12 years. Add a granulatd cap with a double layer of base sheet and it's a 15 year roof. Introduce a smooth mod plu before the granulated cap and it's a 20 year roof. These are torch applied specifications. Now with the introduction of various self adhering base sheets, you can eliminate one layer and get a better system rating.

Personally my preference is no longer to torch on wood framed structures. As a professional roofer, even with proper precautions, you're asking for trouble. Instead I would have specified a single ply membrane such as TPO or PVC because I like the hot air welded seams. Even EPDM is a fine roof, and none have risk of fire.

A flat locked soldered seam copper roof is a GREAT roof but ultra expensive. It'll last forever, but ultra expensive.
 
 

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