to cover or not to cover


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Old 03-04-04, 07:38 PM
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to cover or not to cover

I live in South Florida and have gotten quotes from several roofers to replace the shingle roof on the house. I am finding that each company has their own style and interpretation of doing the job. In other words, each company wants do the job in a slightly different way. This causes me to question which way is the correct way. I have several questions and I think itís best if I post each one separately.

The slope of the roof is gentle, 4/12 or less.
Some of the roofers cover the valley by overlapping the shingles and some leave the valley exposed (the middle part of the metal valley is not covered with shingles).
Which is better?
Are there pros and cons between them?

Thanks for any help and opinions.
 
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Old 03-05-04, 06:19 AM
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I used to always think that the metal valley, particularly the one with the little ridge running down the center was the way to go. It gave the appearance of wood shake, when used with dimensional shingles. I've heard, probably from "they say" that having metal like that abutting composition shingles is bad because the metal builds up too much heat and "cooks" the shingle making it brittle. It hot areas like Florida this could be a problem.

I'm not 100% sure about the veracity of this since I don't know that metal would get any hotter than the comp. shingles which tend to absorb lots of heat. However, with proper roof ventilation the heat shouldn't be more than 10 degrees hotter than the maximum outside temperature. IIRC it's the state of Florida that has lots of research on this.
 
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Old 03-05-04, 07:43 AM
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I agree with everything that Frank said.
I will add that you are getting different "correct" versions.
ARMA (Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association) recognizes the both "open" and "closed" valley systems.
Basically, the "open" valley is the OLD way and the "closed" valley is the NEW way.

In addition, their are 2 or 3 different ways to do a closed valley.

My father was an open valley guy, I am a closed valley guy.
I just think it looks better, but I'm ok with the open valleys.

I wouldn't fret the different valleys. There is no "officially correct" way.
 
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Old 03-05-04, 11:47 AM
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I for sure would go with the sheet metal valley. The one called storm valley. The kind we make with the W in it. If you think about it this is like haveing two valleys there to wear out and stops the water from going under the shingles on the other side. No way go with a one piece aluminum one ED
 
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Old 03-05-04, 04:51 PM
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I think w metal is the way to go. That's what's on my house. A lot of guys around here do the Calif Cut. The low sloped side goes under the steeper side, crossing the valley about a foot or more and the top is cut parralell to the valley about 1/4 in up. The directions on the back of the bundles will give each mfr's criteria for these valleys.
Jim
 
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Old 03-05-04, 09:30 PM
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It's all just a matter of old school vs. new school methods. Now a days, I see alot of shingled houses with valey metal. When I startedin the trades I started out as a roofer, and the only roofs that had valey metal on them were tile roofs. It dosn't really matter which way you do this as long as the end result is the same. NO LEAKS. I personally would not go with the metal, specially if I were in a high wind area. Liability and all. Plus I like to stick to old school ways. If an overlapped shingle valley was good enough for your grandfather's house, it must be good enough for yours.
 
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Old 03-06-04, 09:07 PM
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I thought that a metal sheet was always used to cover the valley whether it was open or closed.
Judging from some of the replies, it seems that when the valley is closed, there may or may not be a metal sheet beneath the shingles. Is this correct?

If the valley is closed, would it be better to have the metal valley underneath?
 
  #8  
Old 03-06-04, 10:21 PM
boardslinger
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No this is not the case. When I was roofing some 14 years ago vallies were not metaled. You ran the shingles wild on one side. Then when you ran the other side you ran the shingles wild and then cut them back so that you had a seem in the valley. IU think it was a nicer look. But like I said as long as the end result is that there are no leaks, it realy dosn't matter how it is done.
 
 

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